• Stars with convective envelopes display magnetic activity, which decreases over time due to the magnetic braking of the star. This age-dependence of magnetic activity is well-studied for younger stars, but the nature of this dependence for older stars is not well understood. This is mainly because absolute stellar ages for older stars are hard to measure. However, relatively accurate stellar ages have recently come into reach through asteroseismology. In this work we present X-ray luminosities, which are a measure for magnetic activity displayed by the stellar coronae, for 24 stars with well-determined ages older than a gigayear. We find 14 stars with detectable X-ray luminosities and use these to calibrate the age-activity relationship. We find a relationship between stellar X-ray luminosity, normalized by stellar surface area, and age that is steeper than the relationships found for younger stars, with an exponent of $-2.80 \pm 0.72$. Previous studies have found values for the exponent of the age-activity relationship ranging between -1.09 to -1.40, dependent on spectral type, for younger stars. Given that there are recent reports of a flattening relationship between age and rotational period for old cool stars, one possible explanation is that we witness a strong steepening of the relationship between activity and rotation.
  • The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended HI halos and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make VLBI observations
  • The advent of international wideband communication by optical fibre has produced a revolution in communications and the use of the internet. Many African countries are now connected to undersea fibre linking them to other African countries and to other continents. Previously international communication was by microwave links through geostationary satellites. These are becoming redundant in some countries as optical fibre takes over, as this provides 1000 times the bandwidth of the satellite links. In the 1970's and 1980's some two dozen large (30 m diameter class) antennas were built in various African countries to provide the satellite links. Twenty six are currently known in 19 countries. As these antennas become redundant, the possibility exists to convert them for radio astronomy at a cost of roughly one tenth that of a new antenna of similar size. HartRAO, SKA Africa and the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) have started exploring this possibility with some of the African countries.
  • We have carried out sub-mm 12CO(J=3-2) observations of 6 giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the ASTE 10m sub-mm telescope at a spatial resolution of 5 pc and very high sensitivity. We have identified 32 molecular clumps in the GMCs and revealed significant details of the warm and dense molecular gas with n(H2) $\sim$ 10$^{3-5}$ cm$^{-3}$ and Tkin $\sim$ 60 K. These data are combined with 12CO(J=1-0) and 13CO(J=1-0) results and compared with LVG calculations. We found that the ratio of 12CO(J=3-2) to 12CO(J=1-0) emission is sensitive to and is well correlated with the local Halpha flux. We interpret that differences of clump propeties represent an evolutionary sequence of GMCs in terms of density increase leading to star formation.Type I and II GMCs (starless GMCs and GMCs with HII regions only, respectively) are at the young phase of star formation where density does not yet become high enough to show active star formation and Type III GMCs (GMCs with HII regions and young star clusters) represents the later phase where the average density is increased and the GMCs are forming massive stars. The high kinetic temperature correlated with \Halpha flux suggests that FUV heating is dominant in the molecular gas of the LMC.
  • We have searched for emission from the 557 GHz ortho-water line in the interstellar medium of six nearby starburst galaxies. We used the Odin satellite to observe the 1_10-1_01 transition of o-H2O in the galaxies NGC253, IC342, M82, NGC4258, CenA, and M51. None of the galaxies in our sample was detected. We derive three sigma upper limits to the H2O abundance relative to H2 ranging from 2e-9 to 1e-8. The best of these upper limits are comparable to the measured abundance of H$_2$O in the Galactic star forming region W3. However, if only 10% of the molecular gas is in very dense cores, then the water abundance limits in the cores themselves would be larger by a factor of 10 i.e. 2e-8 to 1e-7. These observations suggest that detections of H2O emission in galaxies with the upcoming Herschel Space Observatory are likely to require on-source integration times of an hour or more except in the very brightest extragalactic targets such as M82 and NGC253.
  • We present a 39 h integration with the Odin satellite on the ground-state 118.75 GHz line of O2 towards the region of strongest molecular emission in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Our 3sigma upper limit to the O2 integrated intensity of <0.049 K km/s in a 9'(160 pc) diameter beam corresponds to an upper limit on the O2/H2 abundance ratio of <1.3E-6. Although a factor of 20 above the best limit on the O2 abundance obtained for a Galactic source, our result has interesting implications for understanding oxygen chemistry at sub-solar metal abundances. We compare our abundance limit to a variety of astrochemical models and find that, at low metallicities, the low O2 abundance is most likely produced by the effects of photo-dissociation on molecular cloud structure. Freeze-out of molecules onto dust grains may also be consistent with the observed abundance limit, although such models have not yet been run at sub-solar initial metallicities.
  • We summarize the present status of VLBI experiments at 3 mm (86 GHz), 2 mm (129-150 GHz) and 1.3 mm (215-230 GHz). We present and discuss a new 3 mm VLBI map of M87 (Virgo A), which has a spatial resolution of only approx. 20 Schwarzschild radii. We discuss recent VLBI results for SgrA* and argue in favor of new observations within an extended European mm-VLBI network, in order to search for variability. We discuss the possibilities to image the `event horizon' of a super-massive black hole at wavelengths < 2mm, and conclude that the addition of large and sensitive millimetre telescopes such as CARMA, the SMA, the LMT and ALMA will be crucial for this.
  • We present the first VLBI maps of H2O maser emission (lambda 1.3cm) in the nucleus of the Circinus Galaxy, constructed from data obtained with the Australia Telescope Long Baseline Array. The maser emission traces a warped, edge-on accretion disk between radii of 0.11+/-0.02 and ~0.40 pc, as well as a wide-angle outflow that extends up to ~1 pc from the estimated disk center. The disk rotation is close to Keplerian (v varies as 1/sqrt(r)), the maximum detected rotation speed is 260 km/s, and the inferred central mass is 1.7+/-0.3 x 10^6 solar masses. The outflowing masers are irregularly distributed above and below the disk, with relative outflow velocities up to ~+/-160 km/s, projected along the line of sight. The flow probably originates closer than 0.1 pc to the central engine, possibly in an inward extension of the accretion disk, though there is only weak evidence of rotation in the outward moving material. We observe that the warp of the disk appears to collimate the outflow and to fix the extent of the ionization cone observed on larger angular scales. This study provides the first direct evidence (i.e., through imaging) of dusty, high-density, molecular material in a nuclear outflow <1 pc from the central engine of a Seyfert galaxy, as well as the first graphic evidence that warped accretion disks can channel outflows and illumination patterns in AGN. We speculate that the same arrangement, which in some ways obviates the need for a geometrically thick, dusty torus, may apply to other type-2 AGN.
  • The first VLBI images of water maser emission in the Circinus Galaxy AGN show both a warped, edge-on accretion disk and an outflow 0.1 to 1 pc from the central engine. The inferred central mass is 1.3 million suns, while the disk mass may be on the order of 0.1 million suns, based on a nearly Keplerian rotation curve. The bipolar, wide-angle outflow appears to contain ``bullets'' ejected from within <0.1 pc of the central mass. The positions of filaments and bullets observed in the AGN ionization cone on kpc-scales suggest that the disk channels the flow to a radius of about 0.4 pc, at which the flow appears to disrupt the disk.