• General spacetime nonmetricity coupled to neutrons is studied. In this context, it is shown that certain nonmetricity components can generate a rotation of the neutron's spin. Available data on this effect obtained from slow-neutron propagation in liquid helium are used to constrain isotropic nonmetricity components at the level of $10^{-22}\,$GeV. These results represent the first limit on the nonmetricity $\zeta^{(6)}_2S_{000}$ parameter as well as the first measurement of nonmetricity inside matter.
  • Various approaches to physics beyond the Standard Model can lead to small violations of CPT invariance. Since CPT symmetry can be measured with ultrahigh precision, CPT tests offer an interesting phenomenological avenue to search for underlying physics. We discuss this reasoning in more detail, comment on the connection between CPT and Lorentz invariance, and review how CPT breaking would affect the (anti)hydrogen spectrum.
  • Lorentz and CPT invariance are among the symmetries that can be investigated with ultrahigh precision in subatomic physics. Being spacetime symmetries, Lorentz and CPT invariance can be violated by minuscule amounts in many theoretical approaches to underlying physics that involve novel spacetime concepts, such as quantized versions of gravity. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, the low-energy effects of such violations are expected to be governed by effective field theory. This talk provides a survey of this idea and includes an overview of experimental efforts in the field.
  • We report the first experimental upper bound to our knowledge on possible in-matter torsion interactions of the neutron from a recent search for parity violation in neutron spin rotation in liquid He-4. Our experiment constrains a coefficient $\zeta$ consisting of a linear combination of parameters involving the time components of the torsion fields $T^\mu$ and $A^\mu$ from the nucleons and electrons in helium which violates parity. We report an upper bound of $|\zeta|<9.1x10^{-23}$ GeV at 68% confidence level and indicate other physical processes that could be analyzed to constrain in-matter torsion.
  • The classical propagation of certain Lorentz-violating fermions is known to be governed by geodesics of a four-dimensional pseudo-Finsler $b$ space parametrized by a prescribed background covector field. This work identifies systems in classical physics that are governed by the three-dimensional version of Finsler $b$ space and constructs a geodesic for a sample non-constant choice for the background covector. The existence of these classical analogues demonstrates that Finsler $b$ spaces possess applications in conventional physics, which may yield insight into the propagation of SME fermions on curved manifolds.
  • Radiative corrections in quantum field theories with small departures from Lorentz symmetry alter structural aspects of the theory, in particular the definition of asymptotic single-particle states. Specifically, the mass-shell condition, the standard renormalization procedure as well as the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formalism are affected.
  • Perturbative calculations in quantum field theory often require the regularization of infrared divergences. In quantum electrodynamics, such a regularization can for example be accomplished by a photon mass introduced via the Stueckelberg method. The present work extends this method to the QED limit of the Lorentz- and CPT-violating Standard-Model Extension.
  • Asymptotic single-particle states in quantum field theories with small departures from Lorentz symmetry are investigated perturbatively with focus on potential phenomenological ramifications. To this end, one-loop radiative corrections for a sample Lorentz-violating Lagrangian contained in the Standard-Model Extension (SME) are studied at linear order in Lorentz breakdown. It is found that the spinor kinetic operator, and thus the free-particle physics, is modified by Lorentz-violating operators absent from the original Lagrangian. As a consequence of this result, both the standard renormalization procedure as well as the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formalism need to be adapted. The necessary adaptations are worked out explicitly at first order in Lorentz-breaking coefficients.
  • An important open question in fundamental physics concerns the nature of spacetime at distance scales associated with the Planck length. The widespread belief that probing such distances necessitates Planck-energy particles has impeded phenomenological and experimental research in this context. However, it has been realized that various theoretical approaches to underlying physics can accommodate Planck-scale violations of spacetime symmetries. This talk surveys the motivations for spacetime-symmetry research, the SME test framework, and experimental efforts in this field.
  • We prove the existence of Veech groups having a critical exponent strictly greater than any elementary Fuchsian group (i.e. $>\frac{1}{2}$) but strictly smaller than any lattice (i.e. $<1$). More precisely, every affine covering of a primitive L-shaped Veech surface $X$ ramified over the singularity and a non-periodic connection point $P\in X$ has such a Veech group. Hubert and Schmidt showed that these Veech groups are infinitely generated and of the first kind. We use a result of Roblin and Tapie which connects the critical exponent of the Veech group of the covering with the Cheeger constant of the Schreier graph of $\mathrm{SL}(X)/\mathrm{Stab}_{\mathrm{SL}(X)}(P)$. The main task is to show that the Cheeger constant is strictly positive, i.e. the graph is non-amenable. In this context, we introduce a measure of the complexity of connection points that helps to simplify the graph to a forest for which non-amenability can be seen easily.
  • Violations of Lorentz symmetry are typically associated with modifications of one-particle dispersion relations. The physical effects of such modifications in particle collisions often grow with energy, so that ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays provide an excellent laboratory for measuring such effects. In this talk we argue that collisions at particle colliders, which involve much smaller energies, can nevertheless yield competitive constraints on Lorentz breaking.
  • In some quantum theories of gravity, deviations from the laws of relativity could be comparatively large while escaping detection to date. In the neutrino sector, precision experiments with beta decay yield new and improved constraints on these countershaded relativity violations. Existing data are used to extract bounds of $3 \times 10^{-8}$ GeV on the magnitudes of two of the four possible coefficients, and estimates are provided of future attainable sensitivities in a variety of experiments.
  • All quadratic translation- and gauge-invariant photon operators for Lorentz breakdown are included into the Stueckelberg Lagrangian for massive photons in a generalized \xi-gauge. The corresponding dispersion relation and tree-level propagator are determined exactly, and some leading-order results are derived. The question of how to include such Lorentz-violating effects into a perturbative quantum-field expansion is addressed. Applications of these results within Lorentz-breaking quantum field theories include the regularization of infrared divergences as well as the free propagation of massive vector bosons.
  • One of the most difficult questions in present-day physics concerns a fundamental theory of space, time, and matter that incorporates a consistent quantum description of gravity. There are various theoretical approaches to such a quantum-gravity theory. Nevertheless, experimental progress is hampered in this research field because many models predict deviations from established physics that are suppressed by some power of the Planck scale, which currently appears to be immeasurably small. However, tests of relativity theory provide one promising avenue to overcome this phenomenological obstacle: many models for underlying physics can accommodate a small breakdown of Lorentz symmetry, and numerous feasible Lorentz-symmetry tests have Planck reach. Such mild violations of Einstein's relativity have therefore become a focus of recent research efforts. This presentation provides a brief survey of the key ideas in this research field and is geared at both experimentalists and theorists. In particular, several theoretical mechanisms leading to deviations from relativity theory are presented; the standard theoretical framework for relativity violations at currently accessible energy scales (i.e., the SME) is reviewed, and various present and near-future experimental efforts within this field are discussed.
  • The Chern-Simons-type term in the photon sector of the Lorentz- and CPT-breaking minimal Standard-Model Extension (mSME) is considered. It is argued that under certain circumstances this term can be removed from the mSME. In particular, it is demonstrated that for lightlike Lorentz violation a field redefinition exists that maps the on-shell free Chern-Simons model to conventional on-shell free electrodynamics. A compact explicit expression for an operator implementing such a mapping is constructed. This expression establishes that the field redefinition is non-local.
  • Some motivations for Lorentz-symmetry tests in the context of quantum-gravity phenomenology are reiterated. The description of the emergent low-energy effects with the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is reviewed. The possibility of constraining such effects with dispersion-relation analyses of collider data is established.
  • Aug. 10, 2010 hep-ph
    A number of approaches to fundamental physics can lead to the violation of Lorentz and CPT symmetry. This talk discusses the low-energy phenomenology associated with such effects and reviews various sample experiments within this context.
  • The effect of the higher-energy 2nd resonance and the associated adiabatic-to-nonadiabatic transition on neutrino propagation in solar matter is presented. For WIMP-annihilation neutrinos injected with energies in the "sweet region" between 300 MeV and 10 GeV at the Sun's center, a significant and revealing dependence on the neutrino mass hierarchy and the mixing angle theta_13 down to 0.5 degrees is found in the flavor ratios arriving at Earth. In addition, the amplification of flavor ratios in the sweet region allows a better discrimination among possible annihilation modes of the solar dark matter. Under mild assumptions on WIMP properties, it is estimated that 200 neutrino events in the sweet region would be required for inferences of theta_13, the mass hierarchy, and the dominant WIMP annihilation mode. Future large-volume, low-energy neutrino detectors are likely needed if the measurement is to be made.
  • The largest gap in our understanding of nature at the fundamental level is perhaps a unified description of gravity and quantum theory. Although there are currently a variety of theoretical approaches to this question, experimental research in this field is inhibited by the expected Planck-scale suppression of quantum-gravity effects. However, the breakdown of spacetime symmetries has recently been identified as a promising signal in this context: a number of models for underlying physics can accommodate minuscule Lorentz and CPT violation, and such effects are amenable to ultrahigh-precision tests. This presentation will give an overview of the subject. Topics such as motivations, the SME test framework, mechanisms for relativity breakdown, and experimental tests will be reviewed. Emphasis is given to observations involving antimatter.
  • We consider the possibility that Lorentz violation can generate differences between the limiting velocities of light and charged matter. Such effects would lead to efficient vacuum Cherenkov radiation or rapid photon decay. The absence of such effects for 104.5 GeV electrons at the Large Electron Positron collider and for 300 GeV photons at the Tevatron therefore constrains this type of Lorentz breakdown. Within the context of the standard-model extension, these ideas imply an experimental bound at the level of -5.8 x 10^{-12} <= \tilde{\kappa}_{tr}-(4/3)c_e^{00} <= 1.2 x 10^{-11} tightening existing laboratory measurements by 3-4 orders of magnitude. Prospects for further improvements with terrestrial and astrophysical methods are discussed.
  • In recent years, the breakdown of spacetime symmetries has been identified as a promising research field in the context of Planck-scale phenomenology. For example, various theoretical approaches to the quantum-gravity problem are known to accommodate minute violations of CPT invariance. This talk covers various topics within this research area. In particular, some mechanisms for spacetime-symmetry breaking as well as the Standard-Model Extension (SME) test framework will be reviewed; the connection between CPT and Lorentz invariance in quantum field theory will be exposed; and various experimental CPT tests with emphasis on matter--antimatter comparisons will be discussed.
  • The absence of vacuum Cherenkov radiation for 104.5 GeV electrons and positrons at LEP combined with the observed stability of 300 GeV photons at the Tevatron constrains deviations of the speed of light relative to the maximal attainable speed of electrons. Within the Standard-Model Extension (SME), the limit $-5.8\times10^{-12} \leq \tilde{\kappa}_{\rm tr}-{4/3}c_e^{00} \leq 1.2\times10^{-11}$ is extracted, which sharpens previous bounds by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The potential for further refinements of this limit with terrestrial experiments and astrophysical observations is discussed.
  • The Lorentz- and CPT-violating Chern-Simons extension of electrodynamics is considered. In the context of N=4 supergravity in four spacetime dimensions, it is argued that cosmological solutions can generate this extension. Within Chern-Simons electrodynamics, theoretical and phenomenological topics are reviewed that concern the number of the remaining spacetime symmetries and the vacuum Cherenkov effect, respectively.
  • We consider the neutrino (and antineutrino) flavors arriving at Earth for neutrinos produced in the annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the Sun's core. Solar-matter effects on the flavor propagation of the resulting $\agt$ GeV neutrinos are studied analytically within a density-matrix formalism. Matter effects, including mass-state level-crossings, influence the flavor fluxes considerably. The exposition herein is somewhat pedagogical, in that it starts with adiabatic evolution of single flavors from the Sun's center, with $\theta_{13}$ set to zero, and progresses to fully realistic processing of the flavor ratios expected in WIMP decay, from the Sun's core to the Earth. In the fully realistic calculation, non-adiabatic level-crossing is included, as are possible nonzero values for $\theta_{13}$ and the CP-violating phase $\delta$. Due to resonance enhancement in matter, nonzero values of $\theta_{13}$ even smaller than a degree can noticeably affect flavor propagation. Both normal and inverted neutrino-mass hierarchies are considered. Our main conclusion is that measuring flavor ratios (in addition to energy spectra) of $\agt$ GeV solar neutrinos can provide discrinination between WIMP models. In particular, we demonstrate the flavor differences at Earth for neutrinos from the two main classes of WIMP final states, namely $W^+ W^-$ and 95% $b \bar{b}$ + 5% $\tau^+\tau^-$. Conversely, if WIMP properties were to be learned from production in future accelerators, then the flavor ratios of $\agt$ GeV solar neutrinos might be useful for inferring $\theta_{13}$ and the mass hierarchy.
  • Violations of spacetime symmetries have recently been identified as promising signatures for physics underlying the Standard Model. The present talk gives an overview over various topics in this field: The motivations for spacetime-symmetry research, including some mechanisms for Lorentz breaking, are reviewed. An effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) for the description of the resulting low-energy effects is introduced, and some experimental tests of Lorentz and CPT invariance are listed.