• (abridged) In this paper we revisit the problem of inferring the innermost structure of the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster via star counts, to clarify whether it displays a core or a cusp around the central black hole. Through image stacking and improved PSF fitting we push the completeness limit about one magnitude deeper than in previous, comparable work. Contrary to previous work, we analyse the stellar density in well-defined magnitude ranges in order to be able to constrain stellar masses and ages. The RC and brighter giant stars display a core-like surface density profile within a projected radius R<0.3 pc of the central black hole, in agreement with previous studies, but show a cusp-like surface density distribution at larger R. The surface density of the fainter stars can be described well by a single power-law at R<2 pc. The cusp-like profile of the faint stars persists even if we take into account the possible contamination of stars in this brightness range by young pre-main sequence stars. The data are inconsistent with a core-profile for the faint stars.Finally, we show that a 3D Nuker law provides a very good description of the cluster structure. We conclude that the observed stellar density at the Galactic Centre, as it can be inferred with current instruments, is consistent with the existence of a stellar cusp around the Milky Way's central black hole, Sgr A*. This cusp is well developed inside the influence radius of about 3 pc of Sgr A* and can be described by a single three-dimensional power-law with an exponent gamma=1.23+-0.05. The apparent lack of RC stars and brighter giants at projected distances of R < 0.3 pc (R<8") of the massive black hole may indicate that some mechanism has altered their distribution or intrinsic luminosity.
  • This is the second of three papers that search for the predicted stellar cusp around the Milky Way's central black hole, Sagittarius A*, with new data and methods. We aim to infer the distribution of the faintest stellar population currently accessible through observations around Sagittarius A*. We use adaptive optics assisted high angular resolution images obtained with the NACO instrument at the ESO VLT. Through optimised PSF fitting we remove the light from all detected stars above a given magnitude limit. Subsequently we analyse the remaining, diffuse light density. The analysed diffuse light arises from sub-giant and main-sequence stars with KS ~ 19 - 20 with masses of 1 - 2 Msol . These stars can be old enough to be dynamically relaxed. The observed power-law profile and its slope are consistent with the existence of a relaxed stellar cusp around the Milky Way's central black hole. We find that a Nuker law provides an adequate description of the nuclear cluster's intrinsic shape (assuming spherical symmetry). The 3D power-law slope near Sgr A* is \gamma = 1.23 +- 0.05. At a distance of 0.01 pc from the black hole, we estimate a stellar mass density of 2.3 +- 0.3 x 10^7 Msol pc^-3 and a total enclosed stellar mass of 180 +- 20 Msol. These estimates assume a constant mass-to-light ratio and do not take stellar remnants into account. The fact that no cusp is observed for bright (Ks 16) giant stars at projected distances of roughly 0.1-0.3 pc implies that some mechanism has altered their appearance or distribution.
  • We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar envelopes and to determine the star formation rate in the CMZ. We obtained KMOS low-resolution near-infrared spectra (R ~4000) between 2.0 and 2.5 um of sources, many of them previously identified, by mid-infrared photometric criteria, as massive YSOs in the Galactic center. Our final sample consists of 91 stars with good signal-to-noise ratio. We separate YSOs from cool late-type stars based on spectral features of CO and Br_gamma at 2.3 um and 2.16 um respectively. We make use of SED model fits to the observed photometric data points from 1.25 to 24 um in order to estimate approximate masses for the YSOs. Using the spectroscopically identified YSOs in our sample, we confirm that existing colour-colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams are unable to efficiently separate YSOs and cool late-type stars. In addition, we define a new colour-colour criterion that separates YSOs from cool late-type stars in the H-Ks vs H-[8.0] diagram. We use this new criterion to identify YSO candidates in the |l| < 1.5, |b|<0.5 degree region and use model SED fits to estimate their approximate masses. By assuming an appropriate initial mass function (IMF) and extrapolating the stellar IMF down to lower masses, we determine a star formation rate (SFR) of ~0.046 +/- 0.026 Msun/yr assuming an average age of 0.75 +/- 0.25 Myr for the YSOs. This value is lower than estimates found using the YSO counting method in the literature. Our SFR estimate in the CMZ agrees with the previous estimates from different methods and reaffirms that star formation in the CMZ is proceeding at a lower rate than predicted by various star forming models.
  • The Galactic Centre is of fundamental astrophysical interest, but existing near-infrared surveys fall short to cover it adequately. Here we introduce the GALACTICNUCLEUS survey, a JHKs imaging survey of the centre of the Milky Way with a 0.2" angular resolution. We present the observations of Field 1 of our survey, centred approximately on SgrA* with an approximate size of 7.95 ' x 3.43 '. We describe the observational set-up and data reduction pipeline and discuss the quality of the data. Finally, we present some preliminary analysis of the data. The data were acquired with the near-infrared camera HAWK-I at the ESO VLT. Short readout times in combination with the speckle holography algorithm allowed us to produce final images with a stable, Gaussian PSF of 0.2" FWHM. Astrometric calibration is achieved via the VVV survey and photometric calibration is based on the SIRIUS/IRSF survey. The quality of the data is assessed by comparison between observations of the same field with different detectors of HAWK-I and at different times. We reach 5 sigma detection limits of approximately J = 22, H = 21, and Ks = 20. The photometric uncertainties are less than 0.05 at J < 20, H < 17 and Ks < 16. We distinguish five stellar populations in the colour-magnitude diagrams; three of them appear to belong to foreground spiral arms, and the other two correspond to a high- and a low-extinction star groups at the Galactic Centre. We use our data to analyse the near-infrared extinction curve and conclude that it can be described very well by a power-law with an index of JHKs = 2.31 +- 0.03. We do not find any evidence that this index depends on the position along the line-of-sight, or on the absolute value of the extinction. We produce extinction maps that show the clumpiness of the ISM at the Galactic Centre. Finally, we estimate that the majority of the stars have solar or super-solar metallicity.
  • We present 44 and 226 GHz observations of the Galactic center within 20$"$ of Sgr A*. Millimeter continuum emission at 226 GHz is detected from eight stars that have previously been identified at near-IR and radio wavelengths. We also detect a 5.8 mJy source at 226 GHz coincident with the magnetar SGR~J1745-29 located 2.39$"$ SE of Sgr A* and identify a new 2.5$"\times1.5"$ halo of mm emission centered on Sgr A*. The X-ray emission from this halo has been detected previously and is interpreted in terms of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The mm halo surrounds an EW linear feature which appears to arise from Sgr A* and coincides with the diffuse X-ray emission and a minimum in the near-IR extinction. We argue that the millimeter emission is produced by synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons in equipartition with a $\sim 1.5$mG magnetic field. The origin of these is unclear but its coexistence with hot gas supports scenarios in which the gas is produced by the interaction of winds either from the fast moving S-stars, the photo-evaporation of low-mass YSO disks or by a jet-driven outflow from Sgr A*. The spatial anti-correlation of the X-ray, radio and mm emission from the halo and the low near-IR extinction provides compelling evidence for an outflow sweeping up the interstellar material, creating a dust cavity within 2$"$ of Sgr A*. Finally, the radio and mm counterparts to eight near-IR identified stars within $\sim$10\arcs\ of Sgr A* provide accurate astrometry to determine the positional shift between the peak emission at 44 and 226 GHz.
  • Motion of short-period stars orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center has been monitored for more than 20 years. These observations are currently offering a new way to test the gravitational theory in an unexplored regime: in a strong gravitational field, around a supermassive black hole. In this proceeding, we present three results: (i) a constraint on a hypothetical fifth force obtained by using 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars S0-2 and S0-38 ; (ii) an upper limit on the secular advance of the argument of the periastron for the star S0-2 ; (iii) a sensitivity analysis showing that the relativistic redshift of S0-2 will be measured after its closest approach to the black hole in 2018.
  • In this Letter, we demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic Center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic Center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from General Relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of $\left|\alpha\right| < 0.016$ at a length scale of $\lambda=$ 150 astronomical units. We also derive a 95% confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of $\left|\dot \omega_\textrm{S0-2} \right|< 1.6 \times 10^{-3}$ rad/yr, which can be used to constrain various gravitational and astrophysical theories. This analysis provides the first fully self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.
  • We present radio and mm continuum observations of the Galactic center taken with the VLA and ALMA at 44 and 226 GHz, respectively. We detect radio and mm emission from IRS 3, lying ~4.5" NW of Sgr A*, with a spectrum that is consistent with the photospheric emission from an AGB star at the Galactic center. Millimeter images reveal that the envelope of IRS 3, the brightest and most extended 3.8$\mu$m Galactic center stellar source, consists of two semi-circular dust shells facing the direction of Sgr A*. The outer circumstellar shell at the distance of 1.6$\times10^4$ AU, appears to break up into "fingers" of dust directed toward Sgr A*. These features coincide with molecular CS (5-4) emission and a near-IR extinction cloud distributed between IRS 3 and Sgr A*. The NE-SW asymmetric shape of the IRS 3 shells seen at 3.8 micron and radio are interpreted as structures that are tidally distorted by Sgr A*. Using the kinematics of CS emission and the proper motion of IRS 3, the tidally distorted outflowing material from the envelope after 5000 years constrains the distance of IRS 3 to $\sim$0.7 pc in front of or $\sim$0.5 pc behind Sgr A*. This suggests that the mass loss by stars near Sgr A* can supply a reservoir of molecular material near Sgr A*. We also present dark features in radio continuum images coincident with the envelope of IRS 3. These dusty stars provide examples in which high resolution radio continuum images can identify dust enshrouded stellar sources embedded an ionized medium.
  • The existence of stellar cusps in dense clusters around massive black holes is a fundamental, decades-old prediction of theoretical stellar dynamics. Yet, observational evidence has been difficult to obtain. With a new, improved analysis of high-angular resolution images of the central parsecs of the Galactic Center, we are finally able to provide the first solid evidence for the existence of a stellar cusp around the Milky Way's massive black hole. The existence of stellar cusps has a significant impact on predicted event rates of phenomena like tidal disruptions of stars and extreme mass ratio inspirals.
  • Using the VLA, we recently detected a large number of protoplanetary disk (proplyd) candidates lying within a couple of light years of the massive black hole Sgr A*. The bow-shock appearance of proplyd candidates point toward the young massive stars located near Sgr A*. Similar to Orion proplyds, the strong UV radiation from the cluster of massive stars at the Galactic center is expected to photoevaporate and photoionize the circumstellar disks around young, low mass stars, thus allowing detection of the ionized outflows from the photoionized layer surrounding cool and dense gaseous disks. To confirm this picture, ALMA observations detect millimeter emission at 226 GHz from five proplyd candidates that had been detected at 44 and 34 GHz with the VLA. We present the derived disk masses for four sources as a function of the assumed dust temperature. The mass of protoplanetary disks from cool dust emission ranges between 0.03 -- 0.05 solar mass. These estimates are consistent with the disk masses found in star forming sites in the Galaxy. These measurements show the presence of on-going star formation with the implication that gas clouds can survive near Sgr A* and the relative importance of high vs low-mass star formation in the strong tidal and radiation fields of the Galactic center.
  • We construct triaxial dynamical models for the Milky Way nuclear star cluster using Schwarzschild's orbit superposition technique. We fit the stellar kinematic maps presented in Feldmeier et al. (2014). The models are used to constrain the supermassive black hole mass M_BH, dynamical mass-to-light ratio M/L, and the intrinsic shape of the cluster. Our best-fitting model has M_BH = (3.0 +1.1 -1.3)x10^6 M_sun, M/L = (0.90 +0.76 -0.08) M_sun/L_{sun,4.5micron}, and a compression of the cluster along the line-of-sight. Our results are in agreement with the direct measurement of the supermassive black hole mass using the motion of stars on Keplerian orbits. The mass-to-light ratio is consistent with stellar population studies of other galaxies in the mid-infrared. It is possible that we underestimate M_BH and overestimate the cluster's triaxiality due to observational effects. The spatially semi-resolved kinematic data and extinction within the nuclear star cluster bias the observations to the near side of the cluster, and may appear as a compression of the nuclear star cluster along the line-of-sight. We derive a total dynamical mass for the Milky Way nuclear star cluster of M_MWNSC = (2.1 +-0.7)x10^7 M_sun within a sphere with radius r = 2 x r_eff = 8.4 pc. The best-fitting model is tangentially anisotropic in the central r = 0.5-2 pc of the nuclear star cluster, but close to isotropic at larger radii. Our triaxial models are able to recover complex kinematic substructures in the velocity map.
  • We present high spatial resolution mid-infrared images of the nebula around the late-type carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WC)-OB binary system WR~112 taken by the recently upgraded VLT spectrometer and imager for the mid-infrared (VISIR) with the PAH1, NeII\_2, and Q3 filters. The observations reveal a morphology resembling a series of arc-like filaments and broken shells. Dust temperatures and masses are derived for each of the identified filamentary structures, which exhibit temperatures ranging from $179_{-6}^{+8}$ K at the exterior W2 filament to $355_{-25}^{+37}$ K in the central 3". The total dust mass summed over the features is $2.6\pm0.4\times10^{-5}$ $\mathrm{M}_\odot$. A multi-epoch analysis of mid-IR photometry of WR~112 over the past $\sim20$ yr reveals no significant variability in the observed dust temperature and mass. The morphology of the mid-IR dust emission from WR~112 also exhibits no significant expansion from imaging data taken in 2001, 2007, and 2016, which disputes the current interpretation of the nebula as a high expansion velocity ($\sim1200$ km s$^{-1}$) "pinwheel"-shaped outflow driven by the central WC-OB colliding-wind binary. An upper limit of $\lesssim120$ km s$^{-1}$ is derived for the expansion velocity assuming a distance of $4.15$ kpc. The upper limit on the average total mass-loss rate from the central 3" of WR~112 is estimated to be $\lesssim8\times10^{-6}$ $\mathrm{M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We leave its true nature as an open question, but propose that the WR~112 nebula may have formed in the outflow during a previous red or yellow supergiant phase of the central Wolf-Rayet star.
  • Knowing the metallicity distribution of stars in the Galactic Centre has important implications for the formation history of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster. However, this distribution is not well known, and is currently based on a small sample of fewer than 100 stars. We obtained near-infrared K-band spectra of more than 700 late-type stars in the central 4 pc^2 of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster with the integral-field spectrograph KMOS (VLT). We analyse the medium-resolution spectra using a full-spectral fitting method employing the G\"ottingen Spectral library of synthetic PHOENIX spectra. The derived stellar metallicities range from metal-rich [M/H]>+0.3 dex to metal-poor [M/H]<-1.0 dex, with a fraction of 5.2(^{+6.0}+{-3.1}) per cent metal-poor ([M/H]<-0.5 dex) stars. The metal-poor stars are distributed over the entire observed field. The origin of metal-poor stars remains unclear. They could originate from infalling globular clusters. For the metal-rich stellar population ([M/H]>0 dex) a globular cluster origin can be ruled out. As there is only a very low fraction of metal-poor stars in the central 4 pc^2 of the Galactic Centre, we believe that our data can discard a scenario in which the Milky Way nuclear star cluster is purely formed from infalling globular clusters.
  • We present new, more precise measurements of the mass and distance of our Galaxy's central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. These results stem from a new analysis that more than doubles the time baseline for astrometry of faint stars orbiting Sgr A*, combining two decades of speckle imaging and adaptive optics data. Specifically, we improve our analysis of the speckle images by using information about a star's orbit from the deep adaptive optics data (2005 - 2013) to inform the search for the star in the speckle years (1995 - 2005). When this new analysis technique is combined with the first complete re-reduction of Keck Galactic Center speckle images using speckle holography, we are able to track the short-period star S0-38 (K-band magnitude = 17, orbital period = 19 years) through the speckle years. We use the kinematic measurements from speckle holography and adaptive optics to estimate the orbits of S0-38 and S0-2 and thereby improve our constraints of the mass ($M_{bh}$) and distance ($R_o$) of Sgr A*: $M_{bh} = 4.02\pm0.16\pm0.04\times10^6~M_{\odot}$ and $7.86\pm0.14\pm0.04$ kpc. The uncertainties in $M_{bh}$ and $R_o$ as determined by the combined orbital fit of S0-2 and S0-38 are improved by a factor of 2 and 2.5, respectively, compared to an orbital fit of S0-2 alone and a factor of $\sim$2.5 compared to previous results from stellar orbits. This analysis also limits the extended dark mass within 0.01 pc to less than $0.13\times10^{6}~M_{\odot}$ at 99.7% confidence, a factor of 3 lower compared to prior work.
  • Contemporary theory holds that massive stars gather mass during their initial phases via accreting disk-like structures. However, conclusive evidence for disks has remained elusive for the most massive young objects. This is mainly due to significant observational challenges. Incisive studies, even targeting individual objects, are therefore relevant to the progression of the field. NGC 3603 IRS 9A* is a young massive stellar object still surrounded by an envelope of molecular gas. Previous mid-infrared observations with long-baseline interferometry provided evidence for a disk of 50 mas diameter at its core. This work aims at a comprehensive study of the physics and morphology of IRS 9A at near-infrared wavelengths. New sparse aperture masking interferometry data taken with NACO/VLT at Ks and Lp filters were obtained and analysed together with archival CRIRES spectra of the H2 and BrG lines. The calibrated visibilities recorded at Ks and Lp bands suggest the presence of a partially resolved compact object of 30 mas at the core of IRS 9A, together with the presence of over-resolved flux. The spectroastrometric signal of the H2 line shows that this spectral feature proceeds from the large scale extended emission (300 mas) of IRS 9A, while the BrG line appears to be formed at the core of the object (20 mas). This scenario is consistent with the brightness distribution of the source for near- and mid-infrared wavelengths at various spatial scales. However, our model suffers from remaining inconsistencies between SED modelling and the interferometric data. Moreover, the BrG spectroastrometric signal indicates that the core of IRS 9A exhibits some form of complexity such as asymmetries in the disk. Future high-resolution observations are required to confirm the disk/envelope model and to flesh out the details of the physical form of the inner regions of IRS 9A.
  • We present high-resolution multiwavelength radio continuum images of the region within 150$"$ of Sgr A*, revealing a number of new extended features and stellar sources in this region. First, we detect a continuous 2" east-west ridge of radio emission, linking Sgr A* and a cluster of stars associated with IRS 13N and IRS 13E. The ridge suggests that an outflow of east-west blob-like structures is emerging from Sgr A*. We also find arc-like features within the ridge with morphologies suggestive of photoevaporative protoplanetary disks. We use near-IR fluxes to show that the emission has similar characteristics to those of a protoplanetary disk irradiated by the intense radiation field at the Galactic center. This suggests that star formation has taken place within the S cluster 2$"$ from Sgr A*. We suggest that the diffuse X-ray emission associated with Sgr A* is due to an expanding hot wind produced by the mass loss from B-type main sequence stars, and/or the disks of photoevaporation of low mass YSOs at a rate ~10^{-6} solar mass per year. The proposed model naturally reduces the inferred accretion rate and is an alternative to the inflow-outflow style models to explain the underluminous nature of Sgr A*. Second, we detect new cometary radio and nea-IR sources and a striking tower of radio emission suggesting that they are tracing interaction sites of a mildly relativistic jet from Sgr A* with the atmosphere of stars and the nonthermal Sgr A East shell at a PA$\sim50-60^\circ$ with ~10^{-7} solar mass per year, and opening angle 10 degrees.
  • The Galactic centre hosts a crowded, dense nuclear star cluster with a half-light radius of 4 pc. Most of the stars in the Galactic centre are cool late-type stars, but there are also >100 hot early-type stars in the central parsec of the Milky Way. These stars are only 3-8 Myr old. Our knowledge of the number and distribution of early-type stars in the Galactic centre is incomplete. Only a few spectroscopic observations have been made beyond a projected distance of 0.5 pc of the Galactic centre. The distribution and kinematics of early-type stars are essential to understand the formation and growth of the nuclear star cluster. We cover the central >4pc^2 of the Galactic centre using the integral-field spectrograph KMOS. We extracted more than 1,000 spectra from individual stars and identified early-type stars based on their spectra. Our data set contains 114 bright early-type stars: 6 have narrow emission lines, 23 are Wolf-Rayet stars, 9 stars have featureless spectra, and 76 are O/B type stars. Our wide-field spectroscopic data confirm that the distribution of young stars is compact, with 90% of the young stars identified within 0.5 pc of the nucleus. We identify 24 new O/B stars primarily at large radii. We estimate photometric masses of the O/B stars and show that the total mass in the young population is >12,000M_sun. The O/B stars all appear to be bound to the Milky Way nuclear star cluster, while less than 30% belong to the clockwise rotating disk. The central concentration of the early-type stars is a strong argument that they have formed in situ. A large part of the young O/B stars is not on the disk, which either means that the early-type stars did not all form on the same disk or that the disk is dissolving rapidly. [abridged]
  • Recent broad-band 34 and 44 GHz radio continuum observations of the Galactic center have revealed 41 massive stars identified with near-IR counterparts, as well as 44 proplyd candidates within 30" of Sgr A*. Radio observations obtained in 2011 and 2014 have been used to derive proper motions of eight young stars near Sgr A*. The accuracy of proper motion estimates based on near-IR observations by Lu et al. and Paumard et al. have been investigated by using their proper motions to predict the 2014 epoch positions of near-IR stars and comparing the predicted positions with those of radio counterparts in the 2014 radio observations. Predicted positions from Lu et al. show an rms scatter of 6 mas relative to the radio positions, while those from Paumard et al. show rms residuals of 20 mas, which is mainly due to uncertainties in the IR-based proper motions. Under the assumption of homogeneous ionized winds, we also determine the mass-loss rates of 11 radio stars, finding rates that are on average $\sim$2 times smaller than those determined from model atmosphere calculations and near-IR data. Clumpiness of ionized winds would reduce the mass loss rate of WR and O stars by additional factors of 3 and 10, respectively. One important implication of this is a reduction in the expected mass accretion rate onto Sgr A* from stellar winds by nearly an order of magnitude to a value of few$\times10^{-7}$ \msol\ yr$^{-1}$. Finally, we present the positions of 318 compact 34.5 GHz radio sources within 30\arcs\ of Sgr A*. At least 45 of these have stellar counterparts in the near-IR $K_s$ (2.18 $\mu$m) and $L'$ (3.8$\mu$m) bands.
  • We present radio images within 30$''$ of Sgr A* based on recent VLA observations at 34 GHz with 7.8 microJy sensitivity and resolution $\sim88\times46$ milliarcseconds (mas). We report 44 partially resolved compact sources clustered in two regions in the E arm of ionized gas that orbits Sgr A*. These sources have size scales ranging between ~50 and 200 mas (400 to 1600 AUs), and a bow-shock appearance facing the direction of Sgr A*. Unlike the bow-shock sources previously identified in the near-IR but associated with massive stars, these 34 GHz sources do not appear to have near-IR counterparts at 3.8 $\mu$m. We interpret these sources as a candidate population of photoevaporative protoplanetary disks (proplyds) that are associated with newly formed low mass stars with mass loss rates ~10^{-7} - 10^{-6} solar mass per year and are located at the edge of a molecular cloud outlined by ionized gas. The disks are externally illuminated by strong Lyman continuum radiation from the ~100 OB and WR massive stars distributed within 10'' of Sgr A*. The presence of proplyds implies current in-situ star formation activity near Sgr A* and opens a window for the first time to study low mass star, planetary and brown dwarf formations near a supermassive black hole.
  • The super-massive 4 million solar mass black hole Sagittarius~A* (SgrA*) shows flare emission from the millimeter to the X-ray domain. A detailed analysis of the infrared light curves allows us to address the accretion phenomenon in a statistical way. The analysis shows that the near-infrared flare amplitudes are dominated by a single state power law, with the low states in SgrA* limited by confusion through the unresolved stellar background. There are several dusty objects in the immediate vicinity of SgrA*. The source G2/DSO is one of them. Its nature is unclear. It may be comparable to similar stellar dusty sources in the region or may consist predominantly of gas and dust. In this case a particularly enhanced accretion activity onto SgrA* may be expected in the near future. Here the interpretation of recent data and ongoing observations are discussed.
  • This article intends to provide a concise overview, from an observational point-of-view, of the current state of our knowledge of the most relevant properties of the Milky Way's nuclear star cluster (MWNSC). The MWNSC appears to be a typical specimen of nuclear star clusters, which are found at the centers of the majority of all types of galaxies. Nuclear clusters represent the densest and most massive stellar systems in the present-day Universe and frequently coexist with central massive black holes. They are therefore of prime interest for studying stellar dynamics and the MWNSC is the only one that allows us to obtain data on milli-parsec scales. After discussing the main observational constraints, we start with a description of the overall structure and kinematics of the MWNSC, then focus on a comparison to extragalactic systems, summarize the properties of the young, massive stars in the immediate environment of the Milky Way's central black hole, Sagittarius\,A*, and finally focus on the dynamics of stars orbiting the black hole at distances of a few to a few tens of milli parsecs.
  • Context: Massive stars are extremely important for the evolution of the galaxies; there are large gaps in our understanding of their properties and formation, however, mainly because they evolve rapidly, are rare, and distant. It may well be that almost all massive stars are born as triples or higher multiples, but their large distances require very high angular resolution to directly detect the companions at milliarcsecond scales. Aims: Herschel36 is a young massive system located at 1.3 kpc. It has a combined smallest predicted mass of 45 M_sun. Multi-epoch spectroscopic data suggest the existence of at least three gravitationally bound components. Two of them, system Ab, are tightly bound in a spectroscopic binary, and the third one, component Aa, orbits in a wider orbit. Our aim was to image and obtain astrometric and photometric measurements of components Aa and Ab using, for the first time, long-baseline optical interferometry to further constrain its nature. Methods: We observed Herschel 36 with the near-infrared instrument AMBER attached to the ESO VLT Interferometer, which provides an angular resolution of approx. 2 mas. We used the code BSMEM to perform the interferometric image reconstruction. We fitted the interferometric observables using proprietary IDL routines and the code LitPro. Results: We imaged the Aa+Ab components of Herschel 36 in H and K filters. Component Ab is located at a projected distance of 1.81 mas, at a position angle of approx. 222 deg. east of north, the flux ratio between components Aa and Ab is close to one. The small measured angular separation indicates that system Ab and Ab may be approaching the periastron of their orbits. These results, only achievable with long-baseline near-infrared interferometry, constitute the first step toward a thorough understanding of this massive triple system.
  • Within the central 10pc of our Galaxy lies a dense nuclear star cluster (NSC), and similar NSCs are found in most nearby galaxies. Studying the structure and kinematics of NSCs reveals the history of mass accretion of galaxy nuclei. Because the Milky Way (MW) NSC is at a distance of only 8kpc, we can spatially resolve the MWNSC on sub-pc scales. This makes the MWNSC a reference object for understanding the formation of all NSCs. We have used the NIR long-slit spectrograph ISAAC (VLT) in a drift-scan to construct an integral-field spectroscopic map of the central 9.5 x 8pc of our Galaxy. We use this data set to extract stellar kinematics both of individual stars and from the unresolved integrated light spectrum. We present a velocity and dispersion map from the integrated light and model these kinematics using kinemetry and axisymmetric Jeans models. We also measure CO bandhead strengths of 1,375 spectra from individual stars. We find kinematic complexity in the NSCs radial velocity map including a misalignment of the kinematic position angle by 9 degree counterclockwise relative to the Galactic plane, and indications for a rotating substructure perpendicular to the Galactic plane at a radius of 20" or 0.8pc. We determine the mass of the NSC within r = 4.2pc to 1.4 x 10^7 Msun. We also show that our kinematic data results in a significant underestimation of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass. The kinematic substructure and position angle misalignment may hint at distinct accretion events. This indicates that the MWNSC grew at least partly by the mergers of massive star clusters. Compared to other NSCs, the MWNSC is on the compact side of the r_eff - M_NSC relation. The underestimation of the SMBH mass might be caused by the kinematic misalignment and a stellar population gradient. But it is also possible that there is a bias in SMBH mass measurements obtained with integrated light.
  • (abridged) In this paper we aim at determining the shape, size, and luminosity/mass of the Milky Way Nuclear Star Cluster (MWNSC). We use Spitzer/IRAC images at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometer, where interstellar extinction is at a minimum but the overall emission is still dominated by stars. We correct the 4.5 micrometer image for PAH emission with the help of the IRAC 8.0 micrometer map and for extinction with the help of a [3.6-4.5] colour map. We present an extinction map for the central ~300x200 pc^2 of the Milky Way, as well as a PAH-emission and extinction corrected image of the stellar emission, with a resolution of about 0.2 pc. We find that the MWNSC appears in projection intrinsically point-symmetric, that it is significantly flattened, with its major axis aligned along the Galactic Plane, and that it is centred on the black hole, Sagittarius A*. Its density follows the well known approximate rho~r^{-2}-law at distances of a few parsecs from Sagittarius A*, but may become as steep as rho~r^{-3} at projected radii around 5 pc. We derive a half light radius of 4.2+-0.4 pc, a total luminosity of L_MWNSC=(4.1+-0.4)x10^{7} L_Sun, and a mass of M_{MWNSC}=(2.5+-0.4)x10^{7} M_Sun. The overall properties of the MWNSC agree well with the ones of its extragalactic counterparts, which underlines its role as a template for these objects. Its flattening agrees well with its previously established rotation parallel to Galactic rotation and suggests that it has formed by accretion of material that fell in preferentially along the Galactic Plane. Our findings support the in situ growth scenario for nuclear clusters and emphasize the need to increase the complexity of theoretical models for their formation and for the interaction between their stars and the central black hole in order to include rotation, axisymmetry, and growth in recurrent episodes.
  • There are an enigmatic population of massive stars around the Galactic Center (GC) that were formed some Ma ago. A fraction of these stars has been found to orbit the supermassive black hole, SgrA*, in a projected clockwise disk, which suggests that they were formed in a formerly existing dense disk around SgrA*. We focus on the extended, near-infrared (NIR) sources IRS1W, IRS5, IRS10W, and IRS21 that have been suggested to be young, massive stars that form bow-shocks through their interaction with the ISM. Their nature has impeded accurate determination of their orbital parameters. We aim at establishing their nature and kinematics to test whether they form part of the clockwise disk. We performed NIR multi-wavelength imaging using adaptive optics (AO) and sparse aperture masking (SAM). We introduce a new method for self-calibration of the SAM PSF in dense stellar fields. The emission mechanism, morphology and kinematics of the targets were examined via 3D bow-shock models. We confirm previous findings that IRS21, IRS1W, and IRS5 are bow-shocks created by the interaction between mass-losing stars and the interstellar gas. The nature of IRS10W remains unclear. Our modeling shows that the bow-shock-emission is caused by thermal emission while the scattering of stellar light does not play any significant role. IRS 1W appears to be a bow-shock produced by an anisotropic stellar wind or by locally inhomogeneous ISM density. Our best-fit models provide an estimate of the local proper motion of the ISM in the NA in agreement with the published models. Assuming that all of the sources are tied to SgrA*, their orbital planes were obtained via a Monte-Carlo simulation. Our orbital analysis suggests that they are not part of any of the clockwise disk. We thus add more evidence to recent findings that a large part of the massive stars show apparently random orbital orientations.