• Context: The mass-metallicity relationship (MMR) of star-forming galaxies is well-established, however there is still some disagreement with respect to its exact shape and its possible dependence on other observables. Aims: We measure the MMR in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. We compare our measured MMR to that measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and study the dependence of the MMR on various selection criteria to identify potential causes for disparities seen in the literature. Methods: We use strong emission line ratio diagnostics to derive oxygen abundances. We then apply a range of selection criteria for the minimum signal-to-noise in various emission lines, as well as the apparent and absolute magnitude to study variations in the inferred MMR. Results: The shape and position of the MMR can differ significantly depending on the metallicity calibration and selection used. After selecting a robust metallicity calibration amongst those tested, we find that the mass-metallicity relation for redshifts 0.061< z<0.35 in GAMA is in reasonable agreement with that found in the SDSS despite the difference in the luminosity range probed. Conclusions: In view of the significant variations of the MMR brought about by reasonable changes in the sample selection criteria and method, we recommend that care be taken when comparing the MMR from different surveys and studies directly. We also conclude that there could be a modest level of evolution over 0.06<z<0.35 within the GAMA sample.
  • We investigate the properties of satellite galaxies that surround isolated hosts within the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.15, using data taken as part of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey. Making use of isolation and satellite criteria that take into account stellar mass estimates, we find 3514 isolated galaxies of which 1426 host a total of 2998 satellites. Separating the red and blue populations of satellites and hosts, using colour-mass diagrams, we investigate the radial distribution of satellite galaxies and determine how the red fraction of satellites varies as a function of satellite mass, host mass and the projected distance from their host. Comparing the red fraction of satellites to a control sample of small neighbours at greater projected radii, we show that the increase in red fraction is primarily a function of host mass. The satellite red fraction is about 0.2 higher than the control sample for hosts with 11.0 < log M_* < 11.5, while the red fractions show no difference for hosts with 10.0 < log M_* < 10.5. For the satellites of more massive hosts the red fraction also increases as a function of decreasing projected distance. Our results suggest that the likely main mechanism for the quenching of star formation in satellites hosted by isolated galaxies is strangulation.
  • Using the complete GAMA-I survey covering ~142 sq. deg. to r=19.4, of which ~47 sq. deg. is to r=19.8, we create the GAMA-I galaxy group catalogue (G3Cv1), generated using a friends-of-friends (FoF) based grouping algorithm. Our algorithm has been tested extensively on one family of mock GAMA lightcones, constructed from Lambda-CDM N-body simulations populated with semi-analytic galaxies. Recovered group properties are robust to the effects of interlopers and are median unbiased in the most important respects. G3Cv1 contains 14,388 galaxy groups (with multiplicity >= 2$), including 44,186 galaxies out of a possible 110,192 galaxies, implying ~40% of all galaxies are assigned to a group. The similarities of the mock group catalogues and G3Cv1 are multiple: global characteristics are in general well recovered. However, we do find a noticeable deficit in the number of high multiplicity groups in GAMA compared to the mocks. Additionally, despite exceptionally good local spatial completeness, G3Cv1 contains significantly fewer compact groups with 5 or more members, this effect becoming most evident for high multiplicity systems. These two differences are most likely due to limitations in the physics included of the current GAMA lightcone mock. Further studies using a variety of galaxy formation models are required to confirm their exact origin.
  • We present an analysis of the properties of the lowest Halpha-luminosity galaxies (L_Halpha<4x10^32 W; SFR<0.02 Msun/yr) in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These galaxies make up the the rise above a Schechter function in the number density of systems seen at the faint end of the Halpha luminosity function. Above our flux limit we find that these galaxies are principally composed of intrinsically low stellar mass systems (median stellar mass =2.5x10^8 Msun) with only 5/90 having stellar masses M>10^10 Msun. The low SFR systems are found to exist predominantly in the lowest density environments (median density ~0.02 galaxy Mpc^-2 with none in environments more dense than ~1.5 galaxy Mpc^-2). Their current specific star formation rates (SSFR; -8.5 < log(SSFR[yr^-1])<-12.) are consistent with their having had a variety of star formation histories. The low density environments of these galaxies demonstrates that such low-mass, star-forming systems can only remain as low-mass and forming stars if they reside sufficiently far from other galaxies to avoid being accreted, dispersed through tidal effects or having their gas reservoirs rendered ineffective through external processes.
  • We present 3D spectroscopic observations of a sample of 10 nearby galaxies with the AAOmega-SPIRAL integral field spectrograph on the 3.9m AAT, the largest survey of its kind to date. The double-beam spectrograph provides spatial maps in a range of spectral diagnostics: [OIII] 5007, H-beta, Mg-b, NaD, [OI] 6300, H-alpha, [NII] 6583, [SII] 6717, 6731. All of the objects in our survey show extensive wind-driven filamentation along the minor axis, in addition to large-scale disk rotation. Our sample can be divided into either starburst galaxies or active galactic nuclei (AGN), although some objects appear to be a combination of these. The total ionizing photon budget available to both classes of galaxies is sufficient to ionise all of the wind-blown filamentation out to large radius. We find however that while AGN photoionisation always dominates in the wind filaments, this is not the case in starburst galaxies where shock ionisation dominates. This clearly indicates that after the onset of star formation, there is a substantial delay (> 10 Myr) before a starburst wind develops. We show why this behavior is expected by deriving ``ionisation'' and dynamical timescales for both AGNs and starbursts. We establish a sequence of events that lead to the onset of a galactic wind. The clear signature provided by the ionisation timescale is arguably the strongest evidence yet that the starburst phenomenon is an impulsive event. A well-defined ionisation timescale is not expected in galaxies with a protracted history of circumnuclear star formation. Our 3D data provide important templates for comparisons with high redshift galaxies.[Abridged]
  • A heuristic greedy algorithm is developed for efficiently tiling spatially dense redshift surveys. In its first application to the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) redshift survey we find it rapidly improves the spatial uniformity of our data, and naturally corrects for any spatial bias introduced by the 2dF multi object spectrograph. We make conservative predictions for the final state of the GAMA redshift survey after our final allocation of time, and can be confident that even if worse than typical weather affects our observations, all of our main survey requirements will be met.
  • We present the results of a photometric and spectroscopic study of the white dwarf candidate members of the intermediate age open clusters NGC3532 and NGC2287. Of the nine objects investigated, it is determined that six are probable members of the clusters, four in NGC3532 and two in NGC2287. For these six white dwarfs we use our estimates of their cooling times together with the cluster ages to constrain the lifetimes and masses of their progenitor stars. We examine the location of these objects in initial mass-final mass space and find that they now provide no evidence for substantial scatter in initial mass-final mass relation as suggested by previous investigations. Instead, we demonstrate that, when combined with current data from other solar metalicity open clusters and the Sirius binary system, they hint at an IFMR that is steeper in the initial mass range 3M$_{\odot}$$\simless$M$_{\rm init}$$\simless$4M$_{\odot}$ than at progenitor masses immediately lower and higher than this. This form is generally consistent with the predictions of stellar evolutionary models and can aid population synthesis models in reproducing the relatively sharp drop observed at the high mass end of the main peak in the mass distribution of white dwarfs.
  • We report on the AAT-AAOmega LRG Pilot observing run to establish the feasibility of a large spectroscopic survey using the new AAOmega instrument. We have selected Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) using single epoch SDSS riz-photometry to i<20.5 and z<20.2. We have observed in 3 fields including the COSMOS field and the COMBO-17 S11 field, obtaining a sample of ~600 redshift z>=0.5 LRGs. Exposure times varied from 1 - 4 hours to determine the minimum exposure for AAOmega to make an essentially complete LRG redshift survey in average conditions. We show that LRG redshifts to i<20.5 can measured in approximately 1.5hr exposures and present comparisons with 2SLAQ and COMBO-17 (photo-)redshifts. Crucially, the riz selection coupled with the 3-4 times improved AAOmega throughput is shown to extend the LRG mean redshift from z=0.55 for 2SLAQ to z=0.681+/- 0.005 for riz-selected LRGs. This extended range is vital for maximising the S/N for the detection of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs). Furthermore, we show that the amplitude of LRG clustering is s_0 = 9.9+/-0.7 h^-1 Mpc, as high as that seen in the 2SLAQ LRG Survey. Consistent results for the real-space amplitude are found from projected and semi-projected correlation functions. This high clustering amplitude is consistent with a long-lived population whose bias evolves as predicted by a simple ``high-peaks'' model. We conclude that a redshift survey of 360 000 LRGs over 3000deg^2, with an effective volume some 4 times bigger than previously used to detect BAO with LRGs, is possible with AAOmega in 170 nights.
  • Using the SCUBA bolometer array on the JCMT, we have carried out a submillimetre survey of Broad Absorption Line quasars (BALQs). The sample has been chosen to match, in redshift and optical luminosity, an existing benchmark 850um sample of radio-quiet quasars, allowing a direct comparison of the submm properties of BAL quasars relative to the parent radio-quiet population. We reach a submm limit 1.5mJy at 850um, allowing a more rigorous measure of the submm properties of BAL quasars than previous studies. Our submm photometry complements extensive observations at other wavelengths, in particular X-rays with Chandra and mid-infrared with Spitzer. To compare the 850um flux distribution of BALQs with that of the non-BAL quasar benchmark sample, we employ a suite of statistical methods, including survival analysis and a novel Bayesian derivation of the underlying flux distribution. Although there are no strong grounds for rejecting the null hypothesis that BALQs on the whole have the same submm properties as non-BAL quasars, we do find tentative evidence (1-4 percent significance from a K-S test and survival analysis) for a dependence of submm flux on the equivalent width of the characteristic CIV broad absorption line. If this effect is real - submm activity is linked to the absorption strength of the outflow - it has implications either for the evolution of AGN and their connection with star formation in their host galaxies, or for unification models of AGN.
  • We report high resolution (R~37,000) integral field spectroscopy of the central region (r<14arcsec) of the Red Rectangle nebula surrounding HD44179. The observations focus on the 5800A emission feature, the bluest of the yellow/red emission bands in the Red Rectangle. We propose that the emission feature, widely believed to be a molecular emission band, is not a molecular rotation contour, but a vibrational contour caused by overlapping sequence bands from a molecule with an extended chromophore. We model the feature as arising in a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) with 45-100 carbon atoms.
  • We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • The ongoing quest to identify molecules in the interstellar medium by their electronic spectra in the visible region is reviewed. Identification of molecular absorption is described in the context of the elucidation of the carriers of the unidentified diffuse interstellar bands while molecular emission is discussed with reference to the unidentified Red Rectangle bands. The experimental techniques employed in undertaking studies on the optical spectroscopy of extraterrestrial molecules are described and critiqued in the context of their application.
  • We present the results of a multi-colour (VIZ) survey for low luminosity (M_B<-23.5) quasars with z~5 using the 12K CCD mosaic camera on CFHT. The survey covers 1.8deg^2 to a limiting magnitude of m_z=22.5(Vega), about two magnitudes fainter than the SDSS quasar survey. 20 candidates were selected by their VIZ colours and spectra for 15 of these were obtained with GMOS on the Gemini North telescope. A single quasar with z=4.99 was recovered, the remaining candidates are all M stars. The detection of only a single quasar in the redshift range accessible to the survey (4.8<5.2) is indicative of a possible turn over in the luminosity function at faint quasar magnitudes, and a departure from the form observed at higher luminosities (in agreement with quasar lensing observations by Richards etal (2003)). However, the derived space densitys, of quasars more luminous than M_B(Vega)<-23.5, of 2.96x10^-7 Mpc^-3 is consistent at the 65% confidence level with extrapolation of the quasar luminosity function as derived by Fan etal (2001a) at m_i<19.6(Vega).
  • We present preliminary results from a set of near-IR integral field spectroscopic observations of the central, star-burst, regions of the barred spiral galaxy M83, obtained with CIRPASS on Gemini-S. We present maps in the Paschen-Beta and [FeII]1.257um emission lines which appear surprisingly different. We outline the procedure in which we will use Paschen-Beta emission line strengths and measures of CO absorption to determine the relative and absolute ages of individual star-forming knots in the central kpc region of M83.
  • We combine deep, wide-field near-IR and optical imaging to demonstrate a reddening-independent quasar selection technique based on identifying outliers in the (g-z) / (z-H) colour diagram. In three fields covering a total of ~0.7 deg^2 to a depth of m_H~18, we identified 68 quasar candidates. Follow-up spectroscopy for 32 objects from this candidate list confirmed 22 quasars (0.86<z<2.66), five with significant IR excesses. 2 of 8 quasars from a subsample with U band observations do not exhibit UVX colours. From these preliminary results, we suggest that this combined optical and near-IR selection technique has a high selection efficiency (> 65% success rate), a high surface density of candidates, and is relatively independent of reddening. We discuss the implications for star/galaxy separation for IR based surveys for quasars. We provide the coordinate list and follow-up spectroscopy for the sample of 22 confirmed quasars.
  • We report the first results of an observational program designed to determine the luminosity density of high redshift quasars (z > 5 quasars) using deep multi-colour CCD data. We report the discovery and spectra of 3 i < 21.5 high redshift (z > 4.4) quasars, including one with z > 5. At z=5.17, this is the fourth highest redshift quasar currently published. Using these preliminary results we derive an estimate of the M \rm_B < - 25.0 (M \rm_{AB1450} < - 24.5) quasar space density in the redshift range 4.8 < z < 5.8 of 3.6 \pm2.5\times 10^{-8} \Mpc ^{-3} . When completed the survey will provide a firm constraint on the contribution to the ionizing UV background in the redshift range 4.5 - 5.5 from quasars by determining the faint end slope of the quasar luminosity function. The survey uses imaging data taken with the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope as part of the Public Isaac Newton Group Wide Field Survey (WFS). This initial sample of objects is taken from two fields of effective area $\sim 12.5deg ^2$ from the final $\sim 100deg ^2$.
  • We present preliminary results from a wide field near-IR imaging survey that uses the Cambridge InfraRed Survey Instrument (CIRSI) on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). CIRSI is a JH-band mosaic imager that contains 4 Rockwell 1024$^{2}$ HgCdTe detectors (the largest IR camera in existence), allowing us to survey approximately 4 deg^2 per night to H ~ 19. Combining CIRSI observations with the deep optical imaging from the INT Wide Field Survey, we demonstrate a reddening independent quasar selection technique based on the (g - z) / (z - H) color diagram.
  • The 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope(INT) is currently being used to carry out a major multi-colour, multi-epoch, CCD based wide field survey over an area of 100 square degrees. The survey parameters have been chosen to maximise scientific return over a wide range of scientific areas and to complement other surveys being carried out elsewhere. Unique aspects of the survey is that it concentrates on regions of sky that are easily accessible from telescopes in both Northern and Southern terrestrial hemispheres and that it the first public survey to use filters similar to that being used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A major aim of the the INT Wide Field Survey program is to bridge the gap between the all-sky photographic 2 and 3 band surveys such as the Palomar and UK Schmidt sky surveys and the ultra-deep keyhole surveys such as the Hubble Deep Field.