• We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4$''$) of the very quiet Sun at 1.56$\mu$m obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ($\sim$150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with inclinations and azimuth values compatible with an isotropic distribution. The filling factors are typically below 30\%. We also find that the flux of the two polarities is not balanced. From the other half of the observed quiet-Sun area $\sim$50\% are two-lobed Stokes $V$ profiles, meaning that 23\% of the field of view can be adequately explained with a single constant magnetic field embedded in a non-magnetic atmosphere. The magnetic field vector and filling factor are reliable inferred in only 50\% based on the regular profiles. Therefore, 12\% of the field of view harbour hG fields with filling factors typically below 30\%. At our present spatial resolution, 70\% of the pixels apparently are non-magnetised.
  • The super-storm of November 20, 2003 was associated with a high speed coronal mass ejection which originated in the NOAA AR 10501 on November 18. This coronal mass ejection had severe terrestrial consequences leading to a geomagnetic storm with DST index of -472 nT, the strongest of the current solar cycle. In this paper, we attempt to understand the factors that led to the coronal mass ejection on November 18. We have also studied the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field of NOAA AR 10501, the source region of this coronal mass ejection. For this purpose, the MDI line-of-sight magnetograms and vector magnetograms from Solar Flare Telescope, Mitaka, obtained during November, 17-19, 2003 were analysed. In particular, quantitative estimates of the temporal variation in magnetic flux, energy and magnetic field gradient were estimated for the source active region. The evolution of these quantities was studied for the 3-day period with an objective to understand the pre-flare configuration leading up to the moderate flare which was associated with the geo-effective coronal mass ejection. We also examined the chromospheric images recorded in H-alpha from Udaipur Solar Observatory to compare the flare location with regions of different magnetic field and energy. Our observations provide evidence that the flare associated with the CME occurred at a location marked by high magnetic field gradient which led to release of free energy stored in the active region.