• We present a new single-ion endcap trap for high precision spectroscopy that has been designed to minimize ion-environment interactions. We describe the design in detail and then characterize the working trap using a single trapped 171 Yb ion. Excess micromotion has been eliminated to the resolution of the detection method and the trap exhibits an anomalous phonon heating rate of d<n> /dt = 24 +30/-24 per second. The thermal properties of the trap structure have also been measured with an effective temperature rise at the ion's position of 0.14 +/- 0.14 K. The small perturbations to the ion caused by this trap make it suitable to be used for an optical frequency standard with fractional uncertainties below the 10^-18 level.
  • We used Precise Point Positioning, a well-established GPS carrier-phase frequency transfer method to perform a direct remote comparison of two optical frequency standards based on single laser-cooled $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ions operated at NPL, UK and PTB, Germany. At both institutes an active hydrogen maser serves as a flywheel oscillator; it is connected to a GPS receiver as an external frequency reference and compared simultaneously to a realization of the unperturbed frequency of the ${{}^2S_{1/2}(F=0)-{}^2D_{3/2}(F=2)}$ electric quadrupole transition in ${}^{171}$Yb${}^+$ via an optical femtosecond frequency comb. To profit from long coherent GPS link measurements we extrapolate over the various data gaps in the optical clock to maser comparisons which introduces maser noise to the frequency comparison but improves the uncertainty from the GPS link. We determined the total statistical uncertainty consisting of the GPS link uncertainty and the extrapolation uncertainties for several extrapolation schemes. Using the extrapolation scheme with the smallest combined uncertainty, we find a fractional frequency difference $y(\mathrm{PTB})-y(\mathrm{NPL})$ of $-1.3(1.2)\times 10^{-15}$ for a total measurement time of 67 h. This result is consistent with an agreement of both optical clocks and with recent absolute frequency measurements against caesium fountain clocks.
  • Singly-ionized ytterbium, with ultra-narrow optical clock transitions at 467 nm and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of $6\times 10^{-16}$. Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a three-fold improvement in the constraint on the time-variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, $\dot{\mu}/{\mu} = 0.2(1.1)\times 10^{-16}$ year$^{-1}$, along with an improved constraint on time-variation of the fine structure constant, $\dot{\alpha}/{\alpha} = -0.7(2.1)\times 10^{-17}$ year$^{-1}$.
  • We present a method of transferring a cold atom between spatially separated microtraps by means of a Raman transition between the ground motional states of the two traps. The intermediate states for the Raman transition are the vibrational levels of a third microtrap, and we determine the experimental conditions for which the overlap of the wave functions leads to an efficient transfer. There is a close analogy with the Franck-Condon principle in the spectroscopy of molecules. Spin-dependent manipulation of neutral atoms in microtraps has important applications in quantum information processing. We also show that starting with several atoms, precisely one atom can be transferred to the final potential well hence giving deterministic preparation of single atoms.
  • We predict the resonance enhanced magnetic field dependence of atom-dimer relaxation and three-body recombination rates in a $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) close to 1007 G. Our exact treatments of three-particle scattering explicitly include the dependence of the interactions on the atomic Zeeman levels. The Feshbach resonance distorts the entire diatomic energy spectrum causing interferences in both loss phenomena. Our two independent experiments confirm the predicted recombination loss over a range of rate constants that spans four orders of magnitude.
  • We manipulate a Bose-Einstein condensate using the optical trap created by the diffraction of a laser beam on a fast ferro-electric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The modulator acts as a phase grating which can generate arbitrary diffraction patterns and be rapidly reconfigured at rates up to 1 kHz to create smooth, time-varying optical potentials. The flexibility of the device is demonstrated with our experimental results for splitting a Bose-Einstein condensate and independently transporting the separate parts of the atomic cloud.