• We report our observation of the short GRB 170817A, associated to the binary neutron star merger event GW 170817, perfomed in the X-ray band with XMM-Newton 135 d after the event (on the 29th December 2017). We find evidence for a flattening of the X-ray light curve with respect to the previously observed brightening. This is also supported by a nearly simultaneous optical Hubble Space Telescope and successive X-ray Chandra and low-frequency radio observations recently reported in the literature. Since the optical-to-X-ray spectral slope did not change with respect to previous observations, we exclude that the change in the temporal evolution of the light curve is due to the passage of the cooling frequency: its origin must be geometric or dynamical. We interpret all the existing afterglow data with two models: i) a structured jet and ii) a jet-less isotropic fireball with some stratification in its radial velocity structure. Both models fit the data and predict that the radio flux must decrease simultaneously with the optical and the X-ray one, making hard to distinguish between them at the present stage. Polarimetric measures and the rate of short GRB-GW association in future LIGO/Virgo runs will be key to disentangle these two geometrically different scenarios.
  • The role played by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the X-ray absorption towards high-redshift sources has recently drawn more attention in spectral analysis studies. Here, we study the X-ray absorption towards 15 flat-spectrum radio quasars at $z>2$, relying on high counting statistic ($\gtrsim10\,000$ photons) provided by XMM-Newton, with additional NuSTAR (and simultaneous Swift-XRT) observations when available. Blazars can be confidently considered to have negligible X-ray absorption along the line of sight within the host galaxy, likely swept by the kpc-scale relativistic jet. This makes our sources ideal for testing the absorption component along the IGM. Our new approach is to revisit the origin of the soft X-ray spectral hardening observed in high-z blazars in terms of X-ray absorption occurring along the IGM, with the help of a low-z sample used as comparison. We verify that the presence of absorption in excess of the Galactic value is the preferred explanation to explain the observed hardening, while intrinsic energy breaks, predicted by blazars' emission models, can easily occur out of the observing energy band in most sources. First, we perform an indirect analysis comparing the inferred amount of absorption in excess of the Galactic value with a simulated IGM absorption contribution, that increases with redshift and includes both a minimum component from diffuse IGM metals, and the additional contribution of discrete denser intervening regions. Then, we directly investigate the warm-hot IGM with a spectral model on the best candidates of our sample, obtaining an average IGM density of $n_0=1.01^{+0.53}_{-0.72}\times10^{-7}$ cm$^{-3}$ and temperature of $\log(T/\text{K})=6.45^{+0.51}_{-2.12}$. A more dedicated study is currently beyond reach, but our results can be used as a stepping stone for future more accurate analysis, involving Athena.
  • The recent discovery of the electromagnetic counterpart of the gravitational wave source GW170817, has demonstrated the huge informative power of multi-messenger observations. During the next decade the nascent field of multi-messenger astronomy will mature significantly. Around 2030, third generation gravitational wave detectors will be roughly ten times more sensitive than the current ones. At the same time, neutrino detectors currently upgrading to multi km^3 telescopes, will include a 10 km^3 facility in the Southern hemisphere that is expected to be operational around 2030. In this review, we describe the most promising high frequency gravitational wave and neutrino sources that will be detected in the next two decades. In this context, we show the important role of the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS), a mission concept proposed to ESA by a large international collaboration in response to the call for the Cosmic Vision Programme M5 missions. THESEUS aims at providing a substantial advancement in early Universe science as well as playing a fundamental role in multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics, operating in strong synergy with future gravitational wave and neutrino detectors as well as major ground- and space-based telescopes. This review is an extension of the THESEUS white paper (Amati et al. 2017), also in light of the discovery of GW170817/GRB170817A that was announced on October 16th, 2017.
  • L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • Knowledge of the bulk Lorentz factor $\Gamma_{0}$ of GRBs allows us to compute their comoving frame properties shedding light on their physics. Upon collisions with the circumburst matter, the fireball of a GRB starts to decelerate, producing a peak or a break (depending on the circumburst density profile) in the light curve of the afterglow. Considering all bursts with known redshift and with an early coverage of their emission, we find 67 GRBs with a peak in their optical or GeV light curves at a time $t_{\rm p}$. For another 106 GRBs we set an upper limit $t_{\rm p}^{\rm UL}$. We show that $t_{\rm p}$ is due to the dynamics of the fireball deceleration and not to the passage of a characteristic frequency of the synchrotron spectrum across the optical band. Considering the $t_{\rm p}$ of 66 long GRBs and the 85 most constraining upper limits, using censored data analysis methods, we reconstruct the most likely distribution of $t_{\rm p}$. All $t_{\rm p}$ are larger than the time $t_{\rm p,g}$ when the prompt emission peaks, and are much larger than the time $t_{\rm ph}$ when the fireball becomes transparent. The reconstructed distribution of $\Gamma_0$ has median value $\sim$300 (150) for a uniform (wind) circumburst density profile. In the comoving frame, long GRBs have typical isotropic energy, luminosity, and peak energy $\langle E_{\rm iso}\rangle=3(8)\times 10^{50}$ erg, $\langle L_{\rm iso}\rangle=3(15) \times 10^{47}$ erg s$^{-1}$ , and $\langle E_{\rm peak}\rangle =1(2)$ keV in the homogeneous (wind) case. We confirm that the significant correlations between $\Gamma$ and the rest frame isotropic energy ($E_{\rm iso}$), luminosity ($L_{\rm iso}$) and peak energy ($E_{\rm peak}$) are not due to selection effects. Assuming a typical opening angle of 5 degrees, we derive the distribution of the jet baryon loading which is centered around a few $10^{-6} {\rm M_{\odot}}$.
  • We performed a search for eclipsing and dipping sources in the archive of the EXTraS project - a systematic characterization of the temporal behaviour of XMM-Newton point sources. We discovered dips in the X-ray light curve of 3XMM J004232.1+411314, which has been recently associated with the hard X-ray source dominating the emission of M31. A systematic analysis of XMM-Newton observations revealed 13 dips in 40 observations (total exposure time $\sim$0.8 Ms). Among them, four observations show two dips, separated by $\sim$4.01 hr. Dip depths and durations are variable. The dips occur only during low-luminosity states (L$_{0.2-12}<1\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$), while the source reaches L$_{0.2-12}\sim2.8\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We propose this system to be a new dipping Low-Mass X-ray Binary in M31 seen at high inclination (60$^{\circ}$-80$^{\circ}$), the observed dipping periodicity is the orbital period of the system. A blue HST source within the Chandra error circle is the most likely optical counterpart of the accretion disk. The high luminosity of the system makes it the most luminous dipper known to date.
  • The merger of two dense stellar remnants including at least one neutron star (NS) is predicted to produce gravitational waves (GWs) and short duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs). In the process, neutron-rich material is ejected from the system and heavy elements are synthesized by r-process nucleosynthesis. The radioactive decay of these heavy elements produces additional transient radiation termed "kilonova" or "macronova". We report the detection of linear optical polarization P = (0.50 +/- 0.07)% at 1.46 days after detection of the GWs from GW170817, a double neutron star merger associated with an optical macronova counterpart and a short GRB. The optical emission from a macronova is expected to be characterized by a blue, rapidly decaying, component and a red, more slowly evolving, component due to material rich of heavy elements, the lanthanides. The polarization measurement was made when the macronova was still in its blue phase, during which there is an important contribution from a lanthanide-free outflow. The low degree of polarization is consistent with intrinsically unpolarized emission scattered by Galactic dust, suggesting a symmetric geometry of the emitting region and low inclination of the merger system. Stringent upper limits to the polarization degree from 2.45 - 9.48 days post-burst are consistent with the lanthanides-rich macronova interpretation.
  • The merger of two neutron stars is predicted to give rise to three major detectable phenomena: a short burst of gamma-rays, a gravitational wave signal, and a transient optical/near-infrared source powered by the synthesis of large amounts of very heavy elements via rapid neutron capture (the r-process). Such transients, named "macronovae" or "kilonovae", are believed to be centres of production of rare elements such as gold and platinum. The most compelling evidence so far for a kilonova was a very faint near-infrared rebrightening in the afterglow of a short gamma-ray burst at z = 0.356, although findings indicating bluer events have been reported. Here we report the spectral identification and describe the physical properties of a bright kilonova associated with the gravitational wave source GW 170817 and gamma-ray burst GRB 170817A associated with a galaxy at a distance of 40 Mpc from Earth. Using a series of spectra from ground-based observatories covering the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared, we find that the kilonova is characterized by rapidly expanding ejecta with spectral features similar to those predicted by current models. The ejecta is optically thick early on, with a velocity of about 0.2 times light speed, and reaches a radius of about 50 astronomical units in only 1.5 days. As the ejecta expands, broad absorption-like lines appear on the spectral continuum indicating atomic species produced by nucleosynthesis that occurs in the post-merger fast-moving dynamical ejecta and in two slower (0.05 times light speed) wind regions. Comparison with spectral models suggests that the merger ejected 0.03-0.05 solar masses of material, including high-opacity lanthanides.
  • We report the results of deep optical follow-up surveys of the first two gravitational-wave sources, GW150914 and GW151226, done by the GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm Collaboration (GRAWITA). The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) responded promptly to the gravitational-wave alerts sent by the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations, monitoring a region of $90$ deg$^2$ and $72$ deg$^2$ for GW150914 and GW151226, respectively, and repeated the observations over nearly two months. Both surveys reached an average limiting magnitude of about 21 in the $r-$band. The paper describes the VST observational strategy and two independent procedures developed to search for transient counterpart candidates in multi-epoch VST images. Several transients have been discovered but no candidates are recognized to be related to the gravitational-wave events. Interestingly, among many contaminant supernovae, we find a possible correlation between the supernova VSTJ57.77559-59.13990 and GRB150827A detected by {\it Fermi}-GBM. The detection efficiency of VST observations for different types of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave events are evaluated for the present and future follow-up surveys.
  • We present a comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the long Swift GRB 120327A afterglow data to investigate the possible causes of the observed early time colour variations. We collected data from various instruments/telescopes in different bands (X-rays, ultra- violet, optical and near-infrared) and determined the shapes of the afterglow early-time light curves. We studied the overall temporal behaviour and the spectral energy distributions from early to late times. The ultra-violet, optical, and near-infrared light curves can be modelled with a single power-law component between 200 and 2e4 s after the burst event. The X-ray light curve shows a canonical steep-shallow-steep behaviour, typical of long gamma-ray bursts. At early times a colour variation is observed in the ultra-violet/optical bands, while at very late times a hint of a re-brightening is visible. The observed early time colour change can be explained as a variation in the intrinsic optical spectral index, rather than an evolution of the optical extinction.
  • We report on the X-ray dust-scattering features observed around the afterglow of the gamma ray burst GRB 160623A. With an XMM-Newton observation carried out ~2 days after the burst, we found evidence of at least six rings, with angular size expanding between ~2 and 9 arcmin, as expected for X-ray scattering of the prompt GRB emission by dust clouds in our Galaxy. From the expansion rate of the rings, we measured the distances of the dust layers with extraordinary precision: 528.1 +\- 1.2 pc, 679.2 +\- 1.9 pc, 789.0 +\- 2.8 pc, 952 +\- 5 pc, 1539 +\- 20 pc and 5079 +\- 64 pc. A spectral analysis of the ring spectra, based on an appropriate dust-scattering model (BARE-GR-B from Zubko et al. 2004}) and the estimated burst fluence, allowed us to derive the column density of the individual dust layers, which are in the range 7x10^20-1.5x10^22 cm^-2. The farthest dust-layer (i.e. the one responsible for the smallest ring) is also the one with the lowest column density and it is possibly very extended, indicating a diffuse dust region. The properties derived for the six dust-layers (distance, thickness, and optical depth) are generally in good agreement with independent information on the reddening along this line of sight and on the distribution of molecular and atomic gas.
  • We use numerical N-body hydrodynamical simulations with varying PopIII stellar models to investigate the possibility of detecting first star signatures with observations of high-redshift damped Ly$\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs). The simulations include atomic and molecular cooling, star formation, energy feedback and metal spreading due to the evolution of stars with a range of masses and metallicities. Different initial mass functions (IMFs) and corresponding metal-dependent yields and lifetimes are adopted to model primordial stellar populations. The DLAs in the simulations are selected according to either the local gas temperature (temperature selected) or the host mass (mass selected). We find that 3\% (40\%) of mass (temperature) selected high-$z$ ($z\ge5.5$) DLAs retain signatures of pollution from PopIII stars, independently from the first star model. Such DLAs have low halo mass ($<10^{9.6}\,\rm M_{\odot}$), metallicity ($<10^{-3}\,\rm Z_{\odot}$) and star formation rate ($<10^{-1.5}\,\rm M_{\odot}\,yr^{-1}$). { Metal abundance ratios of DLAs imprinted in the spectra of QSO} can be useful tools to infer the properties of the polluting stellar generation and to constrain the first star mass ranges. Comparing the abundance ratios derived from our simulations to those observed in DLAs at $z\ge5$, we find that most of these DLAs are consistent within errors with PopII stars dominated enrichment and strongly disfavor the pollution pattern of very massive first stars (i.e. 100~$\rm M_{\odot}$-500~$\rm M_{\odot}$). However, some of them could still result from the pollution of first stars in the mass range [0.1, 100]~$\rm M_{\odot}$. In particular, we find that the abundance ratios from SDSS J1202+3235 are consistent with those expected from PopIII enrichment dominated by massive (but not extreme) first stars.
  • Ultraluminous x-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies shine brighter than any X-ray source in our Galaxy. ULXs are usually modeled as stellar-mass black holes (BHs) accreting at very high rates or intermediate-mass BHs. We present observations showing that NGC5907 ULX is instead an x-ray accreting neutron star (NS) with a spin period evolving from 1.43~s in 2003 to 1.13~s in 2014. It has an isotropic peak luminosity of about 1000 times the Eddington limit for a NS at 17.1~Mpc. Standard accretion models fail to explain its luminosity, even assuming beamed emission, but a strong multipolar magnetic field can describe its properties. These findings suggest that other extreme ULXs (x-ray luminosity > 10^{41} erg/s) might harbor NSs.
  • We investigate the existence of a metallicity threshold for the production of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). We used the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 sample of LGRBs. We considered the stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity determined from the host galaxy photometry and spectroscopy up to z = 2 and used them to compare the distribution of host galaxies to that of field galaxies in the mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relation plane. We find that although LGRBs also form in galaxies with relatively large stellar masses, the large majority of host galaxies have metallicities below log(O=H)~8.6. The extension to z = 2 results in a good sampling of stellar masses also above Log(Mstar/Msun)~9.5 and provides evidence that LGRB host galaxies do not follow the fundamental metallicity relation. As shown by the comparison with dedicated numerical simulations of LGRB host galaxy population, these results are naturally explained by the existence of a mild (~0.7 Zsun) threshold for the LGRB formation. The present statistics does not allow us to discriminate between different shapes of the metallicity cutoff, but the relatively high metallicity threshold found in this work is somewhat in disagreement to most of the standard single-star models for LGRB progenitors.
  • NGC 7793 P13 is a variable (luminosity range ~100) ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) proposed to host a stellar-mass black hole of less than 15 M$_{\odot}$ in a binary system with orbital period of 64 d and a 18-23 M$_{\odot}$ B9Ia companion. Within the EXTraS project we discovered pulsations at a period of ~0.42 s in two XMM-Newton observations of NGC 7793 P13, during which the source was detected at $L_{\mathrm{X}}\sim2.1\times10^{39}$ and $5\times10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (0.3-10 keV band). These findings unambiguously demonstrate that the compact object in NGC 7793 P13 is a neutron star accreting at super-Eddington rates. While standard accretion models face difficulties accounting for the pulsar X-ray luminosity, the presence of a multipolar magnetic field with $B$ ~ few $\times$ 10$^{13}$ G close to the base of the accretion column appears to be in agreement with the properties of the system.
  • We present a multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A. This is the 999th GRB detected by the Swift satellite and it has a densely sampled emission in the X-ray and optical band and has been observed and detected in the radio up to 140 days after the prompt. The multiwavelength light curve from 500 s to 140 days can be modelled through a standard forward shock afterglow but requires an additional component to reproduce the early X-ray and optical emission. We present TNG and LBT optical observations performed 19.6, 33.9 and 92.3 days after the trigger which show a bump with respect to a standard afterglow flux decay and are possibly interpreted as due to the underlying SN and host galaxy (of 0.4 uJy in the R band). Radio observations, performed with SRT, Medicina, EVN and VLBA between day 4 and 140, suggest that the burst exploded in an environment characterised by a density profile scaling with the distance from the source (wind profile). A remarkable feature of the prompt emission is the presence of a bright flare 100 s after the trigger, lasting 70 seconds in the soft X-ray band, which was simultaneously detected from the optical band up to the MeV energy range. By combining Swift-BAT/XRT and Fermi-GBM data, the broadband (0.3-1000 keV) time resolved spectral analysis of the flare reveals the coexistence of a non-thermal (power law) and thermal blackbody components. The BB component contributes up to 35% of the luminosity in the 0.3-1000 keV band. The gamma-ray emission observed in Swift-BAT and Fermi-GBM anticipates and lasts less than the soft X-ray emission as observed by Swift-XRT, arguing against a Comptonization origin. The BB component could either be produced by an outflow becoming transparent or by the collision of a fast shell with a slow, heavy and optically thick fireball ejected during the quiescent time interval between the initial and later flares of the burst.
  • We study the possibility to detect and distinguish signatures of enrichment from PopIII stars in observations of PopII GRBs (GRBIIs) at high redshift by using numerical N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including atomic and molecular cooling, star formation and metal spreading from stellar populations with different initial mass functions (IMFs), yields and lifetimes. PopIII and PopII star formation regimes are followed simultaneously and both a top-heavy and a Salpeter-like IMF for pristine PopIII star formation are adopted. We find that the fraction of GRBIIs hosted in a medium previously enriched by PopIII stars (PopIII-dominated) is model independent. Typical abundance ratios, such as [Si/O] vs [C/O] and [Fe/C] vs [Si/C], can help to disentangle enrichment from massive and intermediate PopIII stars, while low-mass first stars are degenerate with regular PopII generations. The properties of galaxies hosting PopIII-dominated GRBIIs are not very sensitive to the particular assumption on the mass of the first stars.
  • The EXTraS project to explore the X-ray Transient and variable Sky searches for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton. XMM-Newton performed more than 400 pointed observations in the region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We inspected the results of the EXTraS period search to systematically look for new X-ray pulsators in our neighbour galaxy. We analysed the XMM-Newton observations of two sources from the 3XMM catalogue which show significant signals for coherent pulsations. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 was detected as source with hard X-ray spectrum in two XMM-Newton observations, revealing a periodic modulation of the X-ray flux with 956~s. As optical counterpart we identify an early-type star with Halpha emission. The OGLE I-band light curve exhibits a regular pattern with three brightness dips which mark a period of ~1350 d. The X-ray spectrum of 3XMM J051034.6-670353 is dominated by a super-soft blackbody-like emission component (kT ~ 70 eV) which is modulated by nearly 100% with a period of ~1418 s. From GROND observations we suggest a star with r' = 20.9 mag as possible counterpart of the X-ray source. 3XMM J051259.8-682640 is confirmed as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discuss the long-term optical period as likely orbital period which would be the longest known from a high-mass X-ray binary. The spectral and temporal properties of the super-soft source 3XMM J051034.6-670353 are very similar to those of RX J0806.3+1527 and RX J1914.4+2456 suggesting that it belongs to the class of double-degenerate polars and is located in our Galaxy rather than in the LMC.
  • We derive the luminosity function and redshift distribution of short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRBs) using (i) all the available observer-frame constraints (i.e. peak flux, fluence, peak energy and duration distributions) of the large population of Fermi SGRBs and (ii) the rest-frame properties of a complete sample of Swift SGRBs. We show that a steep $\phi(L)\propto L^{-a}$ with a>2.0 is excluded if the full set of constraints is considered. We implement a Monte Carlo Markov Chain method to derive the $\phi(L)$ and $\psi(z)$ functions assuming intrinsic Ep-Liso and Ep-Eiso correlations or independent distributions of intrinsic peak energy, luminosity and duration. To make our results independent from assumptions on the progenitor (NS-NS binary mergers or other channels) and from uncertainties on the star formation history, we assume a parametric form for the redshift distribution of SGRBs. We find that a relatively flat luminosity function with slope ~0.5 below a characteristic break luminosity ~3$\times10^{52}$ erg/s and a redshift distribution of SGRBs peaking at z~1.5-2 satisfy all our constraints. These results hold also if no Ep-Liso and Ep-Eiso correlations are assumed. We estimate that, within ~200 Mpc (i.e. the design aLIGO range for the detection of GW produced by NS-NS merger events), 0.007-0.03 SGRBs yr$^{-1}$ should be detectable as gamma-ray events. Assuming current estimates of NS-NS merger rates and that all NS-NS mergers lead to a SGRB event, we derive a conservative estimate of the average opening angle of SGRBs: $\theta_{jet}$~3-6 deg. Our luminosity function implies an average luminosity L~1.5$\times 10^{52}$ erg/s, nearly two orders of magnitude higher than previous findings, which greatly enhances the chance of observing SGRB "orphan" afterglows. Efforts should go in the direction of finding and identifying such orphan afterglows as counterparts of GW events.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are both explosive transients with very massive progenitor stars. Clues about the nature of the progenitors can be found by investigating environments in which such transients occur. While studies of LGRB host galaxies have a long history, dedicated observational campaigns have only recently resulted in a high enough number of photometrically and spectroscopically observed SLSN hosts to allow statistically significant analysis of their properties. In this paper we make a comparison of the host galaxies of hydrogen-poor (H-poor) SLSNe and the Swift/BAT6 sample of LGRBs. In contrast to previous studies we use a complete sample of LGRBs and we address a special attention to the comparison methodology and the selection of SLSN sample whose data have been compiled from the available literature. At intermediate redshifts (0.3 < z < 0.7) the two classes of transients select galaxies whose properties (stellar mass, luminosity, star-formation rate, specific star-formation rate and metallicity) do not differ on average significantly. Moreover, the host galaxies of both classes of objects follow the fundamental metallicity relation and the fundamental plane of metallicity. In contrast to previous studies we show that at intermediate redshifts the emission line equivalent widths of the two populations are essentially the same and that the previous claims regarding the higher fraction of SLSN hosts among the extreme emission line galaxies with respect to LGRBs are mostly due to a larger fraction of strong-line emitters among SLSN hosts at z < 0.3, where samples of LGRB hosts are small and poorly defined.
  • We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence >10^{-7} erg cm^{-2}) and relatively nearby (z=0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of <3.0 sigma. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (N_H) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an excess of Galactic N_H in these four GRBs with respect to the tabulated values.
  • Current models suggest gamma-ray bursts could be used as a way of probing Population III stars - the first stars in the early Universe. In this paper we use numerical simulations to demonstrate that late time radio observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows could provide a means of identifying bursts that originate from Population III stars, if these were highly massive, independently from their redshift. We then present the results from a pilot study using the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 17 GHz, designed to test the hypothesis that there may be Population III gamma-ray bursts amongst the current sample of known events. We observed three candidates plus a control gamma-ray burst, and make no detections with upper limits of 20-40 uJy at 500-1300 days post explosion.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to Z $\sim 8.4-8.5$, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are not inconsistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z < 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevent us from reaching more quantitative conclusions.
  • The detection of the first gravitational wave (GW) transient GW150914 prompted an extensive campaign of follow-up observations at all wavelengths. Although no dedicated XMM-Newton observations have been performed, the satellite passed through the GW150914 error box during normal operations. Here we report the analysis of the data taken during these satellite slews performed two hours and two weeks after the GW event. Our data cover 1.1 square degrees and 4.8 square degrees of the final GW localization region. No credible X-ray counterpart to GW150914 is found down to a sensitivity of 6E-13 erg/cm2/s in the 0.2-2 keV band. Nevertheless, these observations show the great potential of XMM-Newton slew observations for the search of the electromagnetic counterparts of GW events. A series of adjacent slews performed in response to a GW trigger would take <1.5 days to cover most of the typical GW credible region. We discuss this scenario and its prospects for detecting the X-ray counterpart of future GW detections.
  • During a search for coherent signals in the X-ray archival data of XMM-Newton, we discovered a modulation at 1.2 s in 3XMM J004301.4+413017 (3X J0043), a source lying in the direction of an external arm of M 31. This short period indicates a neutron star (NS). Between 2000 and 2013, the position of 3X J0043 was imaged by public XMM-Newton observations 35 times. The analysis of these data allowed us to detect an orbital modulation at 1.27 d and study the long-term properties of the source. The emission of the pulsar was rather hard (most spectra are described by a power law with $\Gamma < 1$) and, assuming the distance to M 31, the 0.3-10 keV luminosity was variable, from $\sim$$3\times10^{37}$ to $2\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The analysis of optical data shows that, while 3X J0043 is likely associated to a globular cluster in M 31, a counterpart with $V\gtrsim22$ outside the cluster cannot be excluded. Considering our findings, there are two main viable scenarios for 3X J0043: a peculiar low-mass X-ray binary, similar to 4U 1822-37 or 4U 1626-67, or an intermediate-mass X-ray binary resembling Her X-1. Regardless of the exact nature of the system, 3X J0043 is the first accreting NS in M 31 in which the spin period has been detected.