• Previously known to form only under high pressure synthetic conditions, here we report that the T'-type 214-structure cuprate based on the rare earth atom Tb is stabilized for ambient pressure synthesis through partial substitution of Pd for Cu. The new material is obtained in purest form for mixtures of nominal composition $Tb_{1.96}Cu_{0.80}Pd_{0.20}O_{4}$. The refined formula, in orthorhombic space group Pbca, with a = 5.5117(1) {\AA}, b = 5.5088(1) {\AA}, and c = 11.8818(1) {\AA}, is $Tb_{2}Cu_{0.83}Pd_{0.17}O_{4}$. An incommensurate structural modulation is seen along the a axis by electron diffraction and high resolution imaging. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal long range antiferromagnetic ordering at 7.9 K, with a less pronounced feature at 95 K; a magnetic moment reorientation transition is observed to onset at a field of approximately 1.1 Tesla at 3 K. The material is an n-type semiconductor.
  • The physical properties of the previously reported superconductor IrGe and the Rh1-xIrxGe solid solution are investigated. IrGe has an exceptionally high superconducting transition temperature (Tc = 4.7 K) among the isostructural 1:1 late-metal germanides MGe (M = Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt). Specific-heat measurements reveal that IrGe has an anomalously low Debye temperature, originating from a low-lying phonon, compared to the other MGe phases. A large jump at Tc in the specific-heat data clearly indicates that IrGe is a strong coupling superconductor. In the Rh1-xIrxGe solid solution, a relationship between an anomalous change in lattice constants and the Debye temperature is observed. We conclude that the unusually high Tc for IrGe is likely due to strong electron-phonon coupling derived from the presence of a low-lying phonon.
  • We report the detailed optical properties of Cd$_3$As$_2$ crystals in a wide parameter space: temperature, magnetic field, carrier concentration and crystal orientation. We investigate high-quality crystals synthesized by three different techniques. In all the studied samples, independently of how they were prepared and how they were treated before the optical experiments, our data indicate conspicuous fluctuations in the carrier density (up to 30%). These charge puddles have a characteristic scale of 100 $\mu$m, they become more pronounced at low temperatures, and possibly, they become enhanced by the presence of crystal twinning. The Drude response is characterized by very small scattering rates ($\sim 1$ meV) for as-grown samples. Mechanical treatment, such as cutting or polishing, influences the optical properties of single crystals, by increasing the Drude scattering rate and also modifying the high frequency optical response. Magneto-reflectivity and Kerr rotation are consistent with electron-like charge carriers and a spatially non-uniform carrier density.
  • The success of black phosphorus in fast electronic and photonic devices is hindered by its rapid degradation in presence of oxygen. Orthorhombic tin selenide is a representative of group IV-VI binary compounds that are robust, isoelectronic, and share the same structure with black phosphorus. We measured the band structure of SnSe and found highly anisotropic valence bands that form several valleys having fast dispersion within the layers and negligible dispersion across. This is exactly the band structure desired for efficient thermoelectric generation where SnSe has shown a great promise.
  • The crystalline garnet Mn3Fe2Si3O12 and an amorphous phase of the same nominal composition are synthesized at high pressure. The magnetic properties of the two forms are reported. Both phases order antiferromagnetically. The crystalline phase exhibits a Curie-Weiss theta of -47.2 K, with a sharp ordering transition at 12 K. The glassy phase exhibits a larger antiferromagnetic Curie-Weiss theta, of -83.0 K, with a broad ordering transition observed at 2.5 K. Both phases can be classified as magnetically frustrated, although the amorphous phase shows a much higher degree of frustration. The amorphous phase exhibits spin-glass behavior and is determined to have an actual composition of Mn3Fe2Si3O13.
  • In the Dirac/Weyl semimetal, the chiral anomaly appears as an "axial" current arising from charge-pumping between the lowest (chiral) Landau levels of the Weyl nodes, when an electric field is applied parallel to a magnetic field $\bf B$. Evidence for the chiral anomaly was obtained from the longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) in Na$_3$Bi and GdPtBi. However, current jetting effects (focussing of the current density $\bf J$) have raised general concerns about LMR experiments. Here we implement a litmus test that allows the intrinsic LMR in Na$_3$Bi and GdPtBi to be sharply distinguished from pure current jetting effects (in pure Bi). Current jetting enhances $J$ along the mid-ridge (spine) of the sample while decreasing it at the edge. We measure the distortion by comparing the local voltage drop at the spine (expressed as the resistance $R_{spine}$) with that at the edge ($R_{edge}$). In Bi, $R_{spine}$ sharply increases with $B$ but $R_{edge}$ decreases (jetting effects are dominant). However, in Na$_3$Bi and GdPtBi, both $R_{spine}$ and $R_{edge}$ decrease (jetting effects are subdominant). A numerical simulation allows the jetting distortions to be removed entirely. We find that the intrinsic longitudinal resistivity $\rho_{xx}(B)$ in Na$_3$Bi decreases by a factor of 10.9 between $B$ = 0 and 10 T. A second litmus test is obtained from the parametric plot of the planar angular magnetoresistance. These results strenghthen considerably the evidence for the intrinsic nature of the chiral-anomaly induced LMR. We briefly discuss how the squeeze test may be extended to test ZrTe$_5$.
  • We present a time- and angular-resolved photoemission (TR-ARPES) study of the transition- metal dichalcogenide WTe2, a candidate type II Weyl semimetal exhibiting extremely large magne- toresistence. Using femtosecond light pulses, we characterize the unoccupied states of the electron pockets above the Fermi level. We track the relaxation dynamics of photoexcited electrons along the unoccupied band structure and into a bulk hole pocket. Following the ultrafast carrier relaxation, we report remarkably similar decay dynamics for electrons and holes. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that carrier compensation is a key factor in the exceptional magnetotransport properties of WTe2.
  • We present results of $^{23}$Na and $^{19}$F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on NaCaCo$_2$F$_7$, a frustrated pyrochlore magnet with a Curie-Weiss temperature, $T_{cw}$ ~-140 K, and intrinsic bond disorder. Below 3.6 K both the $^{23}$Na and $^{19}$F spectra broaden substantially in comparison to higher temperatures accompanied by a considerable reduction (80 \%) of the NMR signal intensity: This proves a broad quasi-static field distribution. The $^{19}$F spin-lattice relaxation rate $^{19}(1/T_1$) exhibits a peak at 2.9 K already starting to develop below 10 K. We attribute the spin freezing to the presence of bond disorder. This is corroborated by large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations of a classical bond-disordered XY model on the pyrochlore lattice. The low freezing temperature, together with the very short magnetic correlation length not captured by the simulations, suggesting that quantum effects play a decisive role in NaCaCo$_2$F$_7$.
  • ZrTe$_5$ has been of recent interest as a potential Dirac/Weyl semimetal material. Here, we report the results of experiments performed via in-situ 3D double-axis rotation to extract the full $4\pi$ solid angular dependence of the transport properties. A clear anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was detected for every sample, with no magnetic ordering observed in the system to the experimental sensitivity of torque magnetometry. Interestingly, the AHE takes large values when the magnetic field is rotated in-plane, with the values vanishing above $\sim 60$ K where the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) also disappears. This suggests a close relation in their origins, which we attribute to Berry curvature generated by the Weyl nodes.
  • Dirac and Weyl semimetals display a host of novel properties. In Cd$_3$As$_2$, the Dirac nodes lead to a protection mechanism that strongly suppresses backscattering in zero magnetic field, resulting in ultrahigh mobility ($\sim$ 10$^7$ cm$^2$ V$^{-1}$ s$^{-1}$). In applied magnetic field, an anomalous Nernst effect is predicted to arise from the Berry curvature associated with the Weyl nodes. We report observation of a large anomalous Nernst effect in Cd$_3$As$_2$. Both the anomalous Nernst signal and transport relaxation time $\tau_{tr}$ begin to increase rapidly at $\sim$ 50 K. This suggests a close relation between the protection mechanism and the anomalous Nernst effect. In a field, the quantum oscillations of bulk states display a beating effect, suggesting that the Dirac nodes split into Weyl states, allowing the Berry curvature to be observed as an anomalous Nernst effect.
  • It has been long hoped that the realization of long-range ferromagnetic order in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) crystals, combined with their rich electronic and optical properties, would open up new possibilities for magnetic, magnetoelectric and magneto-optic applications. However, in 2D systems, the long-range magnetic order is strongly hampered by thermal fluctuations which may be counteracted by magnetic anisotropy, according to the Mermin-Wagner theorem. Prior efforts via defect and composition engineering, and proximity effect only locally or extrinsically introduce magnetic responses. Here we report the first experimental discovery of intrinsic long-range ferromagnetic order in pristine Cr2Ge2Te6 atomic layers by scanning magneto-optic Kerr microscopy. In such a 2D vdW soft ferromagnet, for the first time, an unprecedented control of transition temperature of ~ 35% - 57% enhancement is realized via surprisingly small fields (<= 0.3 Tesla in this work), in stark contrast to the stiffness of the transition temperature to magnetic fields in the three-dimensional regime. We found that the small applied field enables an effective anisotropy far surpassing the tiny magnetocrystalline anisotropy, opening up a sizable spin wave excitation gap. Confirmed by renormalized spin wave theory, we explain the phenomenon and conclude that the unusual field dependence of transition temperature constitutes a hallmark of 2D soft ferromagnetic vdW crystals. Our discovery of 2D soft ferromagnetic Cr2Ge2Te6 presents a close-to-ideal 2D Heisenberg ferromagnet for studying fundamental spin behaviors, and opens the door for exploring new applications such as ultra-compact spintronics.
  • Muon spin relaxation ($\mu$SR) measurements were carried out on SrDy$_2$O$_4$, a frustrated magnet featuring short range magnetic correlations at low temperatures. Zero-field muon spin depolarization measurements demonstrate that fast magnetic fluctuations are present from $T=300$ K down to 20 mK. The coexistence of short range magnetic correlations and fluctuations at $T=20$ mK indicates that SrDy$_2$O$_4$ features a spin liquid ground state. Large longitudinal fields affect weakly the muon spin depolarization, also suggesting the presence of fast fluctuations. For a longitudinal field of $\mu_0H=2$ T, a non-relaxing asymmetry contribution appears below $T=6$ K, indicating considerable slowing down of the magnetic fluctuations as field-induced magnetically-ordered phases are approached.
  • By combining bulk sensitive soft-X-ray angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and accurate first-principles calculations we explored the bulk electronic properties of WTe$_2$, a candidate type-II Weyl semimetal featuring a large non-saturating magnetoresistance. Despite the layered geometry suggesting a two-dimensional electronic structure, we find a three-dimensional electronic dispersion. We report an evident band dispersion in the reciprocal direction perpendicular to the layers, implying that electrons can also travel coherently when crossing from one layer to the other. The measured Fermi surface is characterized by two well-separated electron and hole pockets at either side of the $\Gamma$ point, differently from previous more surface sensitive ARPES experiments that additionally found a significant quasiparticle weight at the zone center. Moreover, we observe a significant sensitivity of the bulk electronic structure of WTe$_2$ around the Fermi level to electronic correlations and renormalizations due to self-energy effects, previously neglected in first-principles descriptions.
  • The recent discovery of extreme magnetoresistance in LaSb introduced lanthanum monopnictides as a new platform to study topological semimetals (TSMs). In this work we report the discovery of extreme magnetoresistance in LaBi, confirming lanthanum monopnictides as a promising family of TSMs. These binary compounds with the simple rock-salt structure are ideal model systems to search for the origin of extreme magnetoresistance. Through a comparative study of magnetotransport effects in LaBi and LaSb, we construct a triangular temperature-field phase diagram that illustrates how a magnetic field tunes the electronic behavior in these materials. We show that the triangular phase diagram can be generalized to other topological semimetals with different crystal structures and different chemical compositions. By comparing our experimental results to band structure calculations, we suggest that extreme magnetoresistance in LaBi and LaSb originates from a particular orbital texture on their qasi-2D Fermi surfaces. The orbital texture, driven by spin-orbit coupling, is likely to be a generic feature of various topological semimetals.
  • We report the magnetic properties of compounds in the KBaRE(BO3)2 family (RE= Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb), materials with a planar triangular lattice composed of rare earth ions. The samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and crystallize in the space group R-3m. Physical property measurements indicate the compounds display predominantly antiferromagnetic interactions between spins without any signs of magnetic ordering above 1.8 K. The ideal 2D rare earth triangular layers in this structure type make it a potential model system for investigating magnetic frustration in rare-earth-based materials.
  • The picture of how a gap closes in a semiconductor has been radically transformed by topological concepts. Instead of the gap closing and immediately re-opening, topological arguments predict that, in the absence of inversion symmetry, a metallic phase protected by Weyl nodes persists over a finite interval of the tuning parameter (e.g. pressure $P$) . The gap re-appears when the Weyl nodes mutually annihilate. We report evidence that Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Te exhibits this topological metallic phase. Using pressure to tune the gap, we have tracked the nucleation of a Fermi surface droplet that rapidly grows in volume with $P$. In the metallic state we observe a large Berry curvature which dominates the Hall effect. Moreover, a giant negative magnetoresistance is observed in the insulating side of phase boundaries, in accord with \emph{ab initio} calculations. The results confirm the existence of a topological metallic phase over a finite pressure interval.
  • Nematic quantum fluids with wavefunctions that break the underlying crystalline symmetry can form in interacting electronic systems. We examine the quantum Hall states that arise in high magnetic fields from anisotropic hole pockets on the Bi(111) surface. Spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope shows that a combination of local strain and many-body Coulomb interactions lift the six-fold Landau level (LL) degeneracy to form three valley-polarized quantum Hall states. We image the resulting anisotropic LL wavefunctions and show that they have a different orientation for each broken-symmetry state. The wavefunctions correspond precisely to those expected from pairs of hole valleys and provide a direct spatial signature of a nematic electronic phase.
  • Topological surface states have been extensively observed via optics in thin films of topological insulators. However, in typical thick single crystals of these materials, bulk states are dominant and it is difficult for optics to verify the existence of topological surface states definitively. In this work, we studied the charge dynamics of the newly formulated bulk-insulating Sn-doped Bi$_{1.1}$Sb$_{0.9}$Te$_2$S crystal by using time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. This compound shows much better insulating behavior than any other bulk-insulating topological insulators reported previously. The transmission can be enhanced an amount which is 5$\%$ of the zero-field transmission by applying magnetic field to 7 T, an effect which we believe is due to the suppression of topological surface states. This suppression is essentially independent of the thicknesses of the samples, showing the two-dimensional nature of the transport. The suppression of surface states in field allows us to use the crystal slab itself as a reference sample to extract the surface conductance, mobility, charge density and scattering rate. Our measurements set the stage for the investigation of phenomena out of the semi-classical regime, such as the topological magneto-electric effect.
  • The magnetic and electronic properties of the magnetically doped topological insulator Bi$_{\rm 2-x}$Mn$_{\rm x}$Te$_3$ were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) and measurements of static magnetization and electrical transport. The investigated high quality single crystals of Bi$_{\rm 2-x}$Mn$_{\rm x}$Te$_3$ show a ferromagnetic phase transition for $x\geq 0.04$ at $T_{C}\approx 12$ K. The Hall measurements reveal a p-type finite charge-carrier density. Measurements of the temperature dependence of the ESR signal of Mn dopants for different orientations of the external magnetic field give evidence that the localized Mn moments interact with the mobile charge carriers leading to a Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida-type ferromagnetic coupling between the Mn spins of order 2-3 meV. Furthermore, ESR reveals a low-dimensional character of magnetic correlations that persist far above the ferromagnetic ordering temperature.
  • We report on optical reflectivity experiments performed on Cd3As2 over a broad range of photon energies and magnetic fields. The observed response clearly indicates the presence of 3D massless charge carriers. The specific cyclotron resonance absorption in the quantum limit implies that we are probing massless Kane electrons rather than symmetry-protected 3D Dirac particles. The latter may appear at a smaller energy scale and are not directly observed in our infrared experiments.
  • In itinerant ferromagnets, the quenched disorder is predicted to dramatically affect the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic quantum phase transition driven by external control parameters at zero temperature. Here we report a study on Fe-doped Cr$_2$B, which, starting from the paramagnetic parent, orders ferromagnetically for Fe-doping concentrations $x$ larger than $x_{\rm c}=2.5$\%. In parent Cr$_2$B, $^{11}$B nuclear magnetic resonance data reveal the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic fluctuations. The latter are suppressed with Fe-doping, before the ferromagnetic ones finally prevail for $x>x_{\rm c}$. Indications for non-Fermi liquid behavior, usually associated with the proximity of a quantum critical point, were found for all samples, including undoped Cr$_2$B. The sharpness of the ferromagnetic-like transition changes on moving away from $x_{\rm c}$, indicating significant changes in the nature of the magnetic transitions in the vicinity of the quantum critical point. Our data provide constraints for understanding quantum phase transitions in itinerant ferromagnets in the limit of weak quenched disorder.
  • In quantum field theory, we learn that fermions come in three varieties: Majorana, Weyl, and Dirac. Here we show that in solid state systems this classification is incomplete and find several additional types of crystal symmetry-protected free fermionic excitations . We exhaustively classify linear and quadratic 3-, 6- and 8- band crossings stabilized by space group symmetries in solid state systems with spin-orbit coupling and time-reversal symmetry. Several distinct types of fermions arise, differentiated by their degeneracies at and along high symmetry points, lines, and surfaces. Some notable consequences of these fermions are the presence of Fermi arcs in non-Weyl systems and the existence of Dirac lines. Ab-initio calculations identify a number of materials that realize these exotic fermions close to the Fermi level.
  • Extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) in topological semimetals is a recent discovery which attracts attention due to its robust appearance in a growing number of materials. To search for a relation between XMR and superconductivity, we study the effect of pressure on LaBi taking advantage of its simple structure and simple composition. By increasing pressure we observe the disappearance of XMR followed by the appearance of superconductivity at P=3.5 GPa.The suppression of XMR is correlated with increasing zero-field resistance instead of decreasing in-field resistance. At higher pressures, P=11 GPa, we find a structural transition from the face center cubic lattice to a primitive tetragonal lattice in agreement with theoretical predictions. We discuss the relationship between extreme magnetoresistance, superconductivity, and structural transition in LaBi.
  • Optical measurements and band structure calculations are reported on 3D Dirac materials. The electronic properties associated with the Dirac cone are identified in the reflectivity spectra of Cd$_3$As$_2$ and Na$_3$Bi single crystals. In Na$_3$Bi, the plasma edge is found to be strongly temperature dependent due to thermally excited free carriers in the Dirac cone. The thermal behavior provides an estimate of the Fermi level $E_F=25$ meV and the z-axis Fermi velocity $v_z = 0.3 \text{ eV} \AA$ associated with the heavy bismuth Dirac band. At high energies above the $\Gamma$-point Lifshitz gap energy, a frequency and temperature independent $\epsilon_2$ indicative of Dirac cone interband transitions translates into an ab-plane Fermi velocity of $3 \text{ eV} \AA$. The observed number of IR phonons rules out the $\text{P}6_3\text{/mmc}$ space group symmetry but is consistent with the $\text{P}\bar{3}\text{c}1$ candidate symmetry. A plasmaron excitation is discovered near the plasmon energy that persists over a broad range of temperature. The optical signature of the large joint density of states arising from saddle points at $\Gamma$ is strongly suppressed in Na$_3$Bi consistent with band structure calculations that show the dipole transition matrix elements to be weak due to the very small s-orbital character of the Dirac bands. In Cd$_3$As$_2$, a distinctive peak in reflectivity due to the logarithmic divergence in $\epsilon_1$ expected at the onset of Dirac cone interband transitions is identified. The center frequency of the peak shifts with temperature quantitatively consistent with a linear dispersion and a carrier density of $n=1.3\times10^{17}\text{ cm}^{-3}$. The peak width gives a measure of the Fermi velocity anisotropy of $10\%$, indicating a nearly spherical Fermi surface. The lineshape gives an upper bound estimate of 7 meV for the potential fluctuation energy scale.
  • The Dirac and Weyl semimetals are unusual materials in which the nodes of the bulk states are protected against gap formation by crystalline symmetry. The chiral anomaly~\cite{Adler,Bell}, predicted to occur in both systems, was recently observed as a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) in Na$_3$Bi and in TaAs. An important issue is whether Weyl physics appears in a broader class of materials. We report evidence for the chiral anomaly in the half-Heusler GdPtBi. In zero field, GdPtBi is a zero-gap semiconductor with quadratic bands. In a magnetic field, the Zeeman energy leads to Weyl nodes. We have observed a large negative LMR with the field-steering properties specific to the chiral anomaly. The chiral anomaly also induces strong suppression of the thermopower. We report a detailed study of the thermoelectric response function $\alpha_{xx}$ of Weyl fermions. The scheme of creating Weyl nodes from quadratic bands suggests that the chiral anomaly may be observable in a broad class of semimetals.