• We report the discovery and initial follow-up of a double neutron star (DNS) system, PSR J1946$+$2052, with the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array pulsar (PALFA) survey. PSR J1946$+$2052 is a 17-ms pulsar in a 1.88-hour, eccentric ($e \, =\, 0.06$) orbit with a $\gtrsim 1.2 \, M_\odot$ companion. We have used the Jansky Very Large Array to localize PSR J1946$+$2052 to a precision of 0.09 arcseconds using a new phase binning mode. We have searched multiwavelength catalogs for coincident sources but did not find any counterparts. The improved position enabled a measurement of the spin period derivative of the pulsar ($\dot{P} \, = \, 9\,\pm \, 2 \,\times 10^{-19}$); the small inferred magnetic field strength at the surface ($B_S \, = \, 4 \, \times \, 10^9 \, \rm G$) indicates that this pulsar has been recycled. This and the orbital eccentricity lead to the conclusion that PSR J1946$+$2052 is in a DNS system. Among all known radio pulsars in DNS systems, PSR J1946$+$2052 has the shortest orbital period and the shortest estimated merger timescale, 46 Myr; at that time it will display the largest spin effects on gravitational wave waveforms of any such system discovered to date. We have measured the advance of periastron passage for this system, $\dot{\omega} \, = \, 25.6 \, \pm \, 0.3\, \deg \rm yr^{-1}$, implying a total system mass of only 2.50 $\pm$ 0.04 $M_\odot$, so it is among the lowest mass DNS systems. This total mass measurement combined with the minimum companion mass constrains the pulsar mass to $\lesssim 1.3 \, M_\odot$.
  • Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration, extragalactic radio flashes of unknown physical origin. FRB 121102, the only known repeating FRB source, has been localized to a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at redshift z = 0.193, and is spatially coincident with a compact, persistent radio source. The origin of the bursts, the nature of the persistent source, and the properties of the local environment are still debated. Here we present bursts that show ~100% linearly polarized emission at a very high and variable Faraday rotation measure in the source frame: RM_src = +1.46 x 10^5 rad m^-2 and +1.33 x 10^5 rad m^-2 at epochs separated by 7 months, in addition to narrow (< 30 mus) temporal structure. The large and variable rotation measure demonstrates that FRB 121102 is in an extreme and dynamic magneto-ionic environment, while the short burst durations argue for a neutron star origin. Such large rotation measures have, until now, only been observed in the vicinities of massive black holes (M_BH > 10^4 MSun). Indeed, the properties of the persistent radio source are compatible with those of a low-luminosity, accreting massive black hole. The bursts may thus come from a neutron star in such an environment. However, the observed properties may also be explainable in other models, such as a highly magnetized wind nebula or supernova remnant surrounding a young neutron star.
  • We undertook coordinated campaigns with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Arecibo radio telescopes during Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton observations of the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 to search for simultaneous radio and X-ray bursts. We find 12 radio bursts from FRB 121102 during 70 ks total of X-ray observations. We detect no X-ray photons at the times of radio bursts from FRB 121102 and further detect no X-ray bursts above the measured background at any time. We place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit of $3\times10^{-11}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ on the 0.5--10 keV fluence for X-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts for durations $<700$ ms, which corresponds to a burst energy of $4\times10^{45}$ erg at the measured distance of FRB 121102. We also place limits on the 0.5--10 keV fluence of $5\times10^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ and $1\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ for bursts emitted at any time during the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, respectively, assuming a typical X-ray burst duration of 5 ms. We analyze data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 10--100 keV fluence of $4\times10^{-9}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ ($5\times10^{47}$ erg at the distance of FRB 121102) for gamma-ray bursts at the time of radio bursts. We also present a deep search for a persistent X-ray source using all of the X-ray observations taken to date and place a 5$\sigma$ upper limit on the 0.5--10 keV flux of $4\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ ($3\times10^{41}$ erg~s$^{-1}$ at the distance of FRB 121102). We discuss these non-detections in the context of the host environment of FRB 121102 and of possible sources of fast radio bursts in general.
  • Plasma lenses in the host galaxies of fast radio bursts (FRBs) can strongly modulate FRB amplitudes for a wide range of distances, including the $\sim $ Gpc distance of the repeater FRB121102. To produce caustics, the lens' dispersion-measure depth (${\rm DM}_{\ell}$), scale size ($a$), and distance from the source ($d_{\rm sl}$) must satisfy ${\rm DM}_{\ell} d_{\rm sl} / a^2 \gtrsim 0.65~ {\rm pc^2 \ AU^{-2} \ cm^{-3}}$. Caustics produce strong magnifications ($\lesssim 10^2$) on short time scales ($\sim$ hours to days and perhaps shorter) along with narrow, epoch dependent spectral peaks (0.1 to 1~GHz). However, strong suppression also occurs in long-duration ($\sim$ months) troughs. For geometries that produce multiple images, the resulting burst components will arrive differentially by $< 1~\mu$s to tens of ms and they will show different apparent dispersion measures, $\delta{\rm DM}_{\rm apparent} \sim 1$ pc cm$^{-3}$. Arrival time perturbations may mask any underlying periodicity with period $\lesssim 1$ s. When arrival times differ by less than the burst width, interference effects in dynamic spectra are expected. Strong lensing requires source sizes smaller than $({\rm Fresnel~scale)^2} / a$, which can be satisfied by compact objects such as neutron star magnetospheres but not by AGNs. Much of the phenomenology of the repeating fast radio burst source FRB121102 is similar to lensing effects. The overall picture can be tested by obtaining wideband spectra of bursts (from $<1$ to 10 GHz and possibly higher), which can also be used to characterize the plasma environment near FRB sources. A rich variety of phenomena is expected from an ensemble of lenses near the FRB source. We discuss constraints on densities, magnetic fields, and locations of plasma lenses related to requirements for lensing to occur.
  • Fast radio bursts are astronomical radio flashes of unknown physical nature with durations of milliseconds. Their dispersive arrival times suggest an extragalactic origin and imply radio luminosities orders of magnitude larger than any other kind of known short-duration radio transient. Thus far, all FRBs have been detected with large single-dish telescopes with arcminute localizations, and attempts to identify their counterparts (source or host galaxy) have relied on contemporaneous variability of field sources or the presence of peculiar field stars or galaxies. These attempts have not resulted in an unambiguous association with a host or multi-wavelength counterpart. Here we report the sub-arcsecond localization of FRB 121102, the only known repeating burst source, using high-time-resolution radio interferometric observations that directly image the bursts themselves. Our precise localization reveals that FRB 121102 originates within 100 mas of a faint 180 uJy persistent radio source with a continuum spectrum that is consistent with non-thermal emission, and a faint (25th magnitude) optical counterpart. The flux density of the persistent radio source varies by tens of percent on day timescales, and very long baseline radio interferometry yields an angular size less than 1.7 mas. Our observations are inconsistent with the fast radio burst having a Galactic origin or its source being located within a prominent star-forming galaxy. Instead, the source appears to be co-located with a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus or a previously unknown type of extragalactic source. [Truncated] If other fast radio bursts have similarly faint radio and optical counterparts, our findings imply that direct sub-arcsecond localizations of FRBs may be the only way to provide reliable associations.
  • We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5-0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi gamma-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199-day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 solar masses. Several of the sources exhibit timing noise, and two, PSRs J0611+1436 and J1907+0631, have both suffered large glitches, but with very different post-glitch rotation properties. In particular, the rotational period of PSR J0611+1436 will not recover to its pre-glitch value for about 12 years, a far greater recovery timescale than seen following any other large glitches.
  • We report the discovery of two long-term intermittent radio pulsars in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, extended observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have revealed the details of their rotation and radiation properties. PSRs J1910+0517 and J1929+1357 show long-term extreme bi-modal intermittency, switching between active (ON) and inactive (OFF) emission states and indicating the presence of a large, hitherto unrecognised, underlying population of such objects. For PSR J1929+1357, the initial duty cycle was fON=0.008, but two years later this changed, quite abruptly, to fON=0.16. This is the first time that a significant evolution in the activity of an intermittent pulsar has been seen and we show that the spin-down rate of the pulsar is proportional to the activity. The spin-down rate of PSR J1929+1357 is increased by a factor of 1.8 when it is in active mode, similar to the increase seen in the other three known long-term intermittent pulsars.
  • We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value ($\sim559$ pc cm$^{-3}$) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic value. The 2-GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2-GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5$\sigma$ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined with archival WISE 22-$\mu$m and IPHAS H$\alpha$ surveys, rules out the presence of an intervening Galactic HII region. We update our estimate of the FRB detection rate in the PALFA survey to be 1.1$^{+3.7}_{-1.0} \times 10^4$ FRBs sky$^{-1}$ day$^{-1}$ (95% confidence) for peak flux density at 1.4 GHz above 300 mJy. We find that the intrinsic widths of the 12 FRB 121102 bursts from Arecibo are, on average, significantly longer than the intrinsic widths of the 13 single-component FRBs detected with the Parkes telescope.
  • We analyze plasma dispersion and scattering of fast radio bursts (FRBs) to identify the dominant locations of free electrons along their lines of sight and thus constrain the distances of the burst sources themselves. We establish the average $\tau$-DM relation for Galactic pulsars and use it as a benchmark for discussing FRB scattering. Though scattering times $\tau$ for FRBs are large in the majority of the 17 events we analyze, they are systematically smaller than those of Galactic pulsars that have similar dispersion measures (DMs). The lack of any correlation between $\tau$ and DM for FRBs suggests that the intergalactic medium (IGM) cannot account for both $\tau$ and DM. We therefore consider mixed models involving the IGM and host galaxies. If the IGM contributes significantly to DM while host galaxies dominate $\tau$, the scattering deficit with respect to the mean Galactic trend can be explained with a $\tau$-DM relation in the host that matches that for the Milky Way. However, it is possible that hosts dominate both $\tau$ and DM, in which case the observed scattering deficits require free electrons in the host to be less turbulent than in the Galaxy, such as if they are in hot rather than warm ionized regions. Our results imply that distances or redshifts of FRB sources can be significantly overestimated if they are based on the assumption that the extragalactic portion of DM is dominated by the IGM.
  • We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 ($P=4.3$ ms) in a binary system with an eccentric ($e=0.08$) 22-day orbit in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 $M_\odot$ and is most likely a white dwarf. Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities $e < 0.001$. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with $0.027 < e < 0.44$; PSR J1950+2414 is the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for its intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities are incompatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their evolution. Proposed scenarios are a) initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar white dwarf, and d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. Future measurements of the masses and proper motion might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.
  • Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4-GHz Pulsar ALFA survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 $\pm$ 3 pc cm$^{-3}$, pulse width of $3\; \pm 0.5$ ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude ($b = -0.2^{\circ}$), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line-of-sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.
  • The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic Center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15 arcmin of Sgr A*, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, non-detections in high frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc and estimates of the core-collapse supernova rate based on X-ray measurements. We find that under current observational constraints, the inner parsec of the Galaxy could harbor as many as ~10^3 active radio pulsars that are beamed towards Earth. Such a large population would distort the low-frequency measurements of both the intrinsic spectrum of Sgr A* and the free-free absorption along the line of sight of Sgr A*.