• We present elemental abundance analysis of high-resolution spectra for five giant stars, deriving Fe, Mg, Al, C, N, O, Si and Ce abundances, and spatially located within the innermost regions of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6522, based on H-band spectra taken with the multi-object APOGEEnorth spectrograph from the SDSS-IV Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. Of the five cluster candidates, four stars are confirmed to have second-generation (SG) abundance patterns, with the basic pattern of depletion in C and Mg simultaneous with enrichment in N and Al as seen in other SG globular cluster populations at similar metallicity. In agreement with the most recent optical studies, the NGC 6522 stars analyzed exhibit (when available) only mild overabundances of the s-process element Ce, contradicting the idea of the NGC 6522 stars being formed from gas enriched by spinstars and indicating that other stellar sources such as massive AGB stars could be the primary intra-cluster medium polluters. The peculiar abundance signature of SG stars have been observed in our data, confirming the presence of multiple generations of stars in NGC 6522.
  • We report the peculiar chemical abundance patterns of eleven atypical Milky Way (MW) field red giant stars observed by the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). These atypical giants exhibit strong Al and N enhancements accompanied by C and Mg depletions, strikingly similar to those observed in the so-called second-generation (SG) stars of globular clusters (GCs). Remarkably, we find low-Mg abundances ([Mg/Fe]$<$0.0) together with strong Al and N overabundances in the majority (5/7) of the metal-rich ([Fe/H]$\gtrsim - 1.0$) sample stars, which is at odds with actual observations of SG stars in Galactic CGs of similar metallicities. This chemical pattern is unique and unprecedented among MW stars, posing urgent questions about its origin. These atypical stars could be former SG stars of dissolved GCs formed with intrinsically lower abundances of Mg and enriched Al (subsequently self-polluted by massive AGB stars) or the result of exotic binary systems. We speculate that the stars Mg-deficiency as well as the orbital properties suggest that they could have an extragalactic origin. This discovery should guide future dedicated spectroscopic searches of atypical stellar chemical patterns in our Galaxy; a fundamental step forward to understand the Galactic formation and evolution.
  • We report on detection, from observations obtained with the APOGEE spectroscopic survey, of a metal-poor ([Fe/H] $= -1.3$ dex) field giant star with an extreme Mg-Al abundance ratio ([Mg/Fe] $= -0.31$ dex; [Al/Fe] $= 1.49$ dex). Such low Mg/Al ratios are seen only among the second-generation population of globular clusters, and are not present among Galactic disk field stars. The light element abundances of this star, 2M16011638-1201525, suggest that it could have been born in a globular cluster. We explore several origin scenarios, in particular studying the orbit of the star to check the probability of it being kinematically related to known globular clusters. We performed simple orbital integrations assuming the estimated distance of 2M16011638-1201525 and the available six-dimensional phase-space coordinates of 63 globular clusters, looking for close encounters in the past with a minimum distance approach within the tidal radius of each cluster. We found a very low probability that 2M16011638-1201525 was ejected from most globular clusters; however, we note that the best progenitor candidate to host this star is globular cluster $\omega$ Centauri (NGC 5139). Our dynamical investigation demonstrates that 2M16011638-1201525 reaches a distance $|Z_{max}| < 3 $ kpc from the Galactic plane and a minimum and maximum approach to the Galactic center of $R_{min}<0.62$ kpc and $R_{max}<7.26$ kpc in an eccentric ($e\sim0.53$) and retrograde orbit. Since the extreme chemical anomaly of 2M16011638-1201525 has also been observed in halo field stars, this object could also be considered a halo contaminant, likely been ejected into the Milky Way disk from the halo. We conclude that, 2M16011638-20152 is also kinematically consistent with the disk but chemically consistent with halo field stars.
  • With the advent of the space missions CoRoT and Kepler, it has become feasible to determine precise asteroseismic masses and ages for large samples of red-giant stars. In this paper, we present the CoRoGEE dataset -- obtained from CoRoT lightcurves for 606 red giant stars in two fields of the Galactic disc which have been co-observed for an ancillary project of APOGEE. We have used the Bayesian parameter estimation code PARAM to calculate distances, extinctions, masses, and ages for these stars in a homogeneous analysis, resulting in relative statistical uncertainties of $\sim2\%$ in distance, $\sim4\%$ in radius, $\sim9\%$ in mass and $\sim25\%$ in age. We also assess systematic age uncertainties due to different input physics and mass loss. We discuss the correlation between ages and chemical abundance patterns of field stars over a large radial range of the Milky Way's disc (5 kpc $<R_{\rm Gal}<$ 14 kpc), focussing on the [$\alpha$/Fe]-[Fe/H]-age plane in five radial bins of the Galactic disc. We find an overall agreement with the expectations of chemical-evolution models computed before the present data were available, especially for the outer regions. However, our data also indicate that a significant fraction of stars now observed near and beyond the Solar Neighbourhood migrated from inner regions. Mock CoRoGEE observations of a chemo-dynamical Milky Way disc model show that the number of high-metallicity stars in the outer disc is too high to be accounted for even by the strong radial mixing present in the model. The mock observations also reveal that the age distribution of the [$\alpha$/Fe]-enhanced sequence in the CoRoGEE inner-disc field is much broader than expected from a combination of radial mixing and observational errors. We suggest that a thick disc/bulge component that formed stars for more than 3 Gyr may account for these discrepancies.
  • We examine the distribution of the [O/Fe] abundance ratio in stars across the Galactic disk using H-band spectra from the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We minimize systematic errors by considering groups of stars with similar atmospheric parameters. The APOGEE measurements in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 reveal that the square root of the star-to-star cosmic variance in the oxygen-to-iron ratio at a given metallicity is about 0.03-0.04 dex in both the thin and thick disk. This is about twice as high as the spread found for solar twins in the immediate solar neighborhood and the difference is probably associated to the wider range of galactocentric distances spanned by APOGEE stars. We quantify the uncertainties by examining the spread among stars with the same parameters in clusters; these errors are a function of effective temperature and metallicity, ranging between 0.005 dex at 4000 K and solar metallicity, to about 0.03 dex at 4500 K and [Fe/H]= -0.6. We argue that measuring the spread in [O/Fe] and other abundance ratios provides strong constraints for models of Galactic chemical evolution.
  • We report the discovery of a group of apparently young CoRoT red-giant stars exhibiting enhanced [alpha/Fe] abundance ratios (as determined from APOGEE spectra) with respect to Solar values. Their existence is not explained by standard chemical evolution models of the Milky Way, and shows that the chemical-enrichment history of the Galactic disc is more complex. We find similar stars in previously published samples for which isochrone-ages could be robustly obtained, although in smaller relative numbers, which could explain why these stars have not received prior attention. The young [alpha/Fe]-rich stars are much more numerous in the CoRoT-APOGEE (CoRoGEE) inner-field sample than in any other high-resolution sample available at present, as only CoRoGEE can explore the inner-disc regions and provide ages for its field stars. The kinematic properties of the young [$\alpha$/Fe]-rich stars are not clearly thick-disc like, despite their rather large distances from the Galactic mid-plane. Our tentative interpretation of these and previous intriguing observations in the Milky Way is that these stars were formed close to the end of the Galactic bar, near corotation -- a region where gas can be kept inert for longer times, compared to other regions shocked more frequently by the passage of spiral arms. Moreover, that is where the mass return from older inner-disc stellar generations should be maximal (according to an inside-out disc-formation scenario), further diluting the in-situ gas. Other possibilities to explain these observations (e.g., a recent gas-accretion event) are also discussed.
  • We present spectra of the nuclear regions of 50 nearby (D = 1 - 92 Mpc, median = 20 Mpc) galaxies of morphological types E to Sm. The spectra, obtained with the Gemini Near-IR Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope, cover a wavelength range of approximately 0.85-2.5 microns at R~1300--1800. There is evidence that most of the galaxies host an active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the range of AGN luminosities (log (L2-10 keV [erg/s]) = 37.0-43.2) in the sample means that the spectra display a wide variety of features. Some nuclei, especially the Seyferts, exhibit a rich emission-line spectrum. Other objects, in particular the type 2 Low Ionisation Nuclear Emission Region galaxies, show just a few, weak emission lines, allowing a detailed view of the underlying stellar population. These spectra display numerous absorption features sensitive to the stellar initial mass function, as well as molecular bands arising in cool stars, and many other atomic absorption lines. We compare the spectra of subsets of galaxies known to be characterised by intermediate-age and old stellar populations, and find clear differences in their absorption lines and continuum shapes. We also examine the effect of atmospheric water vapor on the signal-to-noise ratio achieved in regions between the conventional NIR atmospheric windows, of potential interest to those planning observations of redshifted emission lines or other features affected by telluric H2O. Further exploitation of this data set is in progress, and the reduced spectra and data reduction tools are made available to the community.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • The SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a three year survey that is collecting 100,000 high-resolution spectra in the near-IR across multiple Galactic populations. To derive stellar parameters and chemical compositions from this massive data set, the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been developed. Here, we describe empirical calibrations of stellar parameters presented in the first SDSS-III APOGEE data release (DR10). These calibrations were enabled by observations of 559 stars in 20 globular and open clusters. The cluster observations were supplemented by observations of stars in NASA's Kepler field that have well determined surface gravities from asteroseismic analysis. We discuss the accuracy and precision of the derived stellar parameters, considering especially effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity; we also briefly discuss the derived results for the abundances of the alpha-elements, carbon, and nitrogen. Overall, we find that ASPCAP achieves reasonably accurate results for temperature and metallicity, but suffers from systematic errors in surface gravity. We derive calibration relations that bring the raw ASPCAP results into better agreement with independently determined stellar parameters. The internal scatter of ASPCAP parameters within clusters suggests that, metallicities are measured with a precision better than 0.1 dex, effective temperatures better than 150 K, and surface gravities better than 0.2 dex. The understanding provided by the clusters and Kepler giants on the current accuracy and precision will be invaluable for future improvements of the pipeline.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object NIR APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations are used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey and results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that is publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present RVs and vsini of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsini precision of ~2 km/s and a measurement floor at vsini = 4 km/s. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for vsini and RV variability (at ~100-200 m/s), and will advance the target selection for planned RV and photometric searches for low mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as HPF, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and AO imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution H-band APOGEE spectra provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and RVs for over 1400 stars spanning spectral types of M0-L0, providing the largest set of NIR M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsini values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m/s for bright M dwarfs. We present preliminary results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.
  • We present a combination of high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope and wide-field ground-based and Galaxy Evolution Explorer data of the Galactic Globular Cluster M10 (NGC6254). By using this large data-set we determined the center of gravity of the cluster and we built its density profile from star counts over its entire radial extension. We find that the density profile is well reproduced by a single-mass King model with structural parameters c=1.41 and r_c=41". We also studied the Blue Straggler Star population and its radial distribution. We count a total number of 120 BSS within the tidal radius. Their radial distribution is bimodal: highly peaked in the cluster center, decreasing at intermediate distances and rising again outwards. We discuss these results in the context of the dynamical clock scheme presented by Ferraro et al. (2012) and of recent results about the radial distribution of binary systems in this cluster.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) integrated colors of 44 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) observed with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in both FUV and NUV bands. We find for the first time that GCs associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy have (FUV-V) colors systematically redder than GGCs with the same metallicity. M31 GCs show almost the same UV colors as GGCs, while M87 are systematically bluer. We speculate about the presence of an interesting trend, suggesting that the UV color of GCs may be correlated with the mass of the host galaxy, in the sense that more massive galaxies possess bluer clusters.
  • Abundance variations in moderately metal-rich globular clusters can give clues about the formation and chemical enrichment of globular clusters. CN, CH, Na, Mg and Al indices in spectra of 89 stars of the template metal-rich globular cluster M71 are measured and implications on internal mixing are discussed. Stars from the turn-off up to the Red Giant Branch (0.87 $<$ log g $<$ 4.65) observed with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph at the Gemini-North telescope are analyzed. Radial velocities, colours, effective temperatures, gravities and spectral indices are determined for the sample. Previous findings related to the CN bimodality and CN-CH anticorrelation in stars of M71 are confirmed. We also find a CN-Na correlation, and Al-Na, as well as an Mg$_2$-Al anticorrelation. A combination of convective mixing and a primordial pollution by AG or massive stars in the early stages of globular cluster formation is required to explain the observations.
  • We use a sample of 7 starburst galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.8) with observations ranging from the observed ultraviolet to 1.4 GHz, to compare the star formation rate (SFR) estimators which are used in the different wavelength regimes. We find that extinction corrected Halpha underestimates the SFR, and the degree of this underestimation increases with the infrared luminosity of the galaxies. Galaxies with very different levels of dust extinction as measured with SFR(IR)/SFR(Halpha, uncorrected for extinction) present a similar attenuation A[Halpha], as if the Balmer lines probed a different region of the galaxy than the one responsible for the bulk of the IR luminosity for large SFRs. In addition, SFR estimates derived from [OII]3727 match very well those inferred from Halpha after applying the metallicity correction derived from local galaxies. SFRs estimated from the UV luminosities show a dichotomic behavior, similar to that previously reported by other authors in galaxies at z <~ 0.4. Here we extend this result up to z ~ 0.8. Finally, one of the studied objects is a luminous compact galaxy (LCG) that may be suffering similar dust-enshrouded star formation episodes. These results highlight the relevance of quantifying the actual L(IR) of LCGs, as well as that of a much larger and generic sample of luminous infrared galaxies, which will be possible after the launch of SIRTF.
  • Low resolution spectra of 23 stars towards the bulge globular clusters NGC 6528 and NGC 6553 are analysed. Radial velocities and atmospheric parameters are derived in order to check their membership in the clusters. Effective temperatures were obtained from photometric data for stars with Teff > 3800 K, whereas for cooler stars, they were derived from equivalent widths of TiO bands. Calibrations of W(TiO) as a function of stellar parameters based on a grid of synthetic spectra are presented. Metallicities were derived from a comparison of the observed spectra to a grid of synthetic spectra. The sample comprises evolutionary stages from the Red Giant Branch to the Horizontal Branch, with parameters in the range 3200 <= Teff <= 5000 K and -0.5 <= log g <= 2.4. The mean metallicities obtained for NGC 6528 and NGC 6553 are [Fe/H] ~ -0.5 and -0.7, in both cases with [Mg/Fe] = +0.3; assuming the same overabundance for the $\alpha$ elements O, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Ti, this gives [Z/Zsolar] = -0.25 and -0.45. Membership verification by means of low resolution spectra is a crucial step in preparing targets for high resolution spectroscopy with 8m class telescopes.