• We present the first detection of a jet in the far-IR [O I] lines from an intermediate mass protostar. We have carried out a Herschel/PACS spectral mapping study in the [O I] lines of OMC-2 FIR 3 and FIR 4, two of the most luminous protostars in Orion outside of the Orion Nebula. The spatial morphology of the fine structure line emission reveals the presence of an extended photodissociation region (PDR) and a narrow, but intense jet connecting the two protostars. The jet seen in [O I] emission is spatially aligned with the Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 micron jet and the CO (6-5) molecular outflow centered on FIR 3. The mass loss rate derived from the total [O I] 63 micron line luminosity of the jet is 7.7 x 10^-6 M_sun/yr, more than an order of magnitude higher than that measured for typical low mass class 0 protostars. The implied accretion luminosity is significantly higher than the observed bolometric luminosity of FIR 4, indicating that the [O I] jet is unlikely to be associated with FIR 4. We argue that the peak line emission seen toward FIR 4 originates in the terminal shock produced by the jet driven by FIR 3. The higher mass-loss rate that we find for FIR 3 is consistent with the idea that intermediate mass protostars drive more powerful jets than their low-mass counterparts. Our results also call into question the nature of FIR 4.
  • This paper describes the beginning of the Far-Infrared Surveyor mission study for NASA's Astrophysics Decadal 2020. We describe the scope of the study, and the open process approach of the Science and Technology Definition Team. We are currently developing the science cases and provide some preliminary highlights here. We note key areas for technological innovation and improvements necessary to make a Far-Infrared Surveyor mission a reality.
  • Debris disks are considered to be gas-poor, but recent observations revealed molecular or atomic gas in several 10-40 Myr old systems. We used the APEX and IRAM 30m radiotelescopes to search for CO gas in 20 bright debris disks. In one case, around the 16 Myr old A-type star HD 131835, we discovered a new gas-bearing debris disk, where the CO 3-2 transition was successfully detected. No other individual system exhibited a measurable CO signal. Our Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared images of HD 131835 marginally resolved the disk both at 70 and 100$\mu$m, with a characteristic radius of ~170 au. While in stellar properties HD 131835 resembles $\beta$ Pic, its dust disk properties are similar to those of the most massive young debris disks. With the detection of gas in HD 131835 the number of known debris disks with CO content has increased to four, all of them encircling young ($\leq$40 Myr) A-type stars. Based on statistics within 125 pc, we suggest that the presence of detectable amount of gas in the most massive debris disks around young A-type stars is a common phenomenon. Our current data cannot conclude on the origin of gas in HD 131835. If the gas is secondary, arising from the disruption of planetesimals, then HD 131835 is a comparably young and in terms of its disk more massive analogue of the $\beta$ Pic system. However, it is also possible that this system similarly to HD 21997 possesses a hybrid disk, where the gas material is predominantly primordial, while the dust grains are mostly derived from planetesimals.
  • The statistical tests - done by the authors - are surveyed, which verify the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected at BATSE Catalog. The tests use the counts-in-cells method, an analysis of spherical harmonics, a test based on the two-point correlation function and a method based on multiscale methods. The tests suggest that the intermediate subclass of gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically.
  • The Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex is one of the nearest star-forming sites encompassing three molecular clouds with a different star-formation history, from quiescent (Cha III) to actively forming stars (Cha II), and reaching the end of star-formation (Cha I). To charactize its large-scale structure, we derived column density and temperature maps using PACS and SPIRE observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey, and applied several tools, such as filament tracing, power-spectra, \Delta-variance, and probability distribution functions of column density (PDFs), to derive physical properties. The column density maps reveal a different morphological appearance for the three clouds, with a ridge-like structure for Cha I, a clump-dominated regime for Cha II, and an intricate filamentary network for Cha III. The filament width is measured to be around 0.12\pm0.04 pc in the three clouds, and the filaments found to be gravitationally unstable in Cha I and II, but mostly subcritical in Cha III. Faint filaments (striations) are prominent in Cha I showing a preferred alignment with the large-scale magnetic field. The PDFs of all regions show a lognormal distribution at low column densities. For higher densities, the PDF of Cha I shows a turnover indicative of an extended higher density component, culminating with a power-law tail. Cha II shows a power-law tail with a slope characteristic of gravity. The PDF of Cha III can be best fit by a single lognormal. The turbulence properties of the three regions are found to be similar, pointing towards a scenario where the clouds are impacted by large-scale processes. The magnetic field could possibly play an important role for the star-formation efficiency in the Chamaeleon clouds if proven that it can effectively channel material on Cha I, and possibly Cha II, but probably less efficiently on the quiescent Cha III cloud.
  • We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium through the Delta-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/sub-mm maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters which are useful to characterize different morphological and physical conditions, and to better constrain the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 \mu m constitutes an unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2{\deg}x2{\deg} Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217{\deg} < l < 225{\deg}, -2{\deg} < b < 0{\deg}). The low level of confusion along the line of sight testified by CO observations makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values of the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 < \beta < 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to the comparison with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.
  • Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similarly to HR8799, {\ss} Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ~6.0x5.4 arcsec (540x490 AU) and disk inclination of ~25 degree. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its re-projected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modelling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks co-exist.
  • We report on the Herschel Gould Belt survey (HGBS) of ChaII, focusing on the detection of Class I to III young stellar objects (YSOs). We aim at characterizing the circumstellar material around these YSOs and understanding which disk parameters are most likely constrained by the new HGBS data. We recovered 29 out of the 63 known YSOs in ChaII with a detection in at least one of the PACS/SPIRE pass-bands: 3 Class I YSOs (i.e.,100%), 1 Flat source (i.e., 50%), 21 Class II objects (i.e., 55%), 3 Class III objects (i.e, 16%) and the unclassified source IRAS 12522-7640. We explore PACS/SPIRE colors of this sample and present modeling of their SEDs using the RADMC-2D radiative transfer code. We find that YSO colors are confined in specific regions of PACS/SPIRE color-color diagrams. These color ranges are expected to be only marginally contaminated by extragalactic sources and field stars and, hence, provide a useful YSO selection tool when applied altogether. We were able to model the SED of 26 out of the 29 detected YSOs. We discuss the degeneracy/limitations of our SED fitting results and adopt the Bayesian method to estimate the probability of different values for the derived disk parameters. The Cha II YSOs present typical disk inner radii around 0.1 AU. The lower limit to Rc is typically around 50 AU. The lower limits to Mdisk are proportional to the stellar masses with a typical 0.3% ratio, i.e., in the range estimated in the literature for young Class II stars and brown dwarfs across a broad range of stellar masses. The estimated flaring angles, although very uncertain, point towards rather flat disks (1+phi less than 1.2), as found for low-mass M-type YSO samples in other star forming regions. Thus, our results support the idea that disk properties show a dependence on stellar properties.
  • Transitional disks are circumstellar disks with inner holes that in some cases are produced by planets and/or substellar companions in these systems. For this reason, these disks are extremely important for the study of planetary system formation. The Herschel Space Observatory provides an unique opportunity for studying the outer regions of protoplanetary disks. In this work we update previous knowledge on the transitional disks in the Chamaeleon I and II regions with data from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We propose a new method for transitional disk classification based on the WISE 12 micron-PACS 70 micron color, together with inspection of the Herschel images. We applied this method to the population of Class II sources in the Chamaeleon region and studied the spectral energy distributions of the transitional disks in the sample. We also built the median spectral energy distribution of Class II objects in these regions for comparison with transitional disks. The proposed method allows a clear separation of the known transitional disks from the Class II sources. We find 6 transitional disks, all previously known, and identify 5 objects previously thought to be transitional as possibly non-transitional. We find higher fluxes at the PACS wavelengths in the sample of transitional disks than those of Class II objects. We show the Herschel 70 micron band to be an efficient tool for transitional disk identification. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of Herschel reveals a significant contamination level among the previously identified transitional disk candidates for the two regions, which calls for a revision of previous samples of transitional disks in other regions. The systematic excess found at the PACS bands could be a result of the mechanism that produces the transitional phase, or an indication of different evolutionary paths for transitional disks and Class II sources.
  • We present far-IR (57-196 mu) spectra of 21 protostars in the Orion molecular clouds, obtained with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) onboard the Herschel Space observatory, as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS) program. We analyzed the CO emission lines (J_up = 14-46) in the PACS spectra, extracted within a projected distance of <= 2000 AU centered on the protostar. The total luminosity of the CO lines observed with PACS (L(CO)) is found to increase with increasing L_bol. The CO rotational temperature implied by the line ratios increases with J, and at least 3-4 rotational temperature components are required to fit the observed rotational diagram. The rotational temperature components are remarkably invariant between protostars and show no dependence on L_bol, T_bol or envelope density, implying that if the emitting gas is in LTE, the CO emission must arise in multiple temperature components that remain independent of L_bol over two orders of magnitudes. The observed CO emission can also be modeled as arising from a single temperature gas component or from a medium with a power-law temperature distribution; both of these require sub-thermally excited molecular gas at low densities (n(H_2) <= 10^6 cm^-3) and high temperatures (T >= 2000 K). Our results suggest that the contribution from PDRs along the envelope cavity walls is unlikely to be the dominant component of the CO emission observed with PACS. Instead, the "universality" of the rotational temperatures and the observed correlation between L(CO) and L_bol can most easily be explained if the observed CO emission originates in shock-heated, hot (T >= 2000 K), sub-thermally excited (n(H_2) <= 10^6 cm^-3) molecular gas. Post-shock gas at these densities is more likely to be found within the outflow cavities along the molecular outflow or along the cavity walls at radii >= several 100-1000 AU.
  • Context: Observations of transitional disks give us an understanding of the formation of planets and planetary systems such as our own. But care must be taken in the identification of such sources: the higher spatial resolution of the Herschel Space Observatory provides a new view on the origin of the far-infrared and sub-millimeter excesses observed. Aims: We review the nature of previously known transitional disks in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region with Herschel data. Methods: We analyze Herschel PACS and SPIRE images of the young star T54 together with ancillary images. We also analyze its spectral energy distribution and indications from optical and mid-infrared spectroscopy. Results: We detect extended emission in the PACS 70 \mu m image ~6" off source at a position angle of 196{\deg} from T54. The emission detected at longer wavelength (PACS 100, 160, SPIRE 250 and 350 \mu m) is also offset from the position of the star. This suggests that the excess observed in the far-infrared part of the SED is not fully associated with T54. Conclusions: Herschel images show that the far-infrared excess seen in T54 is not due to a transitional disk but to extended emission south-west of the source. The object still shows point-like and now downscaled excess at mid-infrared wavelengths, but its origin cannot be constrained without higher spatial resolution data. However, different indications point towards an evolved disk or extended unresolved emission close to the source.
  • Aims. We analyze the surroundings of HD 97300, one of two intermediate-mass stars in the Chamaeleon I star-forming region. The star is known to be surrounded by a conspicuous ring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Methods. We present infrared images taken with Herschel and Spitzer using 11 different broad-band filters between 3.6 um and 500 um. We compare the morphology of the emission using cuts along different position angles. We construct spectral energy distributions, which we compare to different dust models, and calculate dust temperatures. We also derive opacity maps and analyze the density structure of the environment of HD 97300. Results. We find that HD 97300 has no infrared excess at or below 24 um, confirming its zero-age main-sequence nature. The morphology of the ring is very similar between 3.6 um and 24 um. The emission at these wavelengths is dominated by either PAH features or PAH continuum. At longer wavelengths, only the northwestern part of the ring is visible. A fit to the 100-500 um observations suggests that the emission is due to relatively warm (~26 K) dust. The temperature gradually decreases with increasing distance from the ring. We find a general decrease in the density from north to south, and an approximate 10% density increase in the northeastern part of the ring. Conclusions. Our results are consistent with the theory that the ring around HD 97300 is essentially a bubble blown into the surrounding interstellar matter and heated by the star.
  • We summarize the first results from the Gould Belt survey, obtained toward the Aquila Rift and Polaris Flare regions during the 'science demonstration phase' of Herschel. Our 70-500 micron images taken in parallel mode with the SPIRE and PACS cameras reveal a wealth of filamentary structure, as well as numerous dense cores embedded in the filaments. Between ~ 350 and 500 prestellar cores and ~ 45-60 Class 0 protostars can be identified in the Aquila field, while ~ unbound starless cores and no protostars are observed in the Polaris field. The prestellar core mass function (CMF) derived for the Aquila region bears a strong resemblance to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), already confirming the close connection between the CMF and the IMF with much better statistics than earlier studies. Comparing and contrasting our Herschel results in Aquila and Polaris, we propose an observationally-driven scenario for core formation according to which complex networks of long, thin filaments form first within molecular clouds, and then the densest filaments fragment into a number of prestellar cores via gravitational instability.
  • We present a preliminary analysis of the small-scale structure found in new 70-520 micron continuum maps of the Rosette molecular cloud (RMC), obtained with the SPIRE and PACS instruments of the Herschel Space Observatory. We find 473 clumps within the RMC using a new structure identification algorithm, with sizes up to ~1.0 pc in diameter. A comparison with recent Spitzer maps reveals that 371 clumps are "starless" (without an associated young stellar object), while 102 are "protostellar." Using the respective values of dust temperature, we determine the clumps have masses (M_C) over the range -0.75 <= log (M_C/M_sun) <= 2.50. Linear fits to the high-mass tails of the resulting clump mass spectra (CMS) have slopes that are consistent with those found for high-mass clumps identified in CO emission by other groups.
  • The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) is one of the three science instruments on ESA's far infrared and submillimetre observatory. It employs two Ge:Ga photoconductor arrays (stressed and unstressed) with 16x25 pixels, each, and two filled silicon bolometer arrays with 16x32 and 32x64 pixels, respectively, to perform integral-field spectroscopy and imaging photometry in the 60-210\mu\ m wavelength regime. In photometry mode, it simultaneously images two bands, 60-85\mu\ m or 85-125\mu\m and 125-210\mu\ m, over a field of view of ~1.75'x3.5', with close to Nyquist beam sampling in each band. In spectroscopy mode, it images a field of 47"x47", resolved into 5x5 pixels, with an instantaneous spectral coverage of ~1500km/s and a spectral resolution of ~175km/s. We summarise the design of the instrument, describe observing modes, calibration, and data analysis methods, and present our current assessment of the in-orbit performance of the instrument based on the Performance Verification tests. PACS is fully operational, and the achieved performance is close to or better than the pre-launch predictions.
  • S. Molinari, B. Swinyard, J. Bally, M. Barlow, J. P. Bernard, P. Martin, T. Moore, A. Noriega-Crespo, R. Plume, L. Testi, A. Zavagno, A. Abergel, B. Ali, L. Anderson, P. André, J. P. Baluteau, C. Battersby, M. T. Beltrán, M. Benedettini, N. Billot, J. Blommaert, S. Bontemps, F. Boulanger, J. Brand, C. Brunt, M. Burton, L. Calzoletti, S. Carey, P. Caselli, R. Cesaroni, J. Cernicharo, S. Chakrabarti, A. Chrysostomou, M. Cohen, M. Compiegne, P. de Bernardis, G. de Gasperis, A. M. di Giorgio, D. Elia, F. Faustini, N. Flagey, Y. Fukui, G. A. Fuller, K. Ganga, P. Garcia-Lario, J. Glenn, P. F. Goldsmith, M. J. Griffin, M. Hoare, M. Huang, D. Ikhenaode, C. Joblin, G. Joncas, M. Juvela, J. M. Kirk, G. Lagache, J. Z. Li, T. L. Lim, S. D. Lord, M. Marengo, D. J. Marshall, S. Masi, F. Massi, M. Matsuura, V. Minier, M. A. Miville-Deschenes, L. A. Montier, L. Morgan, F. Motte, J. C. Mottram, T. G. Mueller, P. Natoli, J. Neves, L. Olmi, R. Paladini, D. Paradis, H. Parsons, N. Peretto, M. Pestalozzi, S. Pezzuto, F. Piacentini, L. Piazzo, D. Polychroni, M. Pomarès, C. C. Popescu, W. T. Reach, I. Ristorcelli, J. F. Robitaille, T. Robitaille, J. A. Rodón, A. Roy, P. Royer, D. Russeil, P. Saraceno, M. Sauvage, P. Schilke, E. Schisano, N. Schneider, F. Schuller, B. Schulz, B. Sibthorpe, H. A. Smith, M. D. Smith, L. Spinoglio, D. Stamatellos, F. Strafella, G. S. Stringfellow, E. Sturm, R. Taylor, M. A. Thompson, A. Traficante, R. J. Tuffs, G. Umana, L. Valenziano, R. Vavrek, M. Veneziani, S. Viti, C. Waelkens, D. Ward-Thompson, G. White, L. A. Wilcock, F. Wyrowski, H. W. Yorke, Q. Zhang
    May 18, 2010 astro-ph.GA
    We present the first results from the science demonstration phase for the Hi-GAL survey, the Herschel key-project that will map the inner Galactic Plane of the Milky Way in 5 bands. We outline our data reduction strategy and present some science highlights on the two observed 2{\deg} x 2{\deg} tiles approximately centered at l=30{\deg} and l=59{\deg}. The two regions are extremely rich in intense and highly structured extended emission which shows a widespread organization in filaments. Source SEDs can be built for hundreds of objects in the two fields, and physical parameters can be extracted, for a good fraction of them where the distance could be estimated. The compact sources (which we will call 'cores' in the following) are found for the most part to be associated with the filaments, and the relationship to the local beam-averaged column density of the filament itself shows that a core seems to appear when a threshold around A_V of about 1 is exceeded for the regions in the l=59{\deg} field; a A_V value between 5 and 10 is found for the l=30{\deg} field, likely due to the relatively larger distances of the sources. This outlines an exciting scenario where diffuse clouds first collapse into filaments, which later fragment to cores where the column density has reached a critical level. In spite of core L/M ratios being well in excess of a few for many sources, we find core surface densities between 0.03 and 0.5 g cm-2. Our results are in good agreement with recent MHD numerical simulations of filaments forming from large-scale converging flows.
  • As part of the science demonstration phase of the Herschel mission of the Gould Belt Key Program, the Aquila Rift molecular complex has been observed. The complete ~ 3.3deg x 3.3deg imaging with SPIRE 250/350/500 micron and PACS 70/160 micron allows a deep investigation of embedded protostellar phases, probing of the dust emission from warm inner regions at 70 and 160 micron to the bulk of the cold envelopes between 250 and 500 micron. We used a systematic detection technique operating simultaneously on all Herschel bands to build a sample of protostars. Spectral energy distributions are derived to measure luminosities and envelope masses, and to place the protostars in an M_env - L_bol evolutionary diagram. The spatial distribution of protostars indicates three star-forming sites in Aquila, with W40/Sh2-64 HII region by far the richest. Most of the detected protostars are newly discovered. For a reduced area around the Serpens South cluster, we could compare the Herschel census of protostars with Spitzer results. The Herschel protostars are younger than in Spitzer with 7 Class 0 YSOs newly revealed by Herschel. For the entire Aquila field, we find a total of ~ 45-60 Class 0 YSOs discovered by Herschel. This confirms the global statistics of several hundred Class~0 YSOs that should be found in the whole Gould Belt survey.
  • We presented the results of several statistical tests of the randomness in the angular sky-distribution of gamma-ray bursts in BATSE Catalog. Thirteen different tests were presented based on Voronoi tesselation, Minimal spanning tree and Multifractal spectrum for five classes (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) of gamma-ray bursts, separately. The long1 and long2 classes are distributed randomly. The intermediate subclass, in accordance with the earlier results of the authors, is distributed non-randomly. Concerning the short subclass earlier statistical tests also suggested some departure from the random distribution, but not on a high enough confidence level. The new tests presented in this article suggest also non-randomness here.
  • We studied the complete randomness of the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE. Since GRBs seem to be a mixture of objects of different physical nature we divided the BATSE sample into 5 subsamples (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) based on their durations and peak fluxes and studied the angular distributions separately. We used three methods, Voronoi tesselation, minimal spanning tree and multifractal spectra to search for non-randomness in the subsamples. To investigate the eventual non-randomness in the subsamples we defined 13 test-variables (9 from the Voronoi tesselation, 3 from the minimal spanning tree and one from the multifractal spectrum). Assuming that the point patterns obtained from the BATSE subsamples are fully random we made Monte Carlo simulations taking into account the BATSE's sky-exposure function. The MC simulations enabled us to test the null hypothesis i.e. that the angular distributions are fully random. We tested the randomness by binomial test and introducing squared Euclidean distances in the parameter space of the test-variables. We concluded that the short1, short2 groups deviate significantly (99.90%, 99.98%) from the fully randomness in the distribution of the squared Euclidean distances but it is not the case at the long samples. At the intermediate group the squared Euclidean distances also give significant deviation (98.51%).
  • The low energy spectra of some gamma-ray bursts' show excess components beside the power-law dependence. The consequences of such a feature allows to estimate the gamma photometric redshift of the long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. There is good correlation between the measured optical and the estimated gamma photometric redshifts. The estimated redshift values for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to z=4, while for the the faint long bursts - which should be up to z=20 - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method. The redshift distribution of all the gamma-ray bursts with known optical redshift agrees quite well with the BATSE based gamma photometric redshift distribution.
  • It is known that the soft tail of the gamma-ray bursts' spectra show excesses from the exact power-law dependence. In this article we show that this departure can be detected in the peak flux ratios of different BATSE DISCSC energy channels. This effect allows to estimate the redshift of the bright long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. A verification of these redshifts is obtained for the 8 GRB which have both BATSE DISCSC data and measured optical spectroscopic redshifts. There is good correlation between the measured and esti redshifts, and the average error is $\Delta z \approx 0.33$. The method is similar to the photometric redshift estimation of galaxies in the optical range, hence it can be called as "gamma photometric redshift estimation". The estimated redshifts for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to $z \simeq 4$. For the the faint long bursts - which should be up to $z \simeq 20$ - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the star forming region ISOSS J 20298+3559, which was identified by a cross-correlation of cold compact sources from the 170 micron ISOPHOT Serendipity Survey (ISOSS) database coinciding with objects detected by the MSX, 2MASS and IRAS infrared surveys. ISOSS J 20298+3559 is associated with a massive dark cloud complex (M ~ 760 M$_{\odot}$) and located in the Cygnus X giant molecular cloud. We derive a distance of 1800 pc on the basis of optical extinction data. The low average dust temperature (T ~ 16 K) and large mass (M ~ 120 M$_{\odot}$) of the dense inner part of the cloud, which has not been dispersed, indicates a recent begin of star formation. The youth of the region is supported by the early evolutionary stage of several pre- and protostellar objects discovered across the regio n: I) Two candidate Class 0 objects with masses of 8 and 3.5 M$_{\odot}$, II) a gravitationally bound, cold (T ~ 12 K) and dense (n(H$_{2}$) \~ 2 x 10$^{5}$ cm$^{-3}$) cloud core with a mass of 50 M$_{\odot}$ and III) a Herbig B2 star with a mass of 6.5 M$_{\odot}$ and a bolometric luminosity of 2200 L$_{\odot}$, showing evidence for ongoing accretion and a stellar age of less than 40000 years. The dereddened SED of the Herbig star is well reproduced by an accretion disc + star model. The externally heated cold cloud core is a good candidate for a massive pre-protostellar object. The star formation efficiency in the central cloud region is about 14 %.
  • In the article a test is developed, which allows to test the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected at the Current BATSE Catalog. The method is a modified version of the well-known counts-in-cells test, and fully eliminates the non-uniform sky-exposure function of BATSE instrument. Applying this method to the case of all gamma-ray bursts no intrinsic non-randomness is found. The test also did not find intrinsic non-randomnesses for the short and long gamma-ray bursts, respectively. On the other hand, using the method to the new intermediate subclass of gamma-ray bursts, the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness for 181 intermediate gamma-ray bursts is rejected on the 96.4% confidence level. Taking 92 dimmer bursts from this subclass itself, we obtain the surprising result: This "dim" subclass of the intermediate subclass has an intrinsic non-randomness on the 99.3% confidence level. On the other hand, the 89 "bright" bursts show no intrinsic non-randomness.
  • The counts-in-cells and the two-point angular correlation function method are used to test the randomnesses in the angular distributions of both the all gamma-ray bursts collected at BATSE Catalog, and also their three subclasses ("short", "intermediate", "long"). The methods elimate the non-zero sky-exposure function of BATSE instrument. Both tests suggest intrinsic non-randomnesses for the intermediate subclass; for the remaining three cases only the correlation function method. The confidence levels are between 95% and 99.9%. Separating the GRBs into two parts ("dim half" and "bright half", respectively) we obtain the result that the "dim" half shows a non-randomness on the 99.3% confidence level from the counts-in-cells test.
  • The anisotropy of the sky distribution of 2025 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) collected in Current BATSE catalog is confirmed. It is shown that the quadrupole term being proportional to $\sim \sin 2b \sin l$ is non-zero with a probability 99.9%. The occurrence of this anisotropy term is then supported by the binomial test even with the probability 99.97%. It is also argued that this anisotropy cannot be caused exclusively by instrumental effects due to the non-uniform sky exposure of BATSE instrument; there should exist also some intrinsic anisotropy in the angular distribution of GRBs. Separating GRBs into short and long subclasses, it is shown that the 251 short ones are distributed anisotropically, but the 681 long ones seem to be distributed still isotropically. The 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that they are distributed differently with a 98.7% probability. The character of anisotropy suggests that the cosmological origin of short GRBs further holds, and there is no evidence for their Galactical origin. The work in essence contains the key ideas and results of a recently published paper (\cite{balazs}), to which the new result following from the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is added, too.