• Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the observations and reliable estimates of their absolute magnitudes. The extracted mid-IR spectra were analyzed using a modified standard thermal model (STM) and a thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account the shape and geometry of the large primary at the time of the Spitzer observation. We derived a reliable estimate of the size, albedo, and beaming factor for each of these asteroids, representing three main taxonomic groups: C, S, and X. For large (volume-equivalent system diameter Deq $\lt$ 130 km) binary asteroids, the TPM analysis indicates a low thermal inertia ($\Gamma$ < $\sim$100 J s-1/2K-1m-2) and their emissivity spectra display strong mineral features, implying that they are covered with a thick layer of thermally insulating regolith. The smaller (surface-equivalent system diameter Deff $\lt$17 km) asteroids also show some emission lines of minerals, but they are significantly weaker, consistent with regoliths with coarser grains, than those of the large binary asteroids. The average bulk densities of these multiple asteroids vary from 0.7-1.7 g/cm3 (P-, C- type) to $\sim$2 g/cm3 (S-type). The highest density is estimated for the M-type (22) Kalliope (3.2 $\pm$ 0.9 g/cm3). The spectral energy distributions (SED) and emissivity spectra, made available as a supplement document, could help to constrain the surface compositions of these asteroids.
  • We study large trans-neptunian objects (TNOs) using stellar occultations. We derive precise astrometric predictions for stellar occultations by Eris, Haumea, Ixion, Makemake, Orcus, Quaoar, Sedna, Varuna, 2002 TX300, and 2003 AZ84 for 2011-2015. We construct local astrometric catalogs of stars in the UCAC2 (Second US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog) frame covering the sky path of these objects. For that purpose, during 2007-2009, we carried out an observational program at the ESO2p2/WFI (2.2 m Max-Planck ESO telescope with the Wide Field Imager) instrument. Astrometric catalogs with proper motions were produced for each TNO, containing more than 5.35 million stars covering the sky paths with 30' width in declination. The magnitude completeness is about R = 19 with a limit of about R = 21. We predicted 2717 stellar occultation candidates for all targets. Ephemeris offsets with about from 50 mas to 100 mas precision were applied to each TNO orbit to improve the predictions. They were obtained during 2007-2010 from a parallel observational campaign carried out with from 0.6 m to 2.2 m in size telescopes. This extends our previous work for the Pluto system to large TNOs, using the same observational and astrometric procedures. The obtained astrometric catalogs are useful for follow-up programs at small to large telescopes used to improve the candidate star positions and TNO ephemeris. They also furnish valuable photometric information for the field stars. For each TNO, updates on the ephemeris offsets and candidate star positions (geometric conditions of predictions and finding charts) are made available in the web by the group.
  • The large number and all-sky distribution of quasars from different surveys, along with their presence in large, deep astrometric catalogs,enables the building of an optical materialization of the ICRS following its defining principles. Namely: that it is kinematically non-rotating with respect to the ensemble of distant extragalactic objects; aligned with the mean equator and dynamical equinox of J2000; and realized by a list of adopted coordinates of extragalatic sources. Starting from the updated and presumably complete LQAC list of QSOs, the initial optical positions of those quasars are found in the USNO B1.0 and GSC2.3 catalogs, and from the SDSS DR5. The initial positions are next placed onto UCAC2-based reference frames, following by an alignment with the ICRF, to which were added the most precise sources from the VLBA calibrator list and the VLA calibrator list - when reliable optical counterparts exist. Finally, the LQRF axes are inspected through spherical harmonics, contemplating to define right ascension, declination and magnitude terms. The LQRF contains J2000 referred equatorial coordinates for 100,165 quasars, well represented across the sky, from -83.5 to +88.5 degrees in declination, and with 10 arcmin being the average distance between adjacent elements. The global alignment with the ICRF is 1.5 mas, and the individual position accuracies are represented by a Poisson distribution that peaks at 139 mas in right ascension and 130 mas in declination. It is complemented by redshift and photometry information from the LQAC. The LQRF is designed to be an astrometric frame, but it is also the basis for the GAIA mission initial quasars' list, and can be used as a test bench for quasars' space distribution and luminosity function studies.
  • he triple asteroidal system (87) Sylvia is composed of a 280-km primary and two small moonlets named Romulus and Remus (Marchis et al 2005). Sylvia is located in the main asteroid belt. The satellites are in nearly equatorial circular orbits around the primary. In the present work we study the stability of the satellites Romulus and Remus, in order to identify the effects and the contribution of each perturber. The results from the 3-body problem, Sylvia-Romulus-Remus, show no significant variation of their orbital elements. However, the inclinations of the satellites present a long period evolution, when the Sun is included in the system. Such amplitude is amplified when Jupiter is included. An analysis of these results show that Romulus and Remus are librating in a secular resonance and their longitude of the nodes are locked to each other. The satellites get caught in an evection resonance with Jupiter. However, the orbital evolutions of the satellites became completely stable when the oblateness of Sylvia is included in the simulations.