• We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • Simultaneous observations at four different frequencies viz. 313, 607, 1380 and 4850 MHz, for three pulsars, PSRs B0031-07, B0809+74 and B2319+60, are reported in this paper. Identified null and burst pulses are highly concurrent across more than decade of frequency. Small fraction of non-concurrent pulses (less than or equal to 3%) are observed, most of which occur at the transition instances. We report, with very high significance for the first time, full broadband nature of the nulling phenomenon in these three pulsars. These results suggest that nulling invokes changes on the global magnetospheric scale.
  • We report on the setup and initial discoveries of the Northern High Time Resolution Universe survey for pulsars and fast transients, the first major pulsar survey conducted with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope and the first in 20 years to observe the whole northern sky at high radio frequencies. Using a newly developed 7-beam receiver system combined with a state-of-the-art polyphase filterbank, we record an effective bandwidth of 240 MHz in 410 channels centred on 1.36 GHz with a time resolution of 54 $\mu$s. Such fine time and frequency resolution increases our sensitivity to millisecond pulsars and fast transients, especially deep inside the Galaxy, where previous surveys have been limited due to intra-channel dispersive smearing. To optimise observing time, the survey is split into three integration regimes dependent on Galactic latitude, with 1500-s, 180-s and 90-s integrations for latitude ranges $|b|<3.5^{\circ}$, $|b|<15^{\circ}$ and $|b|>15^{\circ}$, respectively. The survey has so far resulted in the discovery of 15 radio pulsars, including a pulsar with a characteristic age of $\sim18$ kyr, {PSR J2004+3429}, and a highly eccentric, binary millisecond pulsar, {PSR J1946+3417}. All newly discovered pulsars are timed using the 76-m Lovell radio telescope at the Jodrell Bank Observatory and the Effelsberg radio telescope. We present timing solutions for all newly discovered pulsars and discuss potential supernova remnant associations for {PSR J2004+3429}.
  • The low frequency (110--180 MHz) capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) are used to characterise a large collection of single pulses from three low magnetic field pulsars. Using the Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) to acquire and coherently dedisperse the pulsar signals, we examine whether the bright pulses observed in these pulsars are related to the classical giant pulse emission. Giant pulses are reported from PSR B1112$+$50 and bright pulses from the PSRs B1133$+$16 and B0031$-$07. These pulsars also exhibit large intensity modulations observed as rapid changes in the single pulse intensity. Evidence of global magnetospheric effects is provided by our detection of bright double pulses in PSRs B0031$-$07 and B1133$+$16. Using the multi-frequency observations, we accurately determine the dispersion measures (4.844$\pm$0.002 for B1133$+$16 and 9.1750$\pm$0.0001 for B1112$+$50), derive the radio emission height in PSR B1133$+$16 and report on the properties of subpulse drift modes in these pulsars. We also find that these pulsars show a much larger intensity modulation at low sky frequencies resulting in narrow and bright emissions.
  • The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa II) is the new flexible pulsar processing backend system at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), specifically designed to take advantage of the upgraded WSRT. The instrument is based on a computer cluster running the Linux operating system, with minimal custom hardware. A maximum of 160 MHz analogue bandwidth sampled as 8X20 MHz subbands with 8-bit resolution can be recorded on disks attached to separate computer nodes. Processing of the data is done in the additional 32-nodes allowing near real time coherent dedispersion for most pulsars observed at the WSRT. This has doubled the bandwidth for pulsar observations in general, and has enabled the use of coherent dedispersion over a bandwidth eight times larger than was previously possible at the WSRT. PuMa II is one of the widest bandwidth coherent dedispersion machines currently in use and has a maximum time resolution of 50ns. The system is now routinely used for high precision pulsar timing studies, polarization studies, single pulse work and a variety of other observational work.