• Dynamic and thermal processes regulate the structure of the multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), and ultimately establish how galaxies evolve through star formation. Thus, to constrain ISM models and better understand the interplay of these processes, it is of great interest to measure the thermal pressure ($P_{\rm th}$) of the diffuse, neutral gas. By combining [C II] 158 $\mu$m, HI, and CO data from 31 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH sample, we have measured thermal pressures in 534 predominantly atomic regions with typical sizes of $\sim$1 kiloparsec. We find a distribution of thermal pressures in the $P_{\rm th}/k\sim10^3-10^5$ K cm$^{-3}$ range. For a sub-sample of regions with conditions similar to those of the diffuse, neutral gas in the Galactic plane, we find thermal pressures that follow a log-normal distribution with a median value of $P_{\rm th}/k\approx3600$ K cm$^{-3}$. These results are consistent with thermal pressure measurements using other observational methods. We find that $P_{\rm th}$ increases with radiation field strength and star formation activity, as expected from the close link between the heating of the gas and the star formation rate. Our thermal pressure measurements fall in the regime where a two-phase ISM with cold and warm neutral medium could exist in pressure equilibrium. Finally, we find that the midplane thermal pressure of the diffuse gas is about $\sim30$% of the vertical weight of the overlying ISM, consistent with results from hydrodynamical simulations of self-regulated star formation in galactic disks.
  • The conversion of the IR emission into star formation rate can be strongly dependent on the physical properties of the dust, which are affected by the environmental conditions where the dust is embedded. We study here the dust properties of a set of HII regions in the Local Group Galaxy M33 presenting different spatial configurations between the stars, gas and dust to understand the dust evolution under different environments. We model the SED of each region using the DustEM tool and obtain the mass relative to hydrogen for Very Small Grains (YVSG), Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (YPAH) and Big Grains (YBG). The relative mass of the VSGs (YVSG/YTOT) is a factor of 1.7 higher for HII regions classified as filled and mixed than for regions presenting a shell structure. The enhancement of VSGs within NGC 604 and NGC 595 is correlated to expansive gas structures with velocities greater than 50 km/s. The gas-to-dust ratio derived for the HII regions in our sample exhibits two regimes related to the HI-H2 transition of the ISM. Regions corresponding to the HI diffuse regime present a gas-to-dust ratio compatible with the expected value if we assume that the gas-to-dust ratio scales linearly with metallicity, while regions corresponding to a H2 molecular phase present a flatter dust-gas surface density distribution. The fraction of VSGs can be affected by the conditions of the interstellar environment: strong shocks of 50-90 km/s existing in the interior of the most luminous HII regions can lead to fragmentation of BGs into smaller ones, while the more evolved shell and clear shell objects provide a more quiescent environment where reformation of dust BG grains might occur. The gas-to-dust variations found in this analysis might imply that grain coagulation and/or gas-phase metals incorporation to the dust mass is occurring in the interior of the HII regions in M33.
  • The [NII] 122 and 205 \mu m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ~1 kiloparsec, with observations of both [NII] far-infrared lines. We measure [NII] 122/205 line ratios in the ~0.6-6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities $n_e$~1-300 cm$^{-3}$, with a median value of $n_e$=30 cm$^{-3}$. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as a high as a factor of ~50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that $n_e$ increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{SFR}$). As the intensity of the [NII] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the star formation rate (SFR). We derive relations between the [NII] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [NII] surface brightness and $\Sigma_{SFR}$ can be understood as a property of the $n_e$ distribution. For regions with $n_e$ close to or higher than the [NII] line critical densities, the low-density limit [NII]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR since [NII] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [NII] emission, SFR, and $n_e$ by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.
  • To compute the SFR of galaxies from the rest-frame UV it is essential to take into account the obscuration by dust. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the IR. Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. Doing so, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation, taking into account the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies. We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially-resolved FUV to FIR SED of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 and 100 micron) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 micron and the TIR). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators. Naturally taking into account the variable impact of dust heated by old stellar populations, they constitute a step towards universal estimators.
  • We model the infrared to submillimeter spectral energy distribution of 11 nearby galaxies of the KINGFISH sample using Spitzer and Herschel data and compare model extrapolations at 870um (using different fitting techniques) with LABOCA 870um observations. We investigate how the differences between predictions and observations vary with model assumptions or environment. At global scales, we find that modified blackbody models using realistic cold emissivity indices (beta_c=2 or 1.5) are able to reproduce the 870um observed emission within the uncertainties for most of the sample. Low values (beta_c<1.3) would be required in NGC0337, NGC1512 and NGC7793. At local scales, we observe a systematic 870um excess when using beta_=2.0. The beta_c=1.5 or the Draine and Li (2007) models can reconcile predictions with observations in part of the disks. Some of the remaining excesses occur towards the centres and can be partly or fully accounted for by non-dust contributions such as CO(3-2) or, to a lesser extent, free-free or synchrotron emission. In three non-barred galaxies, the remaining excesses rather occur in the disk outskirts. This could be a sign of a flattening of the submm slope (and decrease of the effective emissivity index) with radius in these objects.
  • We investigate the far infrared spectrum of NGC 1266, a S0 galaxy that contains a massive reservoir of highly excited molecular gas. Using the SPIRE-FTS, we detect the $^{12}$CO ladder up to J=(13-12), [C I] and [N II] lines, and also strong water lines more characteristic of UltraLuminous IR Galaxies (ULIRGs). The 12CO line emission is modeled with a combination of a low-velocity C-shock and a PDR. Shocks are required to produce the H2O and most of the high-J 12CO emission. Despite having an infrared luminosity thirty times less than a typical ULIRG, the spectral characteristics and physical conditions of the ISM of NGC 1266 closely resemble those of ULIRGs, which often harbor strong shocks and large-scale outflows.
  • The use of IFS is since recently allowing to measure the emission line fluxes of an increasingly large number of star-forming galaxies both locally and at high redshift. The main goal of this study is to review the most widely used empirical oxygen calibrations, O3N2 and N2, by using new direct abundance measurements. We pay special attention to the expected uncertainty of these calibrations as a function of the index value or abundance derived and the presence of possible systematic offsets. This is possible thanks to the analysis of the most ambitious compilation of Te-based HII regions to date. This new dataset compiles the Te-based abundances of 603 HII regions extracted from the literature but also includes new measurements from the CALIFA survey. Besides providing new and improved empirical calibrations for the gas abundance, we also present here a comparison between our revisited calibrations with a total of 3423 additional CALIFA HII complexes with abundances derived using the ONS calibration by Pilyugin et al. (2010). The combined analysis of Te-based and ONS abundances allows us to derive their most accurate calibration to date for both the O3N2 and N2 single-ratio indicators, in terms of all statistical significance, quality and coverage of the space of parameters. In particular, we infer that these indicators show shallower abundance dependencies and statistically-significant offsets compared to those of Pettini and Pagel (2004), Nagao et al. (2006) and P\'erez-Montero and Contini (2009). The O3N2 and N2 indicators can be empirically applied to derive oxygen abundances calibrations from either direct abundance determinations with random errors of 0.18 and 0.16, respectively, or from indirect ones (but based on a large amount of data) reaching an average precision of 0.08 and 0.09 dex (random) and 0.02 and 0.08 dex (systematic; compared to the direct estimations),respectively.
  • We derive the distribution of the synchrotron spectral index across NGC6946 and investigate the correlation between the radio continuum (synchrotron) and far-infrared (FIR) emission using the KINGFISH Herschel PACS and SPIRE data. The radio--FIR correlation is studied as a function of star formation rate, magnetic field strength, radiation field strength, and the total gas surface brightness. The synchrotron emission follows both star-forming regions and the so-called magnetic arms present in the inter-arm regions. The synchrotron spectral index is steepest along the magnetic arms ($\alpha_n \sim 1$), while it is flat in places of giant H{\sc ii} regions and in the center of the galaxy ($\alpha_n \sim 0.6-0.7$). The map of $\alpha_n$ provides an observational evidence for aging and energy loss of cosmic ray electrons propagating in the disk of the galaxy. Variations in the synchrotron--FIR correlation across the galaxy are shown to be a function of both star formation and magnetic fields. We find that the synchrotron emission correlates better with cold rather than with warm dust emission, when the interstellar radiation field is the main heating source of dust. The synchrotron--FIR correlation suggests a coupling between the magnetic field and the gas density. NGC6946 shows a power-law behavior between the total (turbulent) magnetic field strength B and the star formation rate surface density $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ with an index of 0.14\,(0.16)$\pm$0.01. This indicates an efficient production of the turbulent magnetic field with the increasing gas turbulence expected in actively star forming regions. The scale-by-scale analysis of the synchrotron--FIR correlation indicates that the ISM affects the propagation of old/diffused cosmic ray electrons, resulting in a diffusion coefficient of $D_0=4.6\times 10^{28}$\,cm$^2$\,s$^{-1}$ for 2.2\,GeV CREs.
  • EMU is a wide-field radio continuum survey planned for the new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope. The primary goal of EMU is to make a deep (rms ~ 10 microJy/beam) radio continuum survey of the entire Southern Sky at 1.3 GHz, extending as far North as +30 degrees declination, with a resolution of 10 arcsec. EMU is expected to detect and catalogue about 70 million galaxies, including typical star-forming galaxies up to z~1, powerful starbursts to even greater redshifts, and AGNs to the edge of the visible Universe. It will undoubtedly discover new classes of object. This paper defines the science goals and parameters of the survey, and describes the development of techniques necessary to maximise the science return from EMU.
  • The total infrared (TIR) luminosity from galaxies can be used to examine both star formation and dust physics. We provide here new relations to estimate the TIR luminosity from various Spitzer bands, in particular from the 8 micron and 24 micron bands. To do so, we use 45" subregions within a subsample of nearby face-on spiral galaxies from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS) that have known oxygen abundances as well as integrated galaxy data from the SINGS, the Local Volume Legacy Survey (LVL) and Engelbracht et al. (2008) samples. Taking into account the oxygen abundances of the subregions, the star formation rate intensity, and the relative emission of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8 micron, the warm dust at 24 micron and the cold dust at 70 micron and 160 micron we derive new relations to estimate the TIR luminosity from just one or two of the Spitzer bands. We also show that the metallicity and the star formation intensity must be taken into account when estimating the TIR luminosity from two wave bands, especially when data longward of 24 micron are not available.
  • Ten years ago our team completed the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale. Cepheids were detected in some 25 galaxies and used to calibrate four secondary distance indicators that reach out into the expansion field beyond the noise of galaxy peculiar velocities. The result was H_0 = 72 +/- 8 km/sec/Mpc and put an end to galaxy distances uncertain by a factor of two. This work has been awarded the Gruber Prize in Cosmology for 2009.
  • Compared to starburst galaxies, normal star forming galaxies have been shown to display a much larger dispersion of the dust attenuation at fixed reddening through studies of the IRX-beta diagram (the IR/UV ratio "IRX" versus the UV color "beta"). To investigate the causes of this larger dispersion and attempt to isolate second parameters, we have used GALEX UV, ground-based optical, and Spitzer infrared imaging of 8 nearby galaxies, and examined the properties of individual UV and 24 micron selected star forming regions. We concentrated on star-forming regions, in order to isolate simpler star formation histories than those that characterize whole galaxies. We find that 1) the dispersion is not correlated with the mean age of the stellar populations, 2) a range of dust geometries and dust extinction curves are the most likely causes for the observed dispersion in the IRX-beta diagram 3) together with some potential dilution of the most recent star-forming population by older unrelated bursts, at least in the case of star-forming regions within galaxies, 4) we also recover some general characteristics of the regions, including a tight positive correlation between the amount of dust attenuation and the metal content. Although generalizing our results to whole galaxies may not be immediate, the possibility of a range of dust extinction laws and geometries should be accounted for in the latter systems as well.
  • [abridged] We present observations of the dust and atomic gas phase in seven dwarf irregular galaxies of the M81 group from the SINGS and THINGS surveys. The Spitzer observations provide a first glimpse of the nature of the non-atomic ISM in these metal-poor (Z~0.1 Z_sun), quiescent (SFR~0.001-0.1 M_sun/yr) dwarf galaxies. Dust emission is detected in five out of the seven targets. Most detected dust emission is restricted to HI column densities >1x10^21 cm^-2. Spitzer spectroscopy of two regions in the brightest galaxies (IC 2574 and Holmberg II) show distinctly different spectral shapes. The spectrum of IC 2574 shows aromatic features that are less luminous (relative to the FIR luminosity) compared to an average SINGS spiral galaxy by a factor of \~7 . The aromatic features in Holmberg~II (which has only a slightly lower gas-phase metallicity) are fainter than in IC 2574 by an order of magnitude. This result emphazises that the strength of the aromatic features is not a simple linear function of metallicity. We estimate dust masses of ~10^4-10^6 M_sun for the M81 dwarf galaxies, resulting in an average dust--to--gas ratio (M_dust/M_HI) of ~3x10^-4 (1.5x10^-3 if only the HI that is associated with dust emission is considered); this is an order of magnitude lower than the typical value derived for the SINGS spirals. The dwarf galaxies are underluminous per unit star formation rate at 70um as compared to the more massive galaxies in SINGS by a factor of ~2. However, the average 70um/160um ratio in the sample dwarf galaxies is higher than what is found in the other galaxies of the SINGS sample. This can be explained by a combination of a lower dust content in conjunction with a higher dust temperature in the dwarfs.
  • This is the first part of an Halpha kinematics follow-up survey of the SINGS sample. The data for 28 galaxies are presented. The observations were done on three different telescopes with FaNTOmM, an integral field photon counting spectrometer, installed in the respective focal reducer of each telescope. The data reduction was done through a newly built pipeline with the aim of producing the most homogenous data set possible. Adaptive spatial binning was applied to the data cubes in order to get a constant signal-to-noise ratio across the field of view. Radial velocity and monochromatic maps were generated using a new algorithm and the kinematical parameters were derived using tilted-ring models.
  • Uncertainty in the metal abundance dependence of the Cepheid variable period- luminosity (PL) relation remains one of the outstanding sources of systematic error in the extragalactic distance scale and Hubble constant. To test for such a metallicity dependence, we have used the WFPC2 camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to observe Cepheids in two fields in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, which span a range in oxygen abundance of 0.7+-0.15 dex. A differential analysis of the PL relations in V and I in the two fields yields a marginally significant change in the inferred distance modulus on metal abundance, with d(m-M)/d[O/H] = -0.24+-0.16 mag/dex. The trend is in the theoretically predicted sense that metal-rich Cepheids appear brighter and closer than metal-poor stars. External comparisons of Cepheid distances with those derived from three other distance indicators, in particular the tip of the red giant branch method, further constrain the magnitude of any Z-dependence of the PL relation at V and I. The overall effects of any metallicity dependence on the distance scale derived with HST will be of the order of a few percent or less for most applications, though distances to individual galaxies at the extremes of the metal abundance range may be affected at the 10% level.
  • The massive stellar content, the OB associations and the star clusters in an HST field in M101 = NGC 5457 are investigated. A clustering algorithm yields 79 putative associations. Their size distribution is similar to that found in the Magellanic Clouds, M31 and M33, with an average size around 90 pc. The V luminosity function for the stars contained within the associations has a slope dlogN/dV = 0.60 +/- 0.05, while an average reddening E(B-V) = 0.21 mag is measured. The stellar content is further discussed by means of color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. Ages are estimated using theoretical isochrones, and range between 3 and 14 Myr (+\- 2 Myr). We find a suggestion that the upper mass limit of the IMF for stars in OB associations in M101 may be quite high, contrary to some theoretical expectations that the mass limit should be lower in a high metallicity environment. Forty-one star cluster candidates and two HII region core clusters are identified in the M101 field, and their integrated photometric properties are compared with the cluster system of the LMC and M33. Most of the M101 clusters probably belong to the class of young, populous star clusters such as are found in the LMC. Red clusters are rare in this field. In the Appendix the objective finding algorithm is applied to the brightest stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud.