• We present LOFAR high-band data over the frequency range 115-189 MHz for the X-ray binary SS 433, obtained in an observing campaign from 2013 February - 2014 May. Our results include a deep, wide-field map, allowing a detailed view of the surrounding supernova remnant W 50 at low radio frequencies, as well as a light curve for SS 433 determined from shorter monitoring runs. The complex morphology of W 50 is in excellent agreement with previously published higher-frequency maps; we find additional evidence for a spectral turnover in the eastern wing, potentially due to foreground free-free absorption. Furthermore, SS 433 is tentatively variable at 150 MHz, with both a debiased modulation index of 11 per cent and a $\chi^2$ probability of a flat light curve of $8.2 \times 10^{-3}$. By comparing the LOFAR flux densities with contemporaneous observations carried out at 4800 MHz with the RATAN-600 telescope, we suggest that an observed $\sim$0.5-1 Jy rise in the 150-MHz flux density may correspond to sustained flaring activity over a period of approximately six months at 4800 MHz. However, the increase is too large to be explained with a standard synchrotron bubble model. We also detect a wealth of structure along the nearby Galactic plane, including the most complete detection to date of the radio shell of the candidate supernova remnant G 38.7-1.4. This further demonstrates the potential of supernova remnant studies with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.
  • We present the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array catalogue of 139 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). AMI observes at a central frequency of 15.7 GHz and is equipped with a fully automated rapid-response mode, which enables the telescope to respond to high-energy transients detected by Swift. On receiving a transient alert, AMI can be on-target within two minutes, scheduling later start times if the source is below the horizon. Further AMI observations are manually scheduled for several days following the trigger. The AMI GRB programme probes the early-time (< 1 day) radio properties of GRBs, and has obtained some of the earliest radio detections (GRB 130427A at 0.36 and GRB 130907A at 0.51 days post-burst). As all Swift GRBs visible to AMI are observed, this catalogue provides the first representative sample of GRB radio properties, unbiased by multi-wavelength selection criteria. We report the detection of six GRB radio afterglows that were not previously detected by other radio telescopes, increasing the rate of radio detections by 50% over an 18-month period. The AMI catalogue implies a Swift GRB radio detection rate of >15%, down to ~0.2 mJy/beam. However, scaling this by the fraction of GRBs AMI would have detected in the Chandra & Frail sample (all radio-observed GRBs between 1997 - 2011), it is possible ~44 - 56% of Swift GRBs are radio-bright, down to ~0.1 - 0.15 mJy/beam. This increase from the Chandra & Frail rate (~30%) is likely due to the AMI rapid-response mode, which allows observations to begin while the reverse-shock is contributing to the radio afterglow.
  • The candidate black hole X-ray binary Swift J1753.5-0127 faded to quiescence in 2016 November, after a prolonged outburst that was discovered in 2005. Nearly three months later the system displayed renewed activity that lasted through 2017 July. Here, we present radio and X-ray monitoring over ~3 months of the renewed activity to study the coupling between the jet and the inner regions of the disk/jet system. Our observations cover low X-ray luminosities that have not historically been well-sampled (Lx~2e33 - 1e36 erg/s; 1-10 keV), including time periods when the system was both brightening and fading. At these low luminosities Swift J1753.5-0127 occupies a parameter space in the radio/X-ray luminosity plane that is comparable to "canonical" systems (e.g., GX 339-4), regardless of whether the system was brightening or fading, even though during its >11-year outburst Swift J1753.5-0127 emitted less radio emission from its jet than expected. We discuss implications for the existence of a single radio/X-ray luminosity correlation for black hole X-ray binaries at the lowest luminosities (Lx < 1e35 erg/s), and we compare to supermassive black holes. Our campaign includes the lowest luminosity quasi-simultaneous radio/X-ray detection to date for a black hole X-ray binary during its rise out of quiescence, thanks to early notification from optical monitoring combined with fast responses from sensitive multiwavelength facilities.
  • We have shown previously that a broad correlation between the peak radio luminosity and the variability time-scales, approximately L ~ t^5, exists for variable synchrotron emitting sources and that different classes of astrophysical source occupy different regions of luminosity and time-scale space. Based on those results, we investigate whether the most basic information available for a newly discovered radio variable or transient - their rise and/or decline rate - can be used to set initial constraints on the class of events from which they originate. We have analysed a sample of ~ 800 synchrotron flares, selected from light-curves of ~ 90 sources observed at 5-8 GHz, representing a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from flare stars to supermassive black holes. Selection of outbursts from the noisy radio light-curves has been done automatically in order to ensure reproducibility of results. The distribution of rise/decline rates for the selected flares is modelled as a Gaussian probability distribution for each class of object, and further convolved with estimated areal density of that class in order to correct for the strong bias in our sample. We show in this way that comparing the measured variability time-scale of a radio transient/variable of unknown origin can provide an early, albeit approximate, classification of the object, and could form part of a suite of measurements used to provide early categorisation of such events. Finally, we also discuss the effect scintillating sources will have on our ability to classify events based on their variability time-scales.
  • Black hole X-ray binaries undergo occasional outbursts caused by changing inner accretion flows. Here we report high-angular resolution radio observations of the 2013 outburst of the black hole candidate X-ray binary system J1908+094, using data from the VLBA and EVN. We show that following a hard-to-soft state transition, we detect moving jet knots that appear asymmetric in morphology and brightness, and expand to become laterally resolved as they move away from the core, along an axis aligned approximately $-11$\degree\ east of north. We initially see only the southern component, whose evolution gives rise to a 15-mJy radio flare and generates the observed radio polarization. This fades and becomes resolved out after 4 days, after which a second component appears to the north, moving in the opposite direction. From the timing of the appearance of the knots relative to the X-ray state transition, a 90\degree\ swing of the inferred magnetic field orientation, the asymmetric appearance of the knots, their complex and evolving morphology, and their low speeds, we interpret the knots as working surfaces where the jets impact the surrounding medium. This would imply a substantially denser environment surrounding XTE J1908+094 than has been inferred to exist around the microquasar sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40.
  • We present a radio light curve of supernova (SN) 2014C taken with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) Large Array at 15.7 GHz. Optical observations presented by Milisavljevic et al. demonstrated that SN 2014C metamorphosed from a stripped-envelope Type Ib SN into a strongly interacting Type IIn SN within 1 year. The AMI light curve clearly shows two distinct radio peaks, the second being a factor of 4 times more luminous than the first peak. This double bump morphology indicates two distinct phases of mass-loss from the progenitor star with the transition between density regimes occurring at 100-200 days. This reinforces the interpretation that SN 2014C exploded in a low density region before encountering a dense Hydrogen-rich shell of circumstellar material that was likely ejected by the progenitor prior to the explosion. The AMI flux measurements of the first light curve bump are the only reported observations taken within ~50 to ~125 days post-explosion, before the blast-wave encountered the Hydrogen shell. Simplistic synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and free-free absorption (FFA) modelling suggest that some physical properties of SN 2014C, such as the mass-loss rate, are consistent with the properties of other Type Ibc and IIn SNe. However, our single frequency data does not allow us to distinguish between these two models, which implies they are likely too simplistic to describe the complex environment surrounding this event. Lastly, we present the precise radio location of SN 2014C obtained with eMERLIN, which will be useful for future VLBI observations of the SN.
  • The connection between accretion and jet production in accreting white dwarf binary systems, especially dwarf novae, is not well understood. Radio wavelengths provide key insights into the mechanisms responsible for accelerating electrons, including jets and outflows. Here we present densely-sampled radio coverage, obtained with the Arcminute MicroKelvin Imager Large Array, of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its February 2016 anomalous outburst. The outburst displayed a slower rise (3 days per mag) in the optical than typical ones, and lasted for more than 3 weeks. Rapid radio flaring on timescales <1 hour was seen throughout the outburst. The most intriguing behavior in the radio was towards the end of the outburst where a fast, luminous ("giant"), flare peaking at ~20 mJy and lasting for 15 minutes was observed. This is the first time that such a flare has been observed in SS Cyg, and insufficient coverage could explain its non-detection in previous outbursts. These data, together with past radio observations, are consistent with synchrotron emission from plasma ejection events as being the origin of the radio flares. However, the production of the giant flare during the declining accretion rate phase remains unexplained within the standard accretion-jet framework and appears to be markedly different to similar patterns of behavior in X-ray binaries.
  • After more than 26 years in quiescence, the black hole transient V404 Cyg went into a luminous outburst in June 2015, and additional activity was detected in late December of the same year. Here, we present an optical spectroscopic follow-up of the December mini-outburst, together with X-ray, optical and radio monitoring that spanned more than a month. Strong flares with gradually increasing intensity are detected in the three spectral ranges during the ~10 days following the Swift trigger. Our optical spectra reveal the presence of a fast outflowing wind, as implied by the detection of a P-Cyg profile (He I - 5876 A) with a terminal velocity of ~2500 km/s. Nebular-like spectra -- with an H_alpha equivalent width of ~500 A -- are also observed. All these features are similar to those seen during the main June 2015 outburst. Thus, the fast optical wind simultaneous with the radio jet is most likely present in every V404 Cyg outburst. Finally, we report on the detection of a strong radio flare in late January 2016, when X-ray and optical monitoring had stopped due to Sun constraints.
  • We report on radio and X-ray monitoring observations of the BHC Swift J1753.5-0127 taken over a ~10 year period. Presented are daily radio observations at 15 GHz with the AMI-LA and X-ray data from Swift XRT and BAT. Also presented is a deep 2hr JVLA observation taken in an unusually low-luminosity soft-state (with a low disk temperature). We show that although the source has remained relatively radio-quiet compared to XRBs with a similar X-ray luminosity in the hard-state, the power-law relationship scales as $\zeta=0.96\pm0.06$ i.e. slightly closer to what has been considered for radiatively inefficient accretion disks. We also place the most stringent limit to date on the radio-jet quenching in an XRB soft-state, showing the connection of the jet quenching to the X-ray power-law component; the radio flux in the soft-state was found to be $<21~\mu$Jy, which is a quenching factor of $\gtrsim25$
  • The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended HI halos and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make VLBI observations
  • We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disk material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.
  • Accretion of matter onto black holes is universally associated with strong radiative feedback and powerful outflows. In particular, black hole transients show outflows whose properties are strongly coupled to those of the accretion flow. This includes X-ray winds of ionized material, expelled from the accretion disc encircling the black hole, and collimated radio jets. Very recently, a distinct optical variability pattern has been reported in the transient black hole transient V404 Cyg, and interpreted as disrupted mass flow into the inner regions of its large accretion disc. Here, we report on the discovery of a sustained outer accretion disc wind in V404 Cyg, which is unlike any seen previously. We find that the outflowing wind is neutral, has a large covering factor, expands at 1% of the speed of light and triggers a nebular phase once accretion sharply drops and the ejecta become optically thin. The large expelled mass (> 10^-8 Msun) indicates that the outburst was prematurely ended when a sizeable fraction of the outer disc was depleted by the wind, detaching the inner regions from the rest of the disc. The luminous, but brief, accretion phases shown by transients with large accretion discs imply that this outflow is most likely a new fundamental ingredient regulating mass accretion onto black holes.
  • The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent ($\propto \nu^{-0.4}$), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.
  • We report on the results of a search for radio transients between 115 and 190\,MHz with the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR). Four fields have been monitored with cadences between 15 minutes and several months. A total of 151 images were obtained, giving a total survey area of 2275 deg$^2$. We analysed our data using standard LOFAR tools and searched for radio transients using the LOFAR Transients Pipeline (TraP). No credible radio transient candidate has been detected; however, we are able to set upper limits on the surface density of radio transient sources at low radio frequencies. We also show that low-frequency radio surveys are more sensitive to steep-spectrum coherent transient sources than GHz radio surveys. We used two new statistical methods to determine the upper limits on the transient surface density. One is free of assumptions on the flux distribution of the sources, while the other assumes a power-law distribution in flux and sets more stringent constraints on the transient surface density. Both of these methods provide better constraints than the approach used in previous works. The best value for the upper limit we can set for the transient surface density, using the method assuming a power-law flux distribution, is 1.3$\cdot$10$^{-3}$ deg$^{-2}$ for transients brighter than 0.3 Jy with a time-scale of 15 min, at a frequency of 150 MHz. We also calculated for the first time upper limits for the transient surface density for transients of different time-scales. We find that the results can differ by orders of magnitude from previously reported, simplified estimates.
  • Nov. 30, 2015 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    We present the results of a four-month campaign searching for low-frequency radio transients near the North Celestial Pole with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), as part of the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS). The data were recorded between 2011 December and 2012 April and comprised 2149 11-minute snapshots, each covering 175 deg^2. We have found one convincing candidate astrophysical transient, with a duration of a few minutes and a flux density at 60 MHz of 15-25 Jy. The transient does not repeat and has no obvious optical or high-energy counterpart, as a result of which its nature is unclear. The detection of this event implies a transient rate at 60 MHz of 3.9 (+14.7, -3.7) x 10^-4 day^-1 deg^-2, and a transient surface density of 1.5 x 10^-5 deg^-2, at a 7.9-Jy limiting flux density and ~10-minute time-scale. The campaign data were also searched for transients at a range of other time-scales, from 0.5 to 297 min, which allowed us to place a range of limits on transient rates at 60 MHz as a function of observation duration.
  • The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.
  • We present the discovery of two new X-ray transients in archival Chandra data. The first transient, XRT 110103, occurred in January 2011 and shows a sharp rise of at least three orders of magnitude in count rate in less than 10 s, a flat peak for about 20 s and decays by two orders of magnitude in the next 60 s. We find no optical or infrared counterpart to this event in preexisting survey data or in an observation taken by the SIRIUS instrument at the Infrared Survey Facility 2.1 yr after the transient, providing limiting magnitudes of J>18.1, H>17.6 and Ks>16.3. This event shows similarities to the transient previously reported in Jonker et al. which was interpreted as the possible tidal disruption of a white dwarf by an intermediate mass black hole. We discuss the possibility that these transients originate from the same type of event. If we assume these events are related a rough estimate of the rates gives 1.4*10^5 per year over the whole sky with a peak 0.3-7 keV X-ray flux greater than 2*10^-10 erg cm^-2 s^-1 . The second transient, XRT 120830, occurred in August 2012 and shows a rise of at least three orders of magnitude in count rate and a subsequent decay of around one order of magnitude all within 10 s, followed by a slower quasi-exponential decay over the remaining 30 ks of the observation. We detect a likely infrared counterpart with magnitudes J=16.70+/-0.06, H=15.92+/-0.04 and Ks=15.37+/-0.06 which shows an average proper motion of 74+/-19 milliarcsec per year compared to archival 2MASS observations. The JHKs magnitudes, proper motion and X-ray flux of XRT 120830 are consistent with a bright flare from a nearby late M or early L dwarf.
  • The universal link between the processes of accretion and ejection leads to the formation of jets and outflows around accreting compact objects. Incoherent synchrotron emission from these outflows can be observed from a wide range of accreting binaries, including black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Monitoring the evolution of the radio emission during their sporadic outbursts provides important insights into the launching of jets, and, when coupled with the behaviour of the source at shorter wavelengths, probes the underlying connection with the accretion process. Radio observations can also probe the impact of jets/outflows (including other explosive events such as magnetar giant flares) on the ambient medium, quantifying their kinetic feedback. The high sensitivity of the SKA will open up new parameter space, enabling the monitoring of accreting stellar-mass compact objects from their bright, Eddington-limited outburst states down to the lowest-luminosity quiescent levels, whose intrinsic faintness has to date precluded detailed studies. A census of quiescently accreting black holes will also constrain binary evolution processes. By enabling us to extend our existing investigations of black hole jets to the fainter jets from neutron star and white dwarf systems, the SKA will permit comparative studies to determine the role of the compact object in jet formation. The high sensitivity, wide field of view and multi-beaming capability of the SKA will enable the detection and monitoring of all bright flaring transients in the observable local Universe, including the ULXs, ... [Abridged] This chapter reviews the science goals outlined above, demonstrating the progress that will be made by the SKA. We also discuss the potential of the astrometric and imaging observations that would be possible should a significant VLBI component be included in the SKA.
  • We present results from three recent XMM-Newton observations of GX 339$-$4 in the low/hard state, taken during the decay of a bright (peak $\sim 0.05$ L$_{\rm Edd}$) failed outburst. Uniquely, these are the first XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observations of this source using an imaging mode, which significantly enhances the quality of the data at hand. In particular, thanks to the larger available bandpass, this allows an unprecedented constraint of the thermal accretion disc component, and the level of photoelectric absorption. We simultaneously measured the inner radius of the accretion disc via the broadened Fe K$\alpha$ line and the disc component. The two methods agree, and the measured radii show good consistency over the three epochs. We find that the inner radius is at 20-30 $r_{\rm g}$, adding to the growing direct evidence for truncation of the inner accretion disc in the low/hard state.
  • The nature of accretion onto stellar mass black holes in the low/hard state remains unresolved, with some evidence suggesting that the inner accretion disc is truncated and replaced by a hot flow. However, the detection of relativistic broadened Fe emission lines, even at relatively low luminosities, seems to require an accretion disc extending fully to its innermost stable circular orbit. Modelling such features is however highly susceptible to degeneracies, which could easily bias any interpretation. We present the first systematic study of the Fe line region to track how the inner accretion disc evolves in the low/hard state of the black hole GX 339$-$4. Our four observations display increased broadening of the Fe line over two magnitudes in luminosity, which we use to track any variation of the disc inner radius. We find that the disc extends closer to the black hole at higher luminosities, but is consistent with being truncated throughout the entire low/hard state, a result which renders black hole spin estimates inaccurate at these stages of the outburst. Furthermore, we show that the evolution of our spectral inner disc radius estimates corresponds very closely to the trend of the break frequency in Fourier power spectra, supporting the interpretation of a truncated and evolving disc in the hard state.
  • AX J1745.6-2901 is a high-inclination (eclipsing) neutron star Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) located less than ~1.5 arcmin from Sgr A*. Ongoing monitoring campaigns have targeted Sgr A* frequently and these observations also cover AX J1745.6-2901. We present here an X-ray analysis of AX J1745.6-2901 using a large dataset of 38 XMM-Newton observations, including eleven which caught AX J1745.6-2901 in outburst. Fe K absorption is clearly seen when AX J1745.6-2901 is in the soft state, but disappears during the hard state. The variability of these absorption features does not appear to be due to changes in the ionizing continuum. The small Kalpha/Kbeta ratio of the equivalent widths of the Fe xxv and Fe xxvi lines suggests that the column densities and turbulent velocities of the absorbing ionised plasma are in excess of N_H ~ 10^23 cm^-2 and v_turb >~ 500 km s^-1. These findings strongly support a connection between the wind (Fe K absorber) and the accretion state of the binary. These results reveal strong similarities between AX J1745.6-2901 and the eclipsing neutron star LMXB, EXO 0748-676, as well as with high-inclination black hole binaries, where winds (traced by the same Fe K absorption features) are observed only during the accretion-disc-dominated soft states, and disappear during the hard states characterised by jet emission.
  • The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 has been recently the subject of multiwavelength monitoring campaigns which revealed that an accretion disc has formed around the neutron star (since 2013 June). We present here the results of X-ray and UV observations carried out by the Swift satellite between 2013 October and 2014 May, and of optical and NIR observations performed with the REM telescope, the Liverpool Telescope, the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro M\'artir Observatory and the 1.52-m telescope at the Loiano observing station. The X-ray spectrum is well described by an absorbed power law, which is softer than the previous quiescent epoch (up to 2013 June). The strong correlation between the X-ray and the UV emissions indicates that the same mechanism should be responsible for part of the emission in these bands. Optical and infrared photometric observations show that the companion star is strongly irradiated. Double-peaked emission lines in the optical spectra provide compelling evidence for the presence of an outer accretion disc too. The spectral energy distribution from IR to X-rays is well modelled if the contributions from the companion, the disc and the intra-binary shock emission are all considered. Our extensive data set can be interpreted in terms of an engulfed radio pulsar: the radio pulsar is still active, but undetectable in the radio band due to a large amount of ionized material surrounding the compact object. X-rays and gamma-rays are produced in an intra-binary shock front between the relativistic pulsar wind and matter from the companion and an outer accretion disc. The intense spin-down power irradiates the disc and the companion star, accounting for the UV and optical emissions.
  • [Abridged] We report on deep, coordinated radio and X-ray observations of the black hole X-ray binary XTE J1118+480 in quiescence. The source was observed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for a total of 17.5 hrs at 5.3 GHz, yielding a 4.8 \pm 1.4 microJy radio source at a position consistent with the binary system. At a distance of 1.7 kpc, this corresponds to an integrated radio luminosity between 4-8E+25 erg/s, depending on the spectral index. This is the lowest radio luminosity measured for any accreting black hole to date. Simultaneous observations with the Chandra X-ray Telescope detected XTE J1118+480 at 1.2E-14 erg/s/cm^2 (1-10 keV), corresponding to an Eddington ratio of ~4E-9 for a 7.5 solar mass black hole. Combining these new measurements with data from the 2005 and 2000 outbursts available in the literature, we find evidence for a relationship of the form ellr=alpha+beta*ellx (where ell denotes logarithmic luminosities), with beta=0.72\pm0.09. XTE J1118+480 is thus the third system, together with GX339-4 and V404 Cyg, for which a tight, non-linear radio/X-ray correlation has been reported over more than 5 dex in ellx. We then perform a clustering and linear regression analysis on what is arguably the most up-to-date collection of coordinated radio and X-ray luminosity measurements from quiescent and hard state black hole X-ray binaries, including 24 systems. At variance with previous results, a two-cluster description is statistically preferred only for random errors <=0.3 dex in both ellr and ellx, a level which we argue can be easily reached when the known spectral shape/distance uncertainties and intrinsic variability are accounted for. A linear regression analysis performed on the whole data set returns a best-fitting slope beta=0.61\pm0.03 and intrinsic scatter sigma_0=0.31\pm 0.03 dex.
  • Swift J1357.2-0933 is the first confirmed very faint black hole X-ray transient and has a short estimated orbital period of 2.8 hr. We observed Swift J1357.2-0933 for ~50 ks with XMM-Newton in 2013 July during its quiescent state. The source is clearly detected at a 0.5-10 keV unabsorbed flux of ~3x10^-15 erg cm-2 s-1. If the source is located at a distance of 1.5 kpc (as suggested in the literature), this would imply a luminosity of ~8x10^29 erg s-1, making it the faintest detected quiescent black hole LMXB. This would also imply that there is no indication of a reversal in the quiescence X-ray luminosity versus orbital period diagram down to 2.8 hr, as has been predicted theoretically and recently supported by the detection of the 2.4 hr orbital period black hole MAXI J1659-152 at a 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity of ~ 1.2 x 10^31 erg s-1. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the distance of Swift J1357.2-0933 and it may be as distant as 6 kpc. In this case, its quiescent luminosity would be Lx ~ 1.3 x 10^31 erg s-1, i.e., similar to MAXI J1659-152 and hence it would support the existence of such a bifurcation period. We also detected the source in optical at r' ~22.3 mag with the Liverpool telescope, simultaneously to our X-ray observation. The X-ray/optical luminosity ratio of Swift J1357.2-0933 agrees with the expected value for a black hole at this range of quiescent X-ray luminosities.
  • High resolution X-ray spectra of accreting stellar mass Black Holes reveal the presence of accretion disc winds, traced by high ionisation Fe K lines. These winds appear to have an equatorial geometry and to be observed only during disc dominated states in which the radio jet is absent. Accreting neutron star systems also show equatorial high ionisation absorbers. However, the presence of any correlation with the accretion state has not been previously tested. We have studied EXO 0748-676, a transient neutron star system, for which we can reliably determine the accretion state, in order to investigate the Fe K absorption/accretion state/jet connection. Not one of twenty X-ray spectra obtained in the hard state revealed any significant Fe K absorption line. However, intense Fe ${\scriptsize{\rm XXV}}$ and Fe ${\scriptsize{\rm XXVI}}$ (as well as a rarely observed Fe ${\scriptsize{\rm XXIII}}$ line plus S ${\scriptsize{\rm XVI}}$; a blend of S ${\scriptsize{\rm XVI}}$ and Ar ${\scriptsize{\rm XVII}}$; Ca ${\scriptsize{\rm XX}}$ and Ca ${\scriptsize{\rm XIX}}$, possibly produced by the same high ionisation material) absorption lines ($EW_{\rm Fe~{XXIII-XXV}}=31\pm3$ eV, $EW_{\rm Fe~XXVI}=8\pm3$ eV) are clearly detected during the only soft state observation. This suggests that the connection between Fe K absorption and states (and anticorrelation between the presence of Fe K absorption and jets) is also valid for EXO 0748-676 and therefore it is not a unique property of black hole systems but a more general characteristic of accreting sources.