• We have built the historical light curve of the luminous variable GR 290 back to 1901, from old observations of the star found in several archival plates of M 33. These old recordings together with published and new data show that for at least half a century the star was in a low luminosity state, with B ~18. After 1960, five large variability cycles of visual luminosity were recorded. The amplitude of the oscillations was seen increasing towards the 1992-1994 maximum, then decreasing during the last maxima. The recent light curve indicates that the photometric variations have been quite similar in all the bands, and that the B-V color index has been constant within +/-0.1 m despite the 1.5m change of the visual luminosity. The spectrum of GR 290 at the large maximum of 1992-94, was equivalent to late-B type, while, during 2002-2014, it has varied between WN10h-11h near the visual maxima to WN8h-9h at the luminosity minima. We have detected, during this same period, a clear anti-correlation between the visual luminosity, the strength of the HeII 4686 A emission line, the strength of the 4600-4700 A lines blend and the spectral type. From a model analysis of the spectra collected during the whole 2002-2014 period we find that the Rosseland radius R_{2/3}, changed between the minimum and maximum luminosity phases by a factor of 3, while T_eff varied between about 33,000 K and 23,000 K. The bolometric luminosity of the star was not constant, but increased by a factor of ~1.5 between minimum and maximum luminosity, in phase with the apparent luminosity variations. In the light of current evolutionary models of very massive stars, we find that GR 290 has evolved from a ~60 M_Sun progenitor star and should have an age of about 4 million years. We argue that it has left the LBV stage and is moving to a Wolf-Rayet stage of late nitrogen spectral type.
  • We report the discovery and characterisation of a deeply eclipsing AM CVn-system, Gaia14aae (= ASSASN-14cn). Gaia14aae was identified independently by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN; Shappee et al. 2014) and by the Gaia Science Alerts project, during two separate outbursts. A third outburst is seen in archival Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1; Schlafly et al. 2012; Tonry et al. 2012; Magnier et al. 2013) and ASAS-SN data. Spectroscopy reveals a hot, hydrogen-deficient spectrum with clear double-peaked emission lines, consistent with an accreting double degenerate classification. We use follow-up photometry to constrain the orbital parameters of the system. We find an orbital period of 49.71 min, which places Gaia14aae at the long period extremum of the outbursting AM CVn period distribution. Gaia14aae is dominated by the light from its accreting white dwarf. Assuming an orbital inclination of 90 degrees for the binary system, the contact phases of the white dwarf lead to lower limits of 0.78 M solar and 0.015 M solar on the masses of the accretor and donor respectively and a lower limit on the mass ratio of 0.019. Gaia14aae is only the third eclipsing AM CVn star known, and the first in which the WD is totally eclipsed. Using a helium WD model, we estimate the accretor's effective temperature to be 12900+-200 K. The three out-burst events occurred within 4 months of each other, while no other outburst activity is seen in the previous 8 years of Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009), Pan-STARRS-1 and ASAS-SN data. This suggests that these events might be rebrightenings of the first outburst rather than individual events.
  • We study the long term, S Dor-type variability and the present hot phase of the LBV star GR290 (Romano's Star) in M33 in order to investigate possible links between the LBV and WNL stages of very massive stars. We use intermediate resolution spectra, obtained with WHT in December 2008, when GR290 was at minimum (V = 18.6), as well as new low resolution spectra and B V R I photometry obtained with the Loiano and Cima Ekar telescopes during 2007-2010. We identify more than 80 emission lines in the 3100-10000 A range, belonging to different species and to forbidden transitions. Many lines, especially the HeI triplets, show a P Cygni profile with an a-e radial velocity difference from -300 to -500 km/s. The shape of the 4630-4713 A emission blend and of other emission lines resembles that of WN9 stars; the blend deconvolution shows that the HeII 4686 A has a strong broad component with FWHM \simeq 1700 km/s. During 2003-2010 the star underwent large spectral variations, best seen in the 4630-4686 A emission feature. Using the late-WN spectral types of Crowther & Smith (1997), GR290 apparently varied between the WN11 and WN8-9 spectral types, the hotter being the star the fainter its visual magnitude. This spectrum-visual luminosity anticorrelation of GR290 is reminiscent of the behaviour of the best studied LBVs. During the 2008 minimum we find a significant decrease in bolometric luminosity, which could be attributed to absorption by newly formed circumstellar matter. We suggest that, presently, the broad 4686 A line and the optical continuum are formed in a central WR region, while the narrow emission line spectrum originate in an extended, slowly expanding envelope, that is composed by matter ejected during previous high luminosity phases, and ionized by the central nucleus. GR290 could have just entered in a phase preceeding the transition from the LBV state to late WN type.
  • In this article we present the O-C diagram of the hot subdwarf B pulsating star HS2201+2610 after seven years of observations. A secular increase of the main pulsation period, Pdot=(1.3+-0.1)x10**(-12), is inferred from the data. Moreover, a further sinusoidal pattern suggests the presence of a low-mass companion (Msini=~3.5 Mjup), orbiting the hot star at a distance of about 1.7 AU with a period near 1140 days.
  • Understanding the nature of the instabilities of LBVs is important to understand the late evolutionary stages of very massive stars. We investigate the long term, S Dor-type variability of the luminous blue variable GR290 (Romano's star) in M33, and its 2006 minimum phase. New spectroscopic and photometric data taken in November and December 2006 were employed in conjunction with already published data on GR290 to derive the physical structure of GR290 in different phases and the time scale of the variability. We find that by the end of 2006, GR 290 had reached the deepest visual minimum so far recorded. Its present spectrum resembles closely that of the Of/WN9 stars, and is the hottest so far recorded in this star (and in any LBV as well), while its visual brightness decreased by about 1.4 mag. This first spectroscopic record of GR290 during a minimum phase confirms that, similarly to AG Car and other LBVs, the star is subject to ample S Dor-type variations, being hotter at minimum, suggesting that the variations take place at constant bolometric luminosity.
  • We report on the discovery of the optical/IR counterpart of the 15.8s transient X-ray pulsar XTE J1946+274. We re-analysed archival BeppoSAX observations of XTE J1946+274, obtaining a new refined position (a circle with 22" radius at 90% confidence level). Based on this new position we carried out optical and infra-red (IR) follow-up observations. Within the new error circle we found a relatively optical faint (B=18.6) IR bright (H=12.1) early type reddened star (V--R=1.6). The optical spectra show strong H-alpha and H-beta emission lines. The IR photometric observations of the field confirm the presence of an IR excess for the H-alpha--emitting star (K=11.6, J--H=0.6) which is likely surrounded by a circumstellar envelope. Spectroscopic and photometric data indicate a B0--1V--IVe spectral-type star located at a distance of 8--10kpc and confirm the Be-star/X-ray binary nature of XTE J1946+274.