• Merging neutron stars offer an exquisite laboratory for simultaneously studying strong-field gravity and matter in extreme environments. We establish the physical association of an electromagnetic counterpart EM170817 to gravitational waves (GW170817) detected from merging neutron stars. By synthesizing a panchromatic dataset, we demonstrate that merging neutron stars are a long-sought production site forging heavy elements by r-process nucleosynthesis. The weak gamma-rays seen in EM170817 are dissimilar to classical short gamma-ray bursts with ultra-relativistic jets. Instead, we suggest that breakout of a wide-angle, mildly-relativistic cocoon engulfing the jet elegantly explains the low-luminosity gamma-rays, the high-luminosity ultraviolet-optical-infrared and the delayed radio/X-ray emission. We posit that all merging neutron stars may lead to a wide-angle cocoon breakout; sometimes accompanied by a successful jet and sometimes a choked jet.
  • We study PTF11mnb, a He-poor supernova (SN) whose pre-peak light curves (LCs) resemble those of SN 2005bf, a peculiar double-peaked stripped-envelope (SE) SN. LCs, colors and spectral properties are compared to those of SN 2005bf and normal SE SNe. A bolometric LC is built and modeled with the SNEC hydrodynamical code explosion of a MESA progenitor star, as well as with semi-analytic models. The LC of PTF11mnb turns out to be similar to that of SN 2005bf until $\sim$50 d, when the main (secondary) peaks occur at $-18.5$ mag. The early peak occurs at $\sim$20 d, and is about 1.0 mag fainter. After the main peak, the decline rate of PTF11mnb is remarkably slower than that of SN 2005bf, and it traces the $^{56}$Co decay rate. The spectra of PTF11mnb reveal no traces of He unlike in the case of SN Ib 2005bf. The bolometric LC is well reproduced by the explosion of a massive ($M_{ej} =$ 7.8 $M_{\odot}$), He-poor star with a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, a total $^{56}$Ni mass of 0.59 $M_{\odot}$ and an explosion energy of 2.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg. Alternatively, a normal SN Ib/c explosion [M($^{56}$Ni)$=$0.11 $M_{\odot}$, $E_{K}$ = 0.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg, $M_{ej} =$ 1 $M_{\odot}$] can power the first peak while a magnetar ($B$=5.0$\times$10$^{14}$ G, $P=18.1$ ms) provides energy for the main peak. The early $g$-band LC implies a radius of at least 30 $R_{\odot}$. If PTF11mnb arose from a massive He-poor star characterized by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, the ejecta mass and the absence of He imply a large ZAMS mass ($\sim85 M_{\odot}$) for the progenitor, which most likely was a Wolf-Rayet star, surrounded by an extended envelope formed either by a pre-SN eruption or due to a binary configuration. Alternatively, PTF11mnb could be powered by a normal SE SN during the first peak and by a magnetar afterwards.
  • We present multi-wavelength follow-up campaigns by the AstroSat-CZTI and GROWTH collaborations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW170104. At the time of the GW170104 trigger, the AstroSat CZTI field-of-view covered 50.3\% of the sky localization. We do not detect any hard X-ray (>100 keV) signal at this time, and place an upper limit of $\approx 4.5 \times 10^{-7}~{\rm erg~cm}^{-2}{\rm~s}^{-1}$ for a 1\,s timescale. Separately, the ATLAS survey reported a rapidly fading optical source dubbed ATLAS17aeu in the error circle of GW170104. Our panchromatic investigation of ATLAS17aeu shows that it is the afterglow of an unrelated long, soft GRB~170105A, with only a fortuitous spatial coincidence with GW170104. We then discuss the properties of this transient in the context of standard long GRB afterglow models.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013fc, a bright type II supernova (SN) in a circumnuclear star-forming ring in the luminous infrared galaxy ESO 154-G010, observed as part of the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO). SN 2013fc is both photometrically and spectroscopically similar to the well-studied type IIn SN 1998S and to the bright type II-L SN 1979C. It exhibits an initial linear decline, followed by a short plateau phase and a tail phase with a decline too fast for $^{56}$Co decay with full gamma-ray trapping. Initially the spectrum was blue and featureless. Later on, a strong broad ($\sim 8000$ km s$^{-1}$) H $\alpha$ emission profile became prominent. We apply a Starlight stellar population model fit to the SN location (observed when the SN had faded) to estimate a high extinction of $A_V = 2.9 \pm 0.2$ mag and an age of $10_{-2}^{+3}$ Myr for the underlying cluster. We compare the SN to SNe 1998S and 1979C and discuss its possible progenitor star considering the similarities to these events. With a peak brightness of $B = -20.46 \pm 0.21$ mag, SN 2013fc is 0.9 mag brighter than SN 1998S and of comparable brightness to SN 1979C. We suggest that SN 2013fc was consistent with a massive red supergiant (RSG) progenitor. Recent mass loss probably due to a strong RSG wind created the circumstellar matter illuminated through its interaction with the SN ejecta. We also observe a near-infrared excess, possibly due to newly condensed dust.
  • We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on Jan. 21, 2009. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ~10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by 56Ni - 56Co radioactive decay. The SDSS DR10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift the peak magnitude of the OT is close to -22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a sun-like star by the central super-massive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.
  • There is a consensus that Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a binary companion. However, direct observation of SN Ia progenitors is lacking, and the precise nature of the binary companion remains uncertain. A temporal series of high-resolution optical spectra of the SN Ia PTF 11kx reveals a complex circumstellar environment that provides an unprecedentedly detailed view of the progenitor system. Multiple shells of circumsteller are detected and the SN ejecta are seen to interact with circumstellar material (CSM) starting 59 days after the explosion. These features are best described by a symbiotic nova progenitor, similar to RS Ophiuchi.
  • (Abridged). The optical light curve of some SNe may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock in optically thick circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and -dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM (IIn/Ibn/SLSN-I). Two SNe in our sample have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. Therefore, we suggest that their optical light curves are powered by shock breakout in CSM. We show that two other events were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, type-IIn/Ibn SNe are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained at too early times to conclude about their nature. We argue that the optical light curves of SNe, for which the X-ray emission peaks at late times, are likely powered by the diffusion of shock energy from a dense CSM. We comment about the possibility to detect some of these events in radio.
  • The nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe in M101 (cz=241 km s^-1) provides a unique opportunity to study the early evolution of a "normal" Type Ia supernova, its compositional structure, and its elusive progenitor system. We present 18 high signal-to-noise spectra of SN 2011fe during its first month beginning 1.2 days post-explosion and with an average cadence of 1.8 days. This gives a clear picture of how various line-forming species are distributed within the outer layers of the ejecta, including that of unburned material (C+O). We follow the evolution of C II absorption features until they diminish near maximum light, showing overlapping regions of burned and unburned material between ejection velocities of 10,000 and 16,000 km s^-1. This supports the notion that incomplete burning, in addition to progenitor scenarios, is a relevant source of spectroscopic diversity among SNe Ia. The observed evolution of the highly Doppler-shifted O I 7774 absorption features detected within five days post-explosion indicate the presence of O I with expansion velocities from 11,500 to 21,000 km s^-1. The fact that some O I is present above C II suggests that SN 2011fe may have had an appreciable amount of unburned oxygen within the outer layers of the ejecta.
  • We present the discovery of PTF 10vgv, a Type Ic supernova detected by the Palomar Transient Factory, using the Palomar 48-inch telescope (P48). R-band observations of the PTF 10vgv field with P48 probe the supernova emission from its very early phases (about two weeks before R-band maximum), and set limits on its flux in the week prior to the discovery. Our sensitive upper limits and early detections constrain the post-shock-breakout luminosity of this event. Via comparison to numerical (analytical) models, we derive an upper-limit of R \lesssim 4.5 Rsun (R \lesssim 1 Rsun) on the radius of the progenitor star, a direct indication in favor of a compact Wolf-Rayet star. Applying a similar analysis to the historical observations of SN 1994I, yields R \lesssim 1/4 Rsun for the progenitor radius of this supernova.
  • We present broadband multi-wavelength observations of GRB 080310 at redshift z = 2.43. This burst was bright and long-lived, and unusual in having extensive optical and near IR follow-up during the prompt phase. Using these data we attempt to simultaneously model the gamma-ray, X-ray, optical and IR emission using a series of prompt pulses and an afterglow component. Initial attempts to extrapolate the high energy model directly to lower energies for each pulse reveal that a spectral break is required between the optical regime and 0.3 keV to avoid over predicting the optical flux. We demonstrate that afterglow emission alone is insufficient to describe all morphology seen in the optical and IR data. Allowing the prompt component to dominate the early-time optical and IR and permitting each pulse to have an independent low energy spectral indices we produce an alternative scenario which better describes the optical light curve. This, however, does not describe the spectral shape of GRB 080310 at early times. The fit statistics for the prompt and afterglow dominated models are nearly identical making it difficult to favour either. However one enduring result is that both models require a low energy spectral index consistent with self absorption for at least some of the pulses identified in the high energy emission model.
  • We present the discovery and follow-up observations of a broad-line type-Ic supernova (SN), PTF 10bzf (SN 2010ah), detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) on 2010 February 23. The SN distance is \cong 218 Mpc, greater than GRB 980425 / SN 1998bw and GRB 060218 / SN 2006aj, but smaller than the other SNe firmly associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign with Palomar-48 inch, Palomar 60-inch, Gemini-N, Keck, Wise, Swift, the Allen Telescope Array, CARMA, WSRT, and EVLA. Here we compare the properties of PTF 10bzf with those of SN 1998bw and other broad-line SNe. The optical luminosity and spectral properties of PTF 10bzf suggest that this SN is intermediate, in kinetic energy and amount of 56Ni, between non GRB-associated SNe like 2002ap or 1997ef, and GRB-associated SNe like 1998bw. No X-ray or radio counterpart to PTF 10bzf was detected. X-ray upper-limits allow us to exclude the presence of an underlying X-ray afterglow as luminous as that of other SN-associated GRBs like GRB 030329 or GRB 031203. Early-time radio upper-limits do not show evidence for mildly-relativistic ejecta. Late-time radio upper-limits rule out the presence of an underlying off-axis GRB, with energy and wind density similar to the SN-associated GRB 030329 and GRB 031203. Finally, by performing a search for a GRB in the time window and at the position of PTF 10bzf, we find that no GRB in the IPN catalog could be associated with this SN.
  • The rate of image acquisition in modern synoptic imaging surveys has already begun to outpace the feasibility of keeping astronomers in the real-time discovery and classification loop. Here we present the inner workings of a framework, based on machine-learning algorithms, that captures expert training and ground-truth knowledge about the variable and transient sky to automate 1) the process of discovery on image differences and, 2) the generation of preliminary science-type classifications of discovered sources. Since follow-up resources for extracting novel science from fast-changing transients are precious, self-calibrating classification probabilities must be couched in terms of efficiencies for discovery and purity of the samples generated. We estimate the purity and efficiency in identifying real sources with a two-epoch image-difference discovery algorithm for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. Once given a source discovery, using machine-learned classification trained on PTF data, we distinguish between transients and variable stars with a 3.8% overall error rate (with 1.7% errors for imaging within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint). At >96% classification efficiency, the samples achieve 90% purity. Initial classifications are shown to rely primarily on context-based features, determined from the data itself and external archival databases. In the ~one year since autonomous operations, this discovery and classification framework has led to several significant science results, from outbursting young stars to subluminous Type IIP supernovae to candidate tidal disruption events. We discuss future directions of this approach, including the possible roles of crowdsourcing and the scalability of machine learning to future surveys such a the Large Synoptical Survey Telescope (LSST).
  • Supernovae (SNe) are stellar explosions driven by gravitational or thermonuclear energy, observed as electromagnetic radiation emitted over weeks or more. In all known SNe, this radiation comes from internal energy deposited in the outflowing ejecta by either radioactive decay of freshly-synthesized elements (typically 56Ni), stored heat deposited by the explosion shock in the envelope of a supergiant star, or interaction between the SN debris and slowly-moving, hydrogen-rich circumstellar material. Here we report on a new class of luminous SNe whose observed properties cannot be explained by any of these known processes. These include four new SNe we have discovered, and two previously unexplained events (SN 2005ap; SCP 06F6) that we can now identify as members. These SNe are all ~10 times brighter than SNe Ia, do not show any trace of hydrogen, emit significant ultra-violet (UV) flux for extended periods of time, and have late-time decay rates which are inconsistent with radioactivity. Our data require that the observed radiation is emitted by hydrogen-free material distributed over a large radius (~10^15 cm) and expanding at high velocities (>10^4 km s^-1). These long-lived, UV-luminous events can be observed out to redshifts z>4 and offer an excellent opportunity to study star formation in, and the interstellar medium of, primitive distant galaxies.
  • Variable X-ray and gamma-ray emission is characteristic of the most extreme physical processes in the Universe, and studying the sources of these energetic photons has been a major driver in astronomy for the past 50 years. Here we present multiwavelength observations of a unique gamma-ray selected transient, discovered by Swift, which was accompanied by bright emission across the electromagnetic spectrum, and whose properties are unlike any previously observed source. We pinpoint the event to the center of a small, star-forming galaxy at redshift z=0.3534. Its high-energy emission has lasted much longer than any gamma-ray burst, while its peak luminosity was about 100 times higher than the brightest active galactic nuclei. The association of the outburst with the center of its host galaxy suggests that this phenomenon has its origin in a new, rare mechanism associated with a massive black hole in the nucleus of a galaxy.
  • Type-IIn supernovae (SNe), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of a Type IIn SN, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by GALEX at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a time scale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n~10^10 cm^-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 solar mass per year) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe IIn.
  • SN 2007if was the third over-luminous SN Ia detected after 2003fg and 2006gz. We present the photometric and spectroscopic observations of the supernova and its host by ROTSE-III, HET and Keck. From the H_alpha line identified in the host spectra, we determine a redshift of 0.0736. At this distance, the supernova reached an absolute magnitude of -20.4, brighter than any other SNe Ia ever observed. If the source of luminosity is radioactive decay, a large amount of radioactive nickel (~1.5 solar masses) is required to power the peak luminosity, more than can be produced realistically in a Chandrasekhar mass progenitor. Low expansion velocity, similar to that of 2003fg, is also measured around the maximum light. The observations may suggest that SN 2007if was from a massive white dwarf progenitor, plausibly exploding with mass well beyond 1.4 solar masses. Alternatively, we investigate circumstellar interaction that may contribute to the excess luminosity.
  • Stars with initial masses 10 M_{solar} < M_{initial} < 100 M_{solar} fuse progressively heavier elements in their centres, up to inert iron. The core then gravitationally collapses to a neutron star or a black hole, leading to an explosion -- an iron-core-collapse supernova (SN). In contrast, extremely massive stars (M_{initial} > 140 M_{solar}), if such exist, have oxygen cores which exceed M_{core} = 50 M_{solar}. There, high temperatures are reached at relatively low densities. Conversion of energetic, pressure-supporting photons into electron-positron pairs occurs prior to oxygen ignition, and leads to a violent contraction that triggers a catastrophic nuclear explosion. Tremendous energies (>~ 10^{52} erg) are released, completely unbinding the star in a pair-instability SN (PISN), with no compact remnant. Transitional objects with 100 M_{solar} < M_{initial} < 140 M_{solar}, which end up as iron-core-collapse supernovae following violent mass ejections, perhaps due to short instances of the pair instability, may have been identified. However, genuine PISNe, perhaps common in the early Universe, have not been observed to date. Here, we present our discovery of SN 2007bi, a luminous, slowly evolving supernova located within a dwarf galaxy (~1% the size of the Milky Way). We measure the exploding core mass to be likely ~100 M_{solar}, in which case theory unambiguously predicts a PISN outcome. We show that >3 M_{solar} of radioactive 56Ni were synthesized, and that our observations are well fit by PISN models. A PISN explosion in the local Universe indicates that nearby dwarf galaxies probably host extremely massive stars, above the apparent Galactic limit, perhaps resulting from star formation processes similar to those that created the first stars in the Universe.
  • We report a series of extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations of the luminous M31 nova M31N 2007-11d. Our photometric observations coupled with previous measurements show that the nova took at least four days to reach peak brightness at R~14.9 on 20 Nov 2007 UT. After reaching maximum, the time for the nova to decline 2 and 3 magnitudes from maximum light (t_2 and t_3) was ~9.5 and ~13 days, respectively, establishing that M31N 2007-11d was a moderately fast declining nova. During the nova's evolution a total of three spectra were obtained. The first spectrum was obtained one day after maximum light (5 days post-discovery), followed by two additional spectra taken on the decline at two and three weeks post-maximum. The initial spectrum reveals narrow Balmer and Fe II emission with P Cygni profiles superimposed on a blue continuum. These data along with the spectra obtained on the subsequent decline clearly establish that M31N 2007-11d belongs to the Fe II spectroscopic class. The properties of M31N 2007-11d are discussed within the context of other luminous novae in M31, the Galaxy, and the LMC. Overall, M31N 2007-11d appears to be remarkably similar to Nova LMC 1991, which was another bright, slowly-rising, Fe II nova. A comparison of the available data for luminous extragalactic novae suggest that the >~4 day rise to maximum light seen in M31N 2007-11d may not be unusual, and that the rise times of luminous Galactic novae, usually assumed to be <~2 days, may have been underestimated.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic data of the peculiar SN 2005la, an object which shows an optical light curve with some luminosity fluctuations and spectra with comparably strong narrow hydrogen and helium lines, probably of circumstellar nature. The increasing full-width-half-maximum velocity of these lines is indicative of an acceleration of the circumstellar material. SN 2005la exhibits hybrid properties, sharing some similarities with both type IIn supernovae and 2006jc-like (type Ibn) events. We propose that the progenitor of SN 2005la was a very young Wolf-Rayet (WN-type) star which experimented mass ejection episodes shortly before core collapse.
  • We report spectroscopic observations of the nova M31N-2007-06b, which was found to be spatially coincident with the M31 globular cluster Bol 111. This nova is the first out of more than 700 discovered in M31 over the past century to be associated with one of the galaxy's globular clusters. A total of three spectra of the nova were obtained 3, 6, and 36 days post discovery. The data reveal broad (FWHM ~3000 km/s) Balmer, NII, and NIII emission lines, and show that the nova belongs to the He/N spectroscopic class. The He/N class of novae are relatively rare, making up roughly 15% of the novae with measured spectra in M31, and roughly 20-25% of the Galactic novae for which spectroscopic data are available. The implications of a nova, particularly an He/N nova, occurring in a globular cluster are discussed.
  • We present several cases of optical observations during gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which resulted in prompt limits but no detection of optical emission. These limits constrain the prompt optical flux densities and the optical brightness relative to the gamma-ray emission. The derived constraints fall within the range of properties observed in GRBs with prompt optical detections, though at the faint end of optical/gamma flux ratios. The presently accessible prompt optical limits do not require a different set of intrinsic or environmental GRB properties, relative to the events with prompt optical detections.
  • The ROTSE-IIIc telescope at the H.E.S.S. site, Namibia, obtained the earliest detection of optical emission from a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), beginning only 21.8 s from the onset of Swift GRB 050801. The optical lightcurve does not fade or brighten significantly over the first ~250 s, after which there is an achromatic break and the lightcurve declines in typical power-law fashion. The Swift/XRT also obtained early observations starting at 69 s after the burst onset. The X-ray lightcurve shows the same features as the optical lightcurve. These correlated variations in the early optical and X-ray emission imply a common origin in space and time. This behavior is difficult to reconcile with the standard models of early afterglow emission.
  • We present the unfiltered ROTSE-III light curve of the optical transient associated with GRB 050319 beginning 4 s after the cessation of gamma-ray activity. We fit a power-law function to the data using the revised trigger time given by Chincarini et al. (2005), and a smoothly broken power-law to the data using the original trigger disseminated through the GCN notices. Including the RAPTOR data from Wozniak et al. (2005), the best fit power-law indices are alpha=-0.854 (+/- 0.014) for the single power-law and alpha_1=-0.364 (+/- 0.020), alpha_2= -0.881 (+/- 0.030), with a break at t_b = 418 (+/- 30) s for the smoothly broken fit. We discuss the fit results with emphasis placed on the importance of knowing the true start time of the optical transient for this multi-peaked burst. As Swift continues to provide prompt GRB locations, it becomes more important to answer the question, "when does the afterglow begin" to correctly interpret the light curves.
  • We present lightcurves of the afterglow of GRB050502A, including very early data at t-t_{GRB} < 60s. The lightcurve is composed of unfiltered ROTSE-IIIb optical observations from 44s to 6h post-burst, R-band MDM observations from 1.6 to 8.4h post-burst, and PAIRITEL J H K_s observations from 0.6 to 2.6h post-burst. The optical lightcurve is fit by a broken power law, where t^{alpha} steepens from alpha = -1.13 +- 0.02 to alpha = -1.44 +- 0.02 at \~5700s. This steepening is consistent with the evolution expected for the passage of the cooling frequency nu_c through the optical band. Even in our earliest observation at 44s post-burst, there is no evidence that the optical flux is brighter than a backward extrapolation of the later power law would suggest. The observed decay indices and spectral index are consistent with either an ISM or a Wind fireball model, but slightly favor the ISM interpretation. The expected spectral index in the ISM interpretation is consistent within 1 sigma with the observed spectral index beta = -0.8 +- 0.1; the Wind interpretation would imply a slightly (~2 sigma) shallower spectral index than observed. A small amount of dust extinction at the source redshift could steepen an intrinsic spectrum sufficiently to account for the observed value of beta. In this picture, the early optical decay, with the peak at or below 4.7e14 Hz at 44s, requires very small electron and magnetic energy partitions from the fireball.
  • The ROTSE-IIIa telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, detected prompt optical emission from Swift GRB 050401. In this letter, we present observations of the early optical afterglow, first detected by the ROTSE-IIIa telescope 33 s after the start of gamma-ray emission, contemporaneous with the brightest peak of this emission. This GRB was neither exceptionally long nor bright. This is the first prompt optical detection of a GRB of typical duration and luminosity. We find that the early afterglow decay does not deviate significantly from the power-law decay observable at later times, and is uncorrelated with the prompt gamma-ray emission. We compare this detection with the other two GRBs with prompt observations, GRB 990123 and GRB 041219a. All three bursts exhibit quite different behavior at early times.