• The observed rotation curves of disc galaxies, ranging from late-type dwarf galaxies to early-type spirals, can be fit remarkably well simply by scaling up the contributions of the stellar and HI discs. This `baryonic scaling model' can explain the full breadth of observed rotation curves with only two free parameters. For a small fraction of galaxies, in particular early-type spiral galaxies, HI scaling appears to fail in the outer parts, possibly due to observational effects or ionization of the HI. The overall success of the baryonic scaling model suggests that the well-known global coupling between the baryonic mass of a galaxy and its rotation velocity (known as the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation), applies at a more local level as well, and it seems to imply a link between the baryonic mass distribution and the distribution of total mass (including dark matter).
  • Mass models for a sample of 18 late-type dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies show that in almost all cases the contribution of the stellar disks to the rotation curves can be scaled to explain most of the observed rotation curves out to two or three disk scale lengths. The concept of a maximum disk, therefore, appears to work as well for these late-type dwarf galaxies as it does for spiral galaxies. Some of the mass-to-light ratios required in our maximum disk fits are high, however, up to about 15 in the R-band, with the highest values occurring in galaxies with the lowest surface brightnesses. Equally well-fitting mass models can be obtained with much lower mass-to-light ratios. Regardless of the actual contribution of the stellar disk, the fact that the maximum disk can explain the inner parts of the observed rotation curves highlights the similarity in shapes of the rotation curve of the stellar disk and the observed rotation curve. This similarity implies that the distribution of the total mass density is closely coupled to that of the luminous mass density in the inner parts of late-type dwarf galaxies.
  • The NOAO NEWFIRM Pipeline produces instrumentally calibrated data products and data quality measurements from all exposures taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) at the KPNO Mayall 4-meter telescope. We describe the distributed nature of the NEWFIRM Pipeline, the calibration data that are applied, the data quality metadata that are derived, and the data products that are delivered by the NEWFIRM Pipeline.
  • We present rotation curves derived for a sample of 62 late-type dwarf galaxies that have been observed as part of the Westerbork HI Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies (WHISP) project. The rotation curves were derived by interactively fitting model data cubes to the observed cubes, taking rotation curve shape, HI distribution, inclination, and the size of the beam into account. This makes it possible to correct for the effects of beam smearing. The dwarf galaxies in our sample have rotation-curve shapes that are similar to those of late-type spiral galaxies, in the sense that their rotation curves, when expressed in units of disk scale lengths, rise as steeply in the inner parts and start to flatten at two disk scale lengths. None of the galaxies in our sample have solid-body rotation curves that extend beyond three scale lengths. The logarithmic outer rotation curve slopes are similar between late-type dwarf and spiral galaxies. Thus, whether the flat part of the rotation curve is reached seems to depend more on the extent of the rotation curve than on its amplitude. We also find that the outer rotation curve shape does not strongly depend on luminosity, at least for galaxies fainter than M_R~-19. We find that in spiral galaxies and in the central regions of late-type dwarf galaxies, the shape of the central distribution of light and the inner rise of the rotation curve are related. This implies that galaxies with stronger central concentrations of light also have higher central mass densities, and it suggests that the luminous mass dominates the gravitational potential in the central regions, even in low surface brightness dwarf galaxies.
  • Systematic effects on HI and Halpha long-slit observations make a measurement of the inner slope of the dark matter density distribution difficult to determine. Halos with constant density cores and ones with r^-1 profiles both appear consistent with the data, although constant density cores generally provide better fits. High-resolution, two-dimensional velocity fields remove most of the systematic effects, yet as a result of noncircular and random motions the inner slopes still cannot be accurately measured. Halo concentration parameters provide a more useful test of cosmological models because they are more tightly constrained by observations. The concentration parameters for LSB galaxies appear consistent with, but on the low end of the distribution predicted by CDM.
  • We present the first measurement of the stellar kinematics in the polar ring of NGC 4650A. There is well defined rotation, with the stars and gas rotating in the same direction, and with similar amplitude. The gaseous and stellar kinematics suggest an approximately flat rotation curve, providing further support for the hypothesis that the polar material resides in a disk rather than in a ring. The kinematics of the emission line gas at and near the center of the S0 suggests that the polar disk lacks a central hole. We have not detected evidence for two, equal mass, counterrotating stellar polar streams, as is predicted in the resonance levitation model proposed by Tremaine & Yu. A merger seems the most likely explanation for the structure and kinematics of NGC 4650A.
  • We present Halpha rotation curves for a sample of 15 dwarf and LSB galaxies. From these, we derive limits on the slopes of the central mass distributions. Assuming the density distributions of dark matter halos follow a power-law at small radii, rho(r)~r^(-alpha), we find inner slopes in the range 0<alpha<1 for most galaxies. In general, halos with constant density cores (\alpha=0) provide somewhat better fits, but the majority of our galaxies (~75%) are also consistent with alpha=1, provided that the R-band mass-to-light ratios are smaller than about 2. Halos with alpha=1.5, however, are ruled out in virtually every case. To investigate the robustness of these results we discuss and model several possible causes of systematic errors including non-circular motions, slit width, seeing, and slit alignment errors. Taking the associated uncertainties into account, we conclude that even for the 25% of the cases where alpha=1 seems inconsistent with the rotation curves, we cannot rule out cusp slopes this steep. Inclusion of literature samples similar to the one presented here leads to the same conclusion when possible systematic errors are taken into account. In the ongoing debate on whether the rotation curves of dwarf and LSB galaxies are consistent with predictions for a CDM universe, we argue that our sample and the literature samples discussed in this paper provide insufficient evidence to rule out halos with alpha=1. At the same time, we note that none of the galaxies in these samples require halos with steep cusps, as most are equally well or better explained by constant density cores. (abridged)
  • Neutral hydrogen observations with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope are presented for a sample of 73 late-type dwarf galaxies. These observations are part of the WHISP project (Westerbork HI Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies). Here we present HI maps, velocity fields, global profiles and radial surface density profiles of HI, as well as HI masses, HI radii and line widths. For the late-type galaxies in our sample, we find that the ratio of HI extent to optical diameter, defined as 6.4 disk scale lengths, is on average 1.8+-0.8, similar to that seen in spiral galaxies. Most of the dwarf galaxies in this sample are rich in HI, with a typical M_HI/L_B of 1.5. The relative HI content M_HI/L_R increases towards fainter absolute magnitudes and towards fainter surface brightnesses. Dwarf galaxies with lower average HI column densities also have lower average optical surface brightnesses. We find that lopsidedness is as common among dwarf galaxies as it is in spiral galaxies. About half of the dwarf galaxies in our sample have asymmetric global profiles, a third has a lopsided HI distribution, and about half shows signs of kinematic lopsidedness.
  • R-band surface photometry is presented for 171 late-type dwarf and irregular galaxies. For a subsample of 46 galaxies B-band photometry is presented as well. We present surface brightness profiles as well as isophotal and photometric parameters including magnitudes, diameters and central surface brightnesses. Absolute photometry is accurate to 0.1 mag or better for 77% of the sample. For over 85% of the galaxies the radial surface brightness profiles are consistent with published data within the measured photometric uncertainty. For most of the galaxies in the sample HI data have been obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The galaxies in our sample are part of the WHISP project (Westerbork HI Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies), which aims at mapping about 500 nearby spiral and irregular galaxies in HI. The availability of HI data makes this data set useful for a wide range of studies of the structure, dark matter content and kinematics of late-type dwarf galaxies.
  • We present first-season infrared (IR) and optical photometry and spectroscopy of the Type Ia Supernova 1998bu in M96. We also report optical polarimetry of this event. SN1998bu is one of the closest type Ia Supernovae of modern times and the distance of its host galaxy is well-determined. We find that SN1998bu is both photometrically and spectroscopically normal. However, the extinction to this event is unusually high, with Av=1.0 +/-0.11. We find that SN1998bu peaked at an intrinsic Mv=-19.37 +/-0.23. Adopting a distance modulus of 30.25 (Tanvir et al. 1999) and using Phillips et al.'s (1999) relations for the Hubble constant we obtain Ho=70.4 +/-4.3 km/s/Mpc. Combination of our IR photometry with those of Jha et al. (1999) provides one of the most complete early-phase IR light curves for a SN Ia published so far. In particular, SN 1998bu is the first normal SN Ia for which good pre-maximum (in the B band) IR coverage has been obtained. It reveals that the J, H and K light curves peak about 5 days earlier than the flux in the B-band curve.
  • The neutral hydrogen line profiles along the major axis of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2403 show a wing towards the sytemic velocity. This asymmetry can be explained with the presence of an abnormally thick HI disk (FWHM ~ 5 kpc) or with a two-component structure: a thin disk and a slowly rotating, thicker (1-3 kpc) HI layer. The latter model gives a better representation of the observations. These results throw a new light on the disk-halo connection. In particular, the decrease of rotational velocity with height above the plane may be the result of a galactic fountain flow. A vertically extended, slowly rotating HI layer may be common among spiral galaxies with high levels of star formation.
  • High resolution Halpha rotation curves are presented for five low surface brightness galaxies. These Halpha rotation curves have shapes different from those previously derived from HI observations, probably because of the higher spatial resolution of the Halpha observations. The Halpha rotation curves rise more steeply in the inner parts than the HI rotation curves and reach a flat part beyond about two disk scale lengths. With radii expressed in optical disk scale lengths, the rotation curves of the low surface brightness galaxies presented here and those of HSB galaxies have almost identical shapes. Mass modeling shows that the contribution of the stellar component to the rotation curves may be scaled to explain most of the inner parts of the rotation curves, albeit with high stellar mass-to-light ratios. On the other hand, well fitting mass models can also be obtained with lower contributions of the stellar disk. These observations suggest that the luminous mass density and the total mass density are coupled in the inner parts of these galaxies.
  • Asymmetries in the distribution of light and neutral hydrogen are often observed in spiral galaxies. Here, attention is drawn to the presence of large-scale asymmetries in their kinematics. Two examples of kinematically lopsided galaxies are presented and discussed. The shape of the rotation curve --rising more steeply on one side of the galaxy than on the other-- is the signature of the kinematic lopsidedness. It is shown that kinematic lopsidedness may be related to lopsidedness in the potential, and that even a mild perturbation in the latter can produce significant kinematical effects. Probably at least half of all spiral galaxies are lopsided.
  • Neutral hydrogen observations of the nearby, edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891 reveal the presence of an HI halo extending up to at least 5 kpc from the plane. This halo gas appears to rotate 25 to 100 km/s more slowly than the gas in the plane. If this velocity difference is due to the gradient in the gravitational potential, then it may serve to discriminate between disk and spheroidal mass models. The classic picture of a large outer flare in the HI layer of NGC 891 may no longer be valid. A correlation is seen between the distributions of HI, Halpha and radio continuum emission, which supports, in accordance with galactic fountain models, the picture of a substantial disk-halo circulation related to the star formation activity in the disk of NGC 891. There is now also clear evidence for the presence of a rapidly rotating (v_rot ~ 230 km/s) disk or ring of HI in the central part of NGC 891.