• We investigate the interplay between gap oscillations and damping in the dynamics of superconductors taken out of equilibrium by strong optical pulses with sub-gap Terahertz frequencies. A semi-phenomenological formalism is developed to include the damping within the electronic subsystem that arises from effects beyond BCS, such as interactions between Bogoliubov quasiparticles and decay of the Higgs mode. Such processes are conveniently expressed as $T_{1}$ and $T_{2}$ times in the standard pseudospin language for superconductors. Comparing with data on NbN that we report here, we argue that the superconducting dynamics in the picosecond time scale, after the pump is turned off, is governed by the $T_{2}$ process.
  • Recent experiments in iron pnictide superconductors reveal that, as the putative magnetic quantum critical point is approached, different types of magnetic order coexist over a narrow region of the phase diagram. Although these magnetic configurations share the same wave-vectors, they break distinct symmetries of the lattice. Importantly, the highest superconducting transition temperature takes place close to this proliferation of near-degenerate magnetic states. In this paper, we employ a renormalization group calculation to show that such a behavior naturally arises due to the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the quantum magnetic fluctuations. Formally, the enhanced magnetic degeneracy near the quantum critical point is manifested as a stable Gaussian fixed point with a large basin of attraction. Implications of our findings to the superconductivity of the iron pnictides are also discussed.
  • We investigate the impact of spin anisotropic interactions, promoted by spin-orbit coupling, on the magnetic phase diagram of the iron-based superconductors. Three distinct magnetic phases with Bragg peaks at $(\pi,0)$ and $(0,\pi)$ are possible in these systems: one $C_2$ (i.e. orthorhombic) symmetric stripe magnetic phase and two $C_4$ (i.e. tetragonal) symmetric magnetic phases. While the spin anisotropic interactions allow the magnetic moments to point in any direction in the $C_2$ phase, they restrict the possible moment orientations in the $C_4$ phases. As a result, an interesting scenario arises in which the spin anisotropic interactions favor a $C_2$ phase, but the other spin isotropic interactions favor a $C_4$ phase. We study this frustration via both mean-field and renormalization-group approaches. We find that, to lift this frustration, a rich magnetic landscape emerges well below the magnetic transition temperature, with novel $C_2$, $C_4$, and mixed $C_2$-$C_4$ phases. Near the putative magnetic quantum critical point, spin anisotropies promote a stable Gaussian fixed point in the renormalization-group flow, which is absent in the spin isotropic case, and is associated with a near-degeneracy between $C_2$ and $C_4$ phases. We argue that this frustration is the reason why most $C_4$ phases in the iron pnictides only appear inside the $C_2$ phase, and discuss additional manifestations of this frustration in the phase diagrams of these materials.
  • We show that the antiferromagnetic state commonly observed in the phase diagrams of the iron-based superconductors necessarily triggers loop currents characterized by charge transfer between different Fe $ 3d $ orbitals. This effect is rooted on the glide-plane symmetry of these materials and on the existence of an atomic spin-orbit coupling that couples states at the $X$ and $Y$ points of the 1-Fe Brillouin zone. In the particular case in which the magnetic moments are aligned parallel to the magnetic ordering vector direction which is the moment configuration most commonly found in the iron-based superconductors these loop currents involve the $d_{xy}$ orbital and either the $d_{yz}$ orbital (if the moments point along the $y$ axis) or the $d_{xz}$ orbitals (if the moments point along the $x$ axis). We show that the two main manifestations of the orbital loop currents are the emergence of magnetic moments in the pnictide/chalcogen site and an orbital-selective band splitting in the magnetically ordered state, both of which could be detected experimentally. Our results highlight the unique intertwining between orbital and spin degrees of freedom in the iron-based superconductors, and reveal the emergence of an unusual correlated phase that may impact the normal state and superconducting properties of these materials.
  • Magnetism induced by external pressure ($p$) was studied in a FeSe crystal sample by means of muon-spin rotation. The magnetic transition changes from second-order to first-order for pressures exceeding the critical value $p_{{\rm c}}\simeq2.4-2.5$ GPa. The magnetic ordering temperature ($T_{{\rm N}}$) and the value of the magnetic moment per Fe site ($m_{{\rm Fe}}$) increase continuously with increasing pressure, reaching $T_{{\rm N}}\simeq50$~K and $m_{{\rm Fe}}\simeq0.25$ $\mu_{{\rm B}}$ at $p\simeq2.6$ GPa, respectively. No pronounced features at both $T_{{\rm N}}(p)$ and $m_{{\rm Fe}}(p)$ are detected at $p\simeq p_{{\rm c}}$, thus suggesting that the stripe-type magnetic order in FeSe remains unchanged above and below the critical pressure $p_{{\rm c}}$. A phenomenological model for the $(p,T)$ phase diagram of FeSe reveals that these observations are consistent with a scenario where the nematic transitions of FeSe at low and high pressures are driven by different mechanisms.
  • Multi-band superconductivity is realized in a plethora of systems, from high-temperature superconductors to very diluted superconductors. While several properties of multi-band superconductors can be understood as straightforward generalizations of their single-band counterparts, recent works have unveiled rather unusual behaviors unique to the former case. In this regard, a regime that has received significant attention is that near a Lifshitz transition, in which one of the bands crosses the Fermi level. In this work, we investigate how impurity scattering $\tau^{-1}$ affects the superconducting transition temperature $T_{c}$ across a Lifshitz transition, in the regime where intra-band pairing is dominant and inter-band pairing is subleading. This is accomplished by deriving analytic asymptotic expressions for $T_{c}$ and $\partial T_{c}/\partial\tau^{-1}$ in a two-dimensional two-band system. When the inter-band pairing interaction is repulsive, we find that, despite the incipient nature of the band crossing the Fermi level, inter-band impurity scattering is extremely effective in breaking Cooper pairs, making $\partial T_{c}/\partial\tau^{-1}$ quickly approach the limiting Abrikosov-Gor'kov value of the high-density regime. In contrast, when the inter-band pairing interaction is attractive, pair-breaking is much less efficient, affecting $T_{c}$ only mildly at the vicinity of the Lifshitz transition. The consequence of this general result is that the behavior of $T_{c}$ across a Lifshitz transition can be qualitatively changed in the presence of strong enough disorder: instead of displaying a sharp increase across the Lifshitz transition, as in the clean case, $T_{c}$ can actually display a maximum and be suppressed at the Lifshitz transition. These results shed new light on the non-trivial role of impurity scattering in multi-band superconductors.
  • A hallmark of the phase diagrams of quantum materials is the existence of multiple electronic ordered states, which, in many cases, are not independent competing phases, but instead display a complex intertwinement. In this review, we focus on a particular realization of intertwined orders: a primary phase characterized by a multi-component order parameter and a fluctuation-driven vestigial phase characterized by a composite order parameter. This concept has been widely employed to elucidate nematicity in iron-based and cuprate superconductors. Here we present a group-theoretical framework that extends this notion to a variety of phases, providing a classification of vestigial orders of unconventional superconductors and density-waves. Electronic states with scalar and vector chiral order, spin-nematic order, Ising-nematic order, time-reversal symmetry-breaking order, and algebraic vestigial order emerge from one underlying principle. The formalism provides a framework to understand the complexity of quantum materials based on symmetry, largely without resorting to microscopic models.
  • Although discovered many decades ago, superconductivity in doped SrTiO$_{3}$ remains a topic of intense research. Recent experiments revealed that, upon increasing the carrier concentration, multiple bands cross the Fermi level, signaling the onset of Lifshitz transitions. Interestingly, $T_{c}$ was observed to be suppressed across the Lifshitz transition of oxygen-defficient SrTiO$_{3}$; a similar behavior was also observed in gated LaAlO$_{3}$/SrTiO$_{3}$ interfaces. Such a behavior is difficult to explain in the standard theory of two-band superconductivity, as the additional electronic states provided by the second band should enhance $T_{c}$. Here, we show that this unexpected behavior can be explained by the strong pair-breaking effect promoted by disorder, which takes place if the inter-band pairing interaction is subleading and repulsive. A consequence of this scenario is that, upon moving away from the Lifshitz transition, the two-band superconducting state changes from opposite-sign gaps to same-sign gaps, which has strong implications for the thermodynamic properties of the system.
  • Muon spin rotation and relaxation studies have been performed on a "111" family of iron-based superconductors NaFe_1-xNi_xAs. Static magnetic order was characterized by obtaining the temperature and doping dependences of the local ordered magnetic moment size and the volume fraction of the magnetically ordered regions. For x = 0 and 0.4 %, a transition to a nearly-homogeneous long range magnetically ordered state is observed, while for higher x than 0.4 % magnetic order becomes more disordered and is completely suppressed for x = 1.5 %. The magnetic volume fraction continuously decreases with increasing x. The combination of magnetic and superconducting volumes implies that a spatially-overlapping coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity spans a large region of the T-x phase diagram for NaFe_1-xNi_xAs . A strong reduction of both the ordered moment size and the volume fraction is observed below the superconducting T_C for x = 0.6, 1.0, and 1.3 %, in contrast to other iron pnictides in which one of these two parameters exhibits a reduction below TC, but not both. The suppression of magnetic order is further enhanced with increased Ni doping, leading to a reentrant non-magnetic state below T_C for x = 1.3 %. The reentrant behavior indicates an interplay between antiferromagnetism and superconductivity involving competition for the same electrons. These observations are consistent with the sign-changing s-wave superconducting state, which is expected to appear on the verge of microscopic coexistence and phase separation with magnetism. We also present a universal linear relationship between the local ordered moment size and the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature TN across a variety of iron-based superconductors. We argue that this linear relationship is consistent with an itinerant-electron approach, in which Fermi surface nesting drives antiferromagnetic ordering.
  • Bulk FeSe is a special iron-based material in which superconductivity emerges inside a well-developed nematic phase. We present a microscopic model for this nematic superconducting state, which takes into account the mixing between $s-$wave and $d-$wave pairing channels and the changes in the orbital spectral weight promoted by the sign-changing nematic order parameter. We show that nematicity gives rise to a $\cos2\theta$ variation of the pairing gap on the hole pocket that agrees with ARPES and STM data for experimentally-extracted Fermi surface parameters. We further argue that, in BCS theory, $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals give nearly equal contributions to the pairing glue, i.e. nematic order alone accounts for the gap anisotropy, but has little effect on $T_{c}$. This result questions the validity of the concept of orbital-selective pairing. Self-energy corrections, however, make $d_{xz}$ orbital more incoherent and reduce its contribution to pairing.
  • The concept of a vestigial nematic order emerging from a "mother" spin or charge density-wave state has been applied to describe the phase diagrams of several systems, including unconventional superconductors. In a perfectly clean system, the two orders appear simultaneously via a first-order quantum phase transition, implying the absence of quantum criticality. Here, we investigate how this behavior is affected by impurity-free droplets that are naturally present in inhomogeneous systems. Due to their quantum dynamics, finite-size droplets sustain long-range nematic order but not long-range density-wave order. Interestingly, rare droplets with moderately large sizes undergo a second-order nematic transition even before the first-order quantum transition of the clean system. This gives rise to an extended regime of inhomogeneous nematic order, which is followed by a density-wave quantum Griffiths phase. As a result, a smeared quantum nematic transition, separated from the density-wave quantum transition, emerges in moderately disordered systems.
  • Ultrafast perturbations offer a unique tool to manipulate correlated systems due to their ability to promote transient behaviors with no equilibrium counterpart. A widely employed strategy is the excitation of coherent optical phonons, as they can cause significant changes in the electronic structure and interactions on short time scales. Here, we explore a promising alternative route: the non-equilibrium excitation of acoustic phonons. We demonstrate that it leads to the remarkable phenomenon of a momentum-dependent temperature, by which electronic states at different regions of the Fermi surface are subject to distinct local temperatures. Such an anisotropic electronic temperature can have a profound effect on the delicate balance between competing ordered states in unconventional superconductors, opening a novel avenue to control correlated phases.
  • We investigate the interplay between charge order and superconductivity near an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point using sign-problem-free Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We establish that, when the electronic dispersion is particle-hole symmetric, the system has an emergent SU(2) symmetry that implies a degeneracy between $d$-wave superconductivity and charge order with $d$-wave form factor. Deviations from particle-hole symmetry, however, rapidly lift this degeneracy, despite the fact that the SU(2) symmetry is preserved at low energies. As a result, we find a strong suppression of charge order caused by the competing, leading superconducting instability. Across the antiferromagnetic phase transition, we also observe a shift in the charge order wave-vector from diagonal to axial. We discuss the implications of our results to the universal phase diagram of antiferromagnetic quantum-critical metals and to the elucidation of the charge order experimentally observed in the cuprates.
  • An instrumentation problem with the signal acquisition at high frequencies was discovered and we no longer believe that the experimental data presented in the manuscript, showing a frequency enhancement of the elastoresistivity, are correct. After correcting the problem, the elastoresistivity data is frequency independent in the range investigated. Therefore, the authors have withdrawn this submission. We would like to thank Alex Hristov, Johanna Palmstrom, Josh Straquadine and Ian Fisher (Stanford) for the kind discussions and assistance we received which helped us identify these problems.
  • In several unconventional superconductors, the highest superconducting transition temperature $T_{c}$ is found in a region of the phase diagram where the antiferromagnetic transition temperature extrapolates to zero, signaling a putative quantum critical point. The elucidation of the interplay between these two phenomena - high-$T_{c}$ superconductivity and magnetic quantum criticality - remains an important piece of the complex puzzle of unconventional superconductivity. In this paper, we combine sign-problem-free Quantum Monte Carlo simulations and field-theoretical analytical calculations to unveil the microscopic mechanism responsible for the superconducting instability of a general low-energy model, called spin-fermion model. In this approach, low-energy electronic states interact with each other via the exchange of quantum critical magnetic fluctuations. We find that even in the regime of moderately strong interactions, both the superconducting transition temperature and the pairing susceptibility are governed not by the properties of the entire Fermi surface, but instead by the properties of small portions of the Fermi surface called hot spots. Moreover, $T_{c}$ increases with increasing interaction strength, until it starts to saturate at the crossover from hot-spots dominated to Fermi-surface dominated pairing. Our work provides not only invaluable insights into the system parameters that most strongly affect $T_{c}$, but also important benchmarks to assess the origin of superconductivity in both microscopic models and actual materials.
  • The close interplay between superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in several quantum materials can lead to the appearance of an unusual thermodynamic state in which both orders coexist microscopically, despite their competing nature. A hallmark of this coexistence state is the emergence of a spin-triplet superconducting gap component, called $\pi$-triplet, which is spatially modulated by the antiferromagnetic wave-vector, reminiscent of a pair-density wave. In this paper, we investigate the impact of these $\pi$-triplet degrees of freedom on the phase diagram of a system with competing antiferromagnetic and superconducting orders. Although we focus on a microscopic two-band model that has been widely employed in studies of iron pnictides, most of our results follow from a Ginzburg-Landau analysis, and as such should be applicable to other systems of interest, such as cuprates and heavy fermions. The Ginzburg-Landau functional reveals not only that the $\pi$-triplet gap amplitude couples tri-linearly with the singlet gap amplitude and the staggered magnetization magnitude, but also that the $\pi$-triplet $d$-vector couples linearly with the magnetization direction. While in the mean field level this coupling forces the $d$-vector to align parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetization, in the fluctuation regime it promotes two additional collective modes - a Goldstone mode related to the precession of the $d$-vector around the magnetization and a massive mode, related to the relative angle between the two vectors, which is nearly degenerate with a Leggett-like mode associated with the phase difference between the singlet and triplet gaps. We also investigate the impact of magnetic fluctuations on the superconducting-antiferromagnetic phase diagram, showing that due to their coupling with the $\pi$-triplet order parameter, the coexistence region is enhanced.
  • The paradigmatic example of a continuous quantum phase transition is the transverse field Ising ferromagnet. In contrast to classical critical systems, whose properties depend only on symmetry and the dimension of space, the nature of a quantum phase transition also depends on the dynamics. In the transverse field Ising model, the order parameter is not conserved and increasing the transverse field enhances quantum fluctuations until they become strong enough to restore the symmetry of the ground state. Ising pseudo-spins can represent the order parameter of any system with a two-fold degenerate broken-symmetry phase, including electronic nematic order associated with spontaneous point-group symmetry breaking. Here, we show for the representative example of orbital-nematic ordering of a non-Kramers doublet that an orthogonal strain or a perpendicular magnetic field plays the role of the transverse field, thereby providing a practical route for tuning appropriate materials to a quantum critical point. While the transverse fields are conjugate to seemingly unrelated order parameters, their non-trivial commutation relations with the nematic order parameter, which can be represented by a Berry-phase term in an effective field theory, intrinsically intertwines the different order parameters.
  • Motivated by the widespread experimental observations of nematicity in strongly underdoped cuprate superconductors, we investigate the possibility of enhanced nematic fluctuations in the vicinity of a Mott insulator that displays N\'eel-type antiferromagnetic order. By performing a strong-coupling expansion of an effective model that contains both Cu-$d$ and O-$p$ orbitals on the square lattice, we demonstrate that quadrupolar fluctuations in the $p$-orbitals inevitably generate a biquadratic coupling between the spins of the $d$-orbitals. The key point revealed by our classical Monte Carlo simulations and large-$N$ calculations is that the biquadratic term favors local stripe-like magnetic fluctuations, which result in an enhanced nematic susceptibility that onsets at a temperature scale determined by the effective Heisenberg exchange $J$. We discuss the impact of this type of nematic order on the magnetic spectrum and outline possible implications on our understanding of nematicity in the cuprates.
  • We use polarized inelastic neutron scattering to study the temperature and energy dependence of spin space anisotropies in the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide Ba$_{0.67}$K$_{0.33}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ ($T_{{\rm c}}=38$ K). In the superconducting state, while the high-energy part of the magnetic spectrum is nearly isotropic, the low-energy part displays a pronouced anisotropy, manifested by a $c$-axis polarized resonance. We also observe that the spin anisotropy in superconducting Ba$_{0.67}$K$_{0.33}$Fe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ extends to higher energies compared to electron-doped BaFe$_{2-x}TM_{x}$As$_{2}$ ($TM=$Co, Ni) and isovalent-doped BaFe$_{2}$As$_{1.4}$P$_{0.6}$, suggesting a connection between $T_{\rm c}$ and the energy scale of the spin anisotropy. In the normal state, the low-energy spin anisotropy for optimally hole- and electron-doped iron pnictides onset at temperatures similar to the temperatures at which the elastoresistance deviate from Curie-Weiss behavior, pointing to a possible connection between the two phenomena. Our results highlight the relevance of the spin-orbit coupling to the superconductivity of the iron pnictides.
  • The origin of the high-temperature superconducting state observed in FeSe thin films, whose phase diagram displays no sign of magnetic order, remains a hotly debated topic. Here we investigate whether fluctuations arising due to the proximity to a nematic phase, which is observed in the phase diagram of this material, can promote superconductivity. We find that nematic fluctuations alone promote a highly degenerate pairing state, in which both $s$-wave and $d$-wave symmetries are equally favored, and $T_{c}$ is consequently suppressed. However, the presence of a sizable spin-orbit coupling or inversion symmetry-breaking at the film interface lifts this harmful degeneracy and selects the $s$-wave state, in agreement with recent experimental proposals. The resulting gap function displays a weak anisotropy, which agrees with experiments in monolayer FeSe and intercalated Li$_{1-x}$(OH)$_{x}$FeSe.
  • Several experimental and theoretical arguments have been made in favor of a $d-$wave symmetry for the superconducting state in some Fe-based materials. It is a common belief that a $d-$wave gap in the Fe-based superconductors must have nodes on the Fermi surfaces centered at the $\Gamma$ point of the Brillouin zone. Here we show that, while this is the case for a single Fermi surface made out of a single orbital, the situation is more complex if there is an even number of Fermi surfaces made out of different orbitals. In particular, we show that for the two $\Gamma$-centered hole Fermi surfaces made out of $d_{xz}$ and $d_{yz}$ orbitals, the nodal points still exist near $T_{c}$ along the symmetry-imposed directions, but are are displaced to momenta between the two Fermi surfaces. If the two hole pockets are close enough, pairs of nodal points can merge and annihilate at some $T<T_{c}$, making the $d-$wave state completely nodeless. These results imply that photoemission evidence for a nodeless gap on the $d_{xz}/d_{yz}$ Fermi surfaces of KFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$ does not rule out $d-$wave gap symmetry in this material, while a nodeless gap observed on the $d_{xy}$ pocket in K$_{x}$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_{2}$ is truly inconsistent with the $d-$wave gap symmetry.
  • The combination of electronic correlations and Fermi surfaces with multiple nesting vectors can lead to the appearance of complex multi-Q magnetic ground states, hosting unusual states such as chiral density-waves and quantum Hall insulators. Distinguishing single-Q and multi-Q magnetic phases is however a notoriously difficult experimental problem. Here we propose theoretically that the local density of states near a magnetic impurity, whose orientation may be controlled by an external magnetic field, can be used to map out the detailed magnetic configuration of an itinerant system and distinguish unambiguously between single-Q and multi-Q phases. We demonstrate this concept by computing and contrasting the LDOS near a magnetic impurity embedded in three different magnetic ground states relevant to iron-based superconductors -- one single-Q and two double-Q phases. Our results open a promising avenue to investigate complex magnetic configurations in itinerant systems via standard scanning tunneling spectroscopy, without requiring spin-resolved capability.
  • The development of sensible microscopic models is essential to elucidate the normal-state and superconducting properties of the iron-based superconductors. Because these materials are mostly metallic, a good starting point is an effective low-energy model that captures the electronic states near the Fermi level and their interactions. However, in contrast to cuprates, iron-based high-$T_{c}$ compounds are multi-orbital systems with Hubbard and Hund interactions, resulting in a rather involved 10-orbital lattice model. Here we review different minimal models that have been proposed to unveil the universal features of these systems. We first review minimal models defined solely in the orbital basis, which focus on a particular subspace of orbitals, or solely in the band basis, which rely only on the geometry of the Fermi surface. The former, while providing important qualitative insight into the role of the orbital degrees of freedom, do not distinguish between high-energy and low-energy sectors and, for this reason, generally do not go beyond mean-field. The latter allow one to go beyond mean-field and investigate the interplay between superconducting and magnetic orders as well as Ising-nematic order. However, they cannot capture orbital-dependent features like spontaneous orbital order. We then review recent proposals for a minimal model that operates in the band basis but fully incorporates the orbital composition and symmetries of the low-energy excitations. We discuss the results of the renormalization group study of such a model, particularly of the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and spontaneous orbital order, and compare theoretical predictions with experiments on iron pnictides and chalcogenides. We also discuss the impact of the glide-plane symmetry on the low-energy models, highlighting the key role played by the spin-orbit coupling.
  • Stimulated by experimental advances in electrolyte gating methods, we investigate theoretically percolation in thin films of inhomogenous complex oxides, such as La$_{1-x}$Sr$_{x}$CoO$_{3}$ (LSCO), induced by a combination of bulk chemical and surface electrostatic doping. Using numerical and analytical methods, we identify two mechanisms that describe how bulk dopants reduce the amount of electrostatic surface charge required to reach percolation: (i) bulk-assisted surface percolation, and (ii) surface-assisted bulk percolation. We show that the critical surface charge strongly depends on the film thickness when the film is close to the chemical percolation threshold. In particular, thin films can be driven across the percolation transition by modest surface charge densities \emph{via} surface-assisted bulk percolation. If percolation is associated with the onset of ferromagnetism, as in LSCO, we further demonstrate that the presence of critical magnetic clusters extending from the film surface into the bulk results in considerable volume enhancement of the saturation magnetization, with pronounced experimental consequences. These results should significantly guide experimental work seeking to verify gate-induced percolation transitions in such materials.
  • Magnetism and nematic order are the two non-superconducting orders observed in iron-based superconductors. To elucidate the interplay between them and ultimately unveil the pairing mechanism, several models have been investigated. In models with quenched orbital degrees of freedom, magnetic fluctuations promote stripe magnetism which induces orbital order. In models with quenched spin degrees of freedom, charge fluctuations promote spontaneous orbital order which induces stripe magnetism. Here we develop an unbiased approach, in which we treat magnetic and orbital fluctuations on equal footing. Key to our approach is the inclusion of the orbital character of the low-energy electronic states into renormalization group analysis. Our results show that in systems with large Fermi energies, such as BaFe2As2, LaFeAsO, and NaFeAs, orbital order is induced by stripe magnetism. However, in systems with small Fermi energies, such as FeSe, the system develops a spontaneous orbital order, while magnetic order does not develop. Our results provide a unifying description of different iron-based materials.