• Weak lensing peak counts are a powerful statistical tool for constraining cosmological parameters. So far, this method has been applied only to surveys with relatively small areas, up to several hundred square degrees. As future surveys will provide weak lensing datasets with size of thousands of square degrees, the demand on the theoretical prediction of the peak statistics will become heightened. In particular, large simulations of increased cosmological volume are required. In this work, we investigate the possibility of using simulations generated with the fast Comoving-Lagrangian acceleration (COLA) method, coupled to the convergence map generator Ufalcon, for predicting the peak counts. We examine the systematics introduced by the COLA method by comparing it with a full TreePM code. We find that for a 2000 deg$^2$ survey, the systematic error is much smaller than the statistical error. This suggests that the COLA method is able to generate promising theoretical predictions for weak lensing peaks. We also examine the constraining power of various configurations of data vectors, exploring the influence of splitting the sample into tomographic bins and combining different smoothing scales. We find the combination of smoothing scales to have the most constraining power, improving the constraints on the $S_8$ amplitude parameter by at least 40% compared to a single smoothing scale, with tomography brining only limited increase in measurement precision.
  • Dark matter in the universe evolves through gravity to form a complex network of halos, filaments, sheets and voids, that is known as the cosmic web. Computational models of the underlying physical processes, such as classical N-body simulations, are extremely resource intensive, as they track the action of gravity in an expanding universe using billions of particles as tracers of the cosmic matter distribution. Therefore, upcoming cosmology experiments will face a computational bottleneck that may limit the exploitation of their full scientific potential. To address this challenge, we demonstrate the application of a machine learning technique called Generative Adversarial Networks (GAN) to learn models that can efficiently generate new, physically realistic realizations of the cosmic web. Our training set is a small, representative sample of 2D image snapshots from N-body simulations of size 500 and 100 Mpc. We show that the GAN-produced results are qualitatively and quantitatively very similar to the originals. Generation of a new cosmic web realization with a GAN takes a fraction of a second, compared to the many hours needed by the N-body technique. We anticipate that GANs will therefore play an important role in providing extremely fast and precise simulations of cosmic web in the era of large cosmological surveys, such as Euclid and LSST.
  • Upcoming weak lensing surveys will probe large fractions of the sky with unprecedented accuracy. To infer cosmological constraints, a large ensemble of survey simulations are required to accurately model cosmological observables and their covariances. We develop a parallelized multi-lens-plane pipeline called UFalcon, designed to generate full-sky weak lensing maps from lightcones within a minimal runtime. It makes use of L-PICOLA, an approximate numerical code, which provides a fast and accurate alternative to cosmological $N$-Body simulations. The UFalcon maps are constructed by nesting 2 simulations covering a redshift-range from $z=0.1$ to $1.5$ without replicating the simulation volume. We compute the convergence and projected overdensity maps for L-PICOLA in the lightcone or snapshot mode. The generation of such a map, including the L-PICOLA simulation, takes about 3 hours walltime on 220 cores. We use the maps to calculate the spherical harmonic power spectra, which we compare to theoretical predictions and to UFalcon results generated using the full $N$-Body code GADGET-2. We then compute the covariance matrix of the full-sky spherical harmonic power spectra using 150 UFalcon maps based on L-PICOLA in lightcone mode. We consider the PDF, the higher-order moments and the variance of the smoothed field variance to quantify the accuracy of the covariance matrix, which we find to be a few percent for scales $\ell \sim 10^2$ to $10^3$. We test the impact of this level of accuracy on cosmological constraints using an optimistic survey configuration, and find that the final results are robust to this level of uncertainty. The speed and accuracy of our developed pipeline provides a basis to also include further important features such as masking, varying noise and will allow us to compute covariance matrices for models beyond $\Lambda$CDM. [abridged]
  • We demonstrate the potential of Deep Learning methods for measurements of cosmological parameters from density fields, focusing on the extraction of non-Gaussian information. We consider weak lensing mass maps as our dataset. We aim for our method to be able to distinguish between five models, which were chosen to lie along the $\sigma_8$ - $\Omega_m$ degeneracy, and have nearly the same two-point statistics. We design and implement a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (DCNN) which learns the relation between five cosmological models and the mass maps they generate. We develop a new training strategy which ensures the good performance of the network for high levels of noise. We compare the performance of this approach to commonly used non-Gaussian statistics, namely the skewness and kurtosis of the convergence maps. We find that our implementation of DCNN outperforms the skewness and kurtosis statistics, especially for high noise levels. The network maintains the mean discrimination efficiency greater than $85\%$ even for noise levels corresponding to ground based lensing observations, while the other statistics perform worse in this setting, achieving efficiency less than $70\%$. This demonstrates the ability of CNN-based methods to efficiently break the $\sigma_8$ - $\Omega_m$ degeneracy with weak lensing mass maps alone. We discuss the potential of this method to be applied to the analysis of real weak lensing data and other datasets.