• The reionization of the Universe is one of the most important topics of present day astrophysical research. The most plausible candidates for the reionization process are star-forming galaxies, which according to the predictions of the majority of the theoretical and semi-analytical models should dominate the HI ionizing background at z~3. We aim at measuring the Lyman continuum escape fraction, which is one of the key parameters to compute the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the UV background. We have used ultra-deep U-band imaging (U=30.2mag at 1sigma) by LBC/LBT in the CANDELS/GOODS-North field, as well as deep imaging in COSMOS and EGS fields, in order to estimate the Lyman continuum escape fraction of 69 star-forming galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts at 3.27<z<3.40 to faint magnitude limits (L=0.2L*, or equivalently M1500~-19). We have measured through stacks a stringent upper limit (<1.7% at 1sigma) for the relative escape fraction of HI ionizing photons from bright galaxies (L>L*), while for the faint population (L=0.2L*) the limit to the escape fraction is ~10%. We have computed the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the observed UV background at z~3 and we have found that it is not enough to keep the Universe ionized at these redshifts, unless their escape fraction increases significantly (>10%) at low luminosities (M1500>-19). We compare our results on the Lyman continuum escape fraction of high-z galaxies with recent estimates in the literature and discuss future prospects to shed light on the end of the Dark Ages. In the future, strong gravitational lensing will be fundamental to measure the Lyman continuum escape fraction down to faint magnitudes (M1500~-16) which are inaccessible with the present instrumentation on blank fields.
  • We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of (1.13+/-0.15) x 10^9 M_sun is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for (3.2+/-0.4) x 10^8 M_sun of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally-supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies <20 Myr ago disrupted a pre-existing molecular gas reservoir within the BCG. Most of the molecular gas, (7.8+/-0.9) x 10^8 M_sun, is located in the filament. The CO emission is co-spatial with a 10^4 K emission-line nebula and soft X-rays from 0.5 keV gas, indicating that the molecular gas has cooled out of the intracluster medium over a period of 25-100 Myr. The filament trails an X-ray cavity, suggesting that the gas has cooled from low entropy gas that has been lifted out of the cluster core and become thermally unstable. We are unable to distinguish between inflow and outflow along the filament with the present data. Cloud velocities along the filament are consistent with gravitational free-fall near the plane of the sky, although their increasing blueshifts with radius are consistent with outflow.
  • We study of the role of major mergers (mass ratios >1:4) in driving size growth in high-redshift (1<z<2) spheroidal galaxies (SGs) with stellar masses between 10^9.5 MSun and 10^10.7 MSun. This is a largely unexplored mass range at this epoch, containing the progenitors of more massive SGs on which the bulk of the size-evolution literature is based. We visually split our SGs into systems that are relaxed and those that exhibit tidal features indicative of a recent merger. Numerical simulations indicate that, given the depth of our images, only tidal features due to major mergers will be detectable at these epochs (features from minor mergers being too faint), making the disturbed SGs a useful route for estimating major-merger-driven size growth. The disturbed SGs are offset in size from their relaxed counterparts, lying close to the upper envelope of the local size -- mass relation. The mean size ratio of the disturbed SGs to their relaxed counterparts is ~2. Combining this observed size growth with empirical major-merger histories from the literature suggests that the size evolution of a significant fraction (around two-thirds) of SGs in this mass range could be driven by major mergers. If, as is likely, our galaxies are progenitors of more massive M > 10^10.7 MSun SGs at z<1, then major mergers are also likely to play an important role in the size growth of at least some massive SGs in this mass range.
  • We present HST/STIS optical and Gemini/NIFS near-IR IFU spectroscopy, and archival HST imaging of the triplet of super star clusters (A1, A2 and A3) in the core of the M82 starburst. Using model fits to the STIS spectra, and the weakness of red supergiant CO absorption features (appearing at ~6 Myr) in the NIFS H-band spectra, the ages of A2 and A3 are $4.5\pm1.0$~Myr. A1 has strong CO bands, consistent with our previously determined age of $6.4\pm0.5$~Myr. The photometric masses of the three clusters are 4--$7\times10^5$~\Msol, and their sizes are $R_{\rm eff}=159$, 104, 59~mas ($\sim$2.8, 1.8, 1.0~pc) for A1,2 and 3. The STIS spectra yielded radial velocities of $320\pm2$, $330\pm6$, and $336\pm5$~\kms\ for A1,2, and 3, placing them at the eastern end of the $x_2$ orbits of M82's bar. Clusters A2 and A3 are in high density (800--1000~\cmt) environments, and like A1, are surrounded by compact H\two\ regions. We suggest the winds from A2 and A3 have stalled, as in A1, due to the high ISM ambient pressure. We propose that the 3 clusters were formed \textit{in-situ} on the outer $x_2$ orbits in regions of dense molecular gas subsequently ionized by the rapidly evolving starburst. The similar radial velocities of the 3 clusters and their small projected separation of $\sim 25$~pc suggest that they may merge in the near future unless this is prevented by velocity shearing.
  • We investigate the chemo-kinematic properties of the Milky Way disc by exploring the first year of data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and compare our results to smaller optical high-resolution samples in the literature, as well as results from lower resolution surveys such as GCS, SEGUE and RAVE. We start by selecting a high-quality sample in terms of chemistry ($\sim$ 20.000 stars) and, after computing distances and orbital parameters for this sample, we employ a number of useful subsets to formulate constraints on Galactic chemical and chemodynamical evolution processes in the Solar neighbourhood and beyond (e.g., metallicity distributions -- MDFs, [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams, and abundance gradients). Our red giant sample spans distances as large as 10 kpc from the Sun. We find remarkable agreement between the recently published local (d $<$ 100 pc) high-resolution high-S/N HARPS sample and our local HQ sample (d $<$ 1 kpc). The local MDF peaks slightly below solar metallicity, and exhibits an extended tail towards [Fe/H] $= -$1, whereas a sharper cut-off is seen at larger metallicities. The APOGEE data also confirm the existence of a gap in the [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] abundance diagram. When expanding our sample to cover three different Galactocentric distance bins, we find the high-[$\alpha$/Fe] stars to be rare towards the outer zones, as previously suggested in the literature. For the gradients in [Fe/H] and [$\alpha$/Fe], measured over a range of 6 $ < $ R $ <$ 11 kpc in Galactocentric distance, we find a good agreement with the gradients traced by the GCS and RAVE dwarf samples. For stars with 1.5 $<$ z $<$ 3 kpc, we find a positive metallicity gradient and a negative gradient in [$\alpha$/Fe].
  • We have used a combination of high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and wide-field ground-based observations, in ultraviolet and optical bands, to study the blue straggler star population of the massive outer-halo globular cluster NGC 5824, over its entire radial extent. We have computed the center of gravity of the cluster and constructed the radial density profile, from detailed star counts. The profile is well reproduced by a Wilson model with a small core (r_c \simeq 4.4 arcsec) and a concentration parameter c \simeq 2.74. We also present the first age determination for this cluster. From the comparison with isochrones, we have found t=13\pm0.5 Gyr. We discuss this result in the context of the observed age-metallicity relation of Galactic globular clusters. A total of 60 bright blue stragglers has been identified. Their radial distribution is found to be bimodal, with a central peak, a well defined minimum at r \sim 20 arcsec, and an upturn at large radii. In the framework of the dynamical clock defined by Ferraro et al. (2012), this feature suggests that NGC 5824 is a cluster of intermediate dynamical age.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We present a combination of high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope and wide-field ground-based and Galaxy Evolution Explorer data of the Galactic Globular Cluster M10 (NGC6254). By using this large data-set we determined the center of gravity of the cluster and we built its density profile from star counts over its entire radial extension. We find that the density profile is well reproduced by a single-mass King model with structural parameters c=1.41 and r_c=41". We also studied the Blue Straggler Star population and its radial distribution. We count a total number of 120 BSS within the tidal radius. Their radial distribution is bimodal: highly peaked in the cluster center, decreasing at intermediate distances and rising again outwards. We discuss these results in the context of the dynamical clock scheme presented by Ferraro et al. (2012) and of recent results about the radial distribution of binary systems in this cluster.
  • We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 sq. arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z=1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope (beta) is redder than at high redshift (z>3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z=1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L*<~L<~2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1-sigma uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of ~0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of ~0.90. These relations hold true --- within luminosities probed in this study --- for LBGs from z~1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z~2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z>3, a true Lyman break selection at z~2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.
  • We study the significance of major-merger-driven star formation in the early Universe, by quantifying the contribution of this process to the total star formation budget in 80 massive (M* > 10^10 MSun) galaxies at z~2. Employing visually-classified morphologies from rest-frame V-band HST imaging, we find that 55+/-14% of the star formation budget is hosted by non-interacting late-types, with 27+/-8% in major mergers and 18+/-6% in spheroids. Given that a system undergoing a major merger continues to experience star formation driven by other processes at this epoch (e.g. cold accretion, minor mergers), ~27% is an upper limit to the major-merger contribution to star formation activity at this epoch. The ratio of the average specific star formation rate in major mergers to that in the non-interacting late-types is ~2.2:1, suggesting that the enhancement of star formation due to major merging is typically modest, and that just under half the star formation in systems experiencing major mergers is unrelated to the merger itself. Taking this into account, we estimate that the actual major-merger contribution to the star formation budget may be as low as ~15%. While our study does not preclude a major-merger-dominated era in the very early Universe, if the major-merger contribution to star formation does not evolve strongly into larger look-back times, then this process has a relatively insignificant role in driving stellar mass assembly over cosmic time.
  • We study ~330 massive (M* > 10^9.5 MSun), newborn spheroidal galaxies (SGs) around the epoch of peak star formation (1<z<3), to explore the high-redshift origin of SGs and gain insight into when and how the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe formed. The sample is drawn from the HST/WFC3 Early-Release Science programme, which provides deep 10-filter (0.2 - 1.7 micron) HST imaging over a third of the GOODS-South field. We find that the star formation episodes that built the SGs likely peaked in the redshift range 2<z<5 (with a median of z~3) and have decay timescales shorter than ~1.5 Gyr. Starburst timescales and ages show no trend with stellar mass in the range 10^9.5 < M* < 10^10.5 MSun. However, the timescales show increased scatter towards lower values (<0.3 Gyr) for M* > 10^10.5 MSun, and an age trend becomes evident in this mass regime: SGs with M* > 10^11.5 MSun are ~2 Gyrs older than their counterparts with M* < 10^10.5 MSun. Nevertheless, a smooth downsizing trend with galaxy mass is not observed, and the large scatter in starburst ages indicate that SGs are not a particularly coeval population. Around half of the blue SGs appear not to drive their star formation via major mergers, and those that have experienced a recent major merger, show only modest enhancements (~40%) in their specific star formation rates. Our empirical study indicates that processes other than major mergers (e.g. violent disk instability driven by cold streams and/or minor mergers) likely play a dominant role in building SGs, and creating a significant fraction of the old stellar populations that dominate today's Universe.
  • In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually-selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 < z < 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically-confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and ACS GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broad-band photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 11< log(M [Solar]) < 12. By transforming the observed photometry into the GALEX FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and SDSS g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V)=3.5 and (NUV-V)=3.3, with 1$\sigma$ standard deviations approximately equal to 1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star-formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent (<~50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star-formation episodes are activated, are discussed.
  • We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 micron grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [OIII], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2<z<1.4, 1.2<z<2.2 and 2.0<z<3.3 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R~210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R~130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [SII] and [SIII] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star-formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m(AB)~25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Delta(z)~0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously-measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m(AB)=26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z>2.
  • We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 sq.arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in 3 UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W- and F336W-dropouts, which are z~1.7, 2.1 and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z~2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well studied z~>3 and z~0 regimes, (2) the combined number counts agrees very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, and the faint-end slope, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z<3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z~1 to z~9, and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.
  • We present results on the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at 1<z<2 drawn from the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no on-going star formation at z>1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in ~40 square arcmin to H<25 mag. We supplement spectroscopic redshifts from the literature with photometric redshifts determined from the 15-band photometry from 0.22-8 micron. We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical PSF. We find that size evolution is a strong function of stellar mass, with the most massive (M* ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies undergoing the most rapid evolution from z~2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1+z)^{-alpha}, we find a tentative scaling between alpha and stellar mass of alpha ~ -1.8+1.4 log(M*/10^9 Msol). We briefly discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the dynamical evolution of the red galaxies.
  • We have obtained mid-infrared spectra of nine cool-core galaxy clusters with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. X-ray, ultraviolet and optical observations have demonstrated that each of these clusters hosts a cooling flow which seems to be fueling vigorous star formation in the brightest cluster galaxy. Our goal is to use the advantages of the mid-infrared band to improve estimates of star formation. Our spectra are characterized by diverse morphologies ranging from classic starbursts to flat spectra with surprisingly weak dust features. Although most of our sample are known from optical/UV data to be active star-formers, they lack the expected strong mid-infrared continuum. Star formation may be proceeding in unusually dust-deficient circumgalactic environments such as the interface between the cooling flow and the relativistic jets from the active galactic nucleus.
  • [Abridged] We present high-resolution optical HST/STIS observations made with two slits crossing four of the brightest starburst clumps in the vicinity of the nucleus of M82. These provide H_alpha kinematics, extinction, electron density and emission measures. From the radial velocity curves we confirm the presence of a stellar bar, and find that the super star cluster M82-A1 has a position and radial velocity consistent with it being at the end of one of the unique x2 bar orbits formed by an inner Lindblad resonance. We derive a new model for the orientation of the bar and disc with respect to the main starburst clumps, and propose that clump A has formed within the bar region as a result of gas interactions between the bar orbits, whereas region C lies at the edge of the bar and regions D and E are located further out from the nucleus but heavily obscured. We derive extremely high interstellar densities, corresponding to ISM pressures of P/k ~ 0.5-1.0 x 10^7 cm^-3 K, and discuss the implications of the measured gas properties surrounding the nuclear star clusters on the production and evolution of the galactic wind. Despite varying pressures, the ionization parameter is uniform down to parsec-scales, and we discuss why this might be so. Where the S/N of our spectra are high enough, we identify multiple emission-line components. Through detailed Gaussian line-fitting, we identify a ubiquitous broad (200-300 km/s) underlying component to the bright H_alpha line, and discuss the physical mechanism(s) that could be responsible for such widths. We conclude that the evaporation and/or ablation of material from interstellar gas clouds caused by the impact of the high-energy photons and fast-flowing cluster winds produces a highly turbulent layer on the surface of the clouds from which the emission arises.
  • We study the UV and optical properties of 38 massive GCs in M87, imaged using the HST/STIS and WFPC2 instruments. The majority of these GCs appear extremely bright in the FUV - roughly a magnitude brighter than their Galactic counterparts with similar metallicities. The observed FUV flux is several times larger than predictions of canonical old stellar population models. These canonical models, which assume a fiducial helium enrichment parameter, dY/dZ=2, are able to reproduce the observed FUV fluxes only if ages are 3--5 Gyr larger than the WMAP age of the Universe, although the same models fit the UV photometry of Galactic and M31 GCs for ages less than the WMAP age. A similar discrepancy is found between the mass-weighted and UV-luminosity weighted ages of the massive Galactic GC omega Cen, whose CMD (including peculiar features on its well-populated horizontal branch) can be accurately reproduced by invoking a small super-He-rich (dY/dZ ~ 90) stellar component. By comparison to omega Cen, we propose that the majority of M87 GCs in our sample contain strong signatures of similarly minor super-He-rich sub-components. Although we cannot prove or disprove the extreme helium scenario at the moment, we show that the same phenomenon that causes the extended horizontal branch of omega Cen explains the UV brightness of our sample. If this is indeed due to the extreme helium, this study would be the first to find its signatures in extragalactic objects.
  • We present optical spectroscopy obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) of five young massive star clusters in the starburst galaxy M82. A detailed analysis is performed for one cluster `M82-A1' and its immediate environment in the starburst core. From HST archive images, we find that it is elliptical with an effective radius of 3.0+/-0.5 pc and is surrounded by a compact (r=4.5+/-0.5 pc) H II region. We determine the age and reddening of M82-A1 using synthetic spectra from population synthesis models by fitting both the continuum energy distribution and the depth of the Balmer jump. We find an age of 6.4+/-0.5 Myr and a photometric mass estimate of M=7-13 x 10^5 solar masses. We associate its formation with the most recent starburst event 4-6 Myr ago. We find that the oxygen abundance of the H II region surrounding M82-A1 is solar or slightly higher. The H II region has a high pressure P/k = 1-2 x 10^7 cm^-3 K. The diffuse gas in region A has a slightly lower pressure, which together with the broad H alpha emission line width, suggests that both the thermal and turbulent pressures in the M82 starburst core are unusually high. We discuss how this environment has affected the evolution of the cluster wind for M82-A1. We find that the high pressure may have caused the pressure-driven bubble to stall. We also obtain spectroscopic ages for clusters B1-2 and B2-1 in the `fossil' starburst region and for the intermediate age clusters F and L. These are consistent with earlier studies and demonstrate that star formation activity, sufficiently intense to produce super star clusters, has been going on in M82 during the past Gyr, perhaps in discrete and localized episodes.
  • We have obtained HST/STIS far- and near-UV photometry of globular clusters in four fields in the gE galaxy M87. To a limit of m(FUV) = 25 we detect a total of 66 globular clusters (GCs) in common with the deep HST optical-band study of Kundu et al. (1999). Despite strong overlap in V- and I-band properties, the M87 GCs have UV/optical properties that are distinct from clusters in the Milky Way and in M31. M87 clusters, especially metal-poor ones, produce larger hot HB populations than do Milky Way analogues. Cluster mass is probably not a factor in these distinctions. The most metal-rich M87 GCs in our sample are near Z_sun and overlap the local E galaxy sample in estimated Mg_2 line indices. Nonetheless, the clusters produce much more UV light at a given Mg_2, being up to 1 mag bluer than any gE galaxy in (FUV-V) color. The M87 GCs do not appear to represent a transition between Milky Way-type clusters and E galaxies. The differences are in the correct sense if the clusters are significantly older than the E galaxies. Comparisons with Galactic open clusters indicate that the hot stars lie on the extreme horizontal branch, rather than being blue stragglers, and that the EHB becomes well populated for ages > 5 Gyr. We find that 43 of our UV detections have no optical-band counterparts. Most appear to be UV-bright background galaxies, seen through M87. Eleven NUV variable sources detected at only one epoch in the central field are probably classical novae. [Abridged]
  • Using HST/STIS, we have detected far-ultraviolet nuclear activity in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1399, the central and brightest galaxy in the Fornax I cluster. The source reached a maximum observed far-UV luminosity of \~1.2 x 10e39 ergs/s in January 1999. It was detectable in earlier HST archival images in 1996 (B band) but not in 1991 (V band) or 1993 (UV). It faded by a factor of ~4x by mid-2000. The source is almost certainly associated with the low luminosity AGN responsible for the radio emission in NGC 1399. The properties of the outburst are remarkably similar to the UV-bright nuclear transient discovered earlier in NGC 4552 by Renzini et al. (1995). The source is much fainter than expected from its Bondi accretion rate (estimated from Chandra high resolution X-ray images), even in the context of "radiatively inefficient accretion flow" models, and its variability also appears inconsistent with such models. High spatial resolution UV monitoring is a valuable means to study activity in nearby LLAGNs.
  • We examine star clusters in the irregular, starburst galaxy NGC 1569 from HST images. In addition to the two known super star clusters, we identify 45 other clusters that are compact but resolved. Integrated UVI colors of the clusters span a large range, and suggest that ages range from 3 Myrs to 1 Gyr. However, most of the clusters were formed at the tail end of the recent starburst. Numerous clusters in addition to the know super star clusters are similar in luminosity to a small globular cluster. We examined the radial surface brightness of four of the clusters. Their half-light radii and core radii are in the range observed in present-day globular clusters. Therefore, conditions that produced the recent starburst have also been those necessary for producing compact, bright star clusters. We examine resolved stars in the outer parts of the two super star clusters. Cluster A is dominated by bright blue stars with a small population of red supergiants. Sub-components A1 and A2 have similar colors and a two-dimensional color map does not offer evidence that one component is dominated by red supergiants and the other not. The contradiction of the presence of red super- giants with Wolf-Rayet stars may instead not be a contradiction at all since there coexistence in a coeval population is not inconsistent with the evolution of massive stars. Cluster B is dominated by red supergiants, and this is confirmed by the presence of the stellar CO absorption feature in an integrated spectrum. The various age indicators are consistent with a picture in which cluster B is of order 10--20 Myrs old, and cluster A is >4-5 Myrs old.
  • We have undertaken an imaging survey of 34 nearby galaxies in far-ultraviolet (FUV, ~1500A) and optical (UBVRI) passbands to characterize galaxy morphology as a function of wavelength. This sample, which includes a range of classical Hubble types from elliptical to irregular with emphasis on spirals at low inclination angle, provides a valuable database for comparison with images of high-z galaxies whose FUV light is redshifted into the optical and near- infrared bands. Ultraviolet data are from the UIT Astro-2 mission. We present images and surface brightness profiles for each galaxy, and we discuss the wavelength-dependence of morphology for different Hubble types in the context of understanding high-z objects. In general, the dominance of young stars in the FUV produces the patchy appearance of a morphological type later than that inferred from optical images. Prominent rings and circumnuclear star formation regions are clearly evident in FUV images of spirals, while bulges, bars, and old, red stellar disks are faint to invisible at these short wavelengths. However, the magnitude of the change in apparent morphology ranges from dramatic in early--type spirals with prominent optical bulges to slight in late-type spirals and irregulars, in which young stars dominate both the UV and optical emission. Starburst galaxies with centrally concentrated, symmetric bursts display an apparent ``E/S0'' structure in the FUV, while starbursts associated with rings or mergers produce a peculiar morphology. We briefly discuss the inadequacy of the optically-defined Hubble sequence to describe FUV galaxy images and estimate morphological k-corrections, and we suggest some directions for future research with this dataset.
  • Far-UV (FUV), H-alpha, and HI observations of dwarf galaxy Holmberg II are used to trace the interaction between sites of massive star formation and the neutral and ionized components of the surrounding ISM. The data emphasize the importance of local conditions in regulating star formation from evidence such as massive stars inside ionized shells, compact HII regions surrounding aging clusters, and stars formed in chains of progressing age. Large-scale triggering by HI shells is supported by observations of progenitor populations as well as secondary sites of star formation associated with their dense rims. Analysis of the energy available from massive stars inside HI shells indicates energy deposited into the ISM from supernovae and stellar winds is sufficient to account for the HI morphology. Ages of individual star forming regions are derived using B, H-alpha, and FUV photometry. The distribution of ages is reconciled with the HI morphology, showing a clear preference of young regions for areas of dense HI and old regions for HI voids. Global kinematical properties may also play a role in the star formation process since differences in the rotation characteristics of the neutral gas disk correlate with differences in triggering mechanisms.
  • We discuss far-UV (1500 A) surface photometry and FUV-B color profiles for 8 E/S0 galaxies from images taken with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, primarily during the Astro-2 mission. In three cases, the FUV radial profiles are more consistent with an exponential than a de Vaucouleurs function, but there is no other evidence for the presence of a disk or of young, massive stars. In all cases except M32 the FUV-B color becomes redder at larger radii. There is a wide range of internal radial FUV-B color gradients. However, we find no correlation between the FUV-B color gradients and internal metallicity gradients based on Mg absorption features. We conclude that metallicity is not the sole parameter controlling the "UV upturn component" in old populations.