• We study the dynamics of discrete-time quantum walk using quantum coin operations, $\hat{C}(\theta_1)$ and $\hat{C}(\theta_2)$ in time-dependent periodic sequence. For the two-period quantum walk with the parameters $\theta_1$ and $\theta_2$ in the coin operations we show that the standard deviation [$\sigma_{\theta_1, \theta_2} (t)$] is the same as the minimum of standard deviation obtained from one of the one-period quantum walks with coin operations $\theta_1$ or $\theta_2$, $\sigma_{\theta_1, \theta_2}(t) = \min \{\sigma_{\theta_1}(t), \sigma_{\theta_2}(t) \}$. Our numerical result is analytically corroborated using the dispersion relation obtained from the continuum limit of the dynamics. Using the dispersion relation for one- and two-period quantum walks, we present the bounds on the dynamics of three- and higher period quantum walks. We also show that the bounds for the two-period quantum walk will hold good for the split-step quantum walk which is also defined using two coin operators using $\theta_1$ and $\theta_2$. Unlike the previous known connection of discrete-time quantum walks with the massless Dirac equation where coin parameter $\theta=0$, here we show the recovery of the massless Dirac equation with non-zero $\theta$ parameters contributing to the intriguing interference in the dynamics in a totally non-relativistic situation. We also present the effect of periodic sequence on the entanglement between coin and position space.
  • We experimentally simulate the spin networks -- a fundamental description of quantum spacetime at the Planck level. We achieve this by simulating quantum tetrahedra and their interactions. The tensor product of these quantum tetrahedra comprises spin networks. In this initial attempt to study quantum spacetime by quantum information processing, on a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we simulate the basic module -- comprising five quantum tetrahedra -- of the interactions of quantum spacetime. By measuring the geometric properties on the corresponding quantum tetrahedra and simulate their interactions, our experiment serves as the basic module that represents the Feynman diagram vertex in the spin-network formulation of quantum spacetime.
  • We analyze the resource overhead of recently proposed methods for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation using concatenated codes. Namely, we examine the concatenation of the 7-qubit Steane code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, which allows for the construction of the 49 and 105-qubit codes that do not require the need for magic state distillation for universality. We compute a lower bound for the adversarial noise threshold of the 105-qubit code and find it to be $8.33\times 10^{-6}.$ We obtain a depolarizing noise threshold for the 49-qubit code of $9.69\times 10^{-4}$ which is competitive with the 105-qubit threshold result of $1.28\times 10^{-3}$. We then provide lower bounds on the resource requirements of the 49 and 105-qubit codes and compare them with the surface code implementation of a logical $T$ gate using magic state distillation. For the sampled input error rates and noise model, we find that the surface code achieves a smaller overhead compared to our concatenated schemes.
  • Quantum simulation promises to have wide applications in many fields where problems are hard to model with classical computers. Various quantum devices of different platforms have been built to tackle the problems in, say, quantum chemistry, condensed matter physics, and high-energy physics. Here, we report an experiment towards the simulation of quantum gravity by simulating the holographic entanglement entropy. On a six-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we demonstrate a key result of Anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory(\adscft) correspondence---the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is demonstrated by measuring the relevant entanglement entropies on the perfect tensor state. The fidelity of our experimentally prepared the six-qubit state is 85.0\% via full state tomography and reaches 93.7\% if the signal-decay due to decoherence is taken into account. Our experiment serves as the basic module of simulating more complex tensor network states that exploring \adscft correspondence. As the initial experimental attempt to study \adscft via quantum information processing, our work opens up new avenues exploring quantum gravity phenomena on quantum simulators.
  • Quantum error correction is instrumental in protecting quantum systems from noise in quantum computing and communication settings. Pauli channels can be efficiently simulated and threshold values for Pauli error rates under a variety of error-correcting codes have been obtained. However, realistic quantum systems can undergo noise processes that differ significantly from Pauli noise. In this paper, we present an efficient hard decoding algorithm for optimizing thresholds and lowering failure rates of an error-correcting code under general completely positive and trace-preserving (i.e., Markovian) noise. We use our hard decoding algorithm to study the performance of several error-correcting codes under various non-Pauli noise models by computing threshold values and failure rates for these codes. We compare the performance of our hard decoding algorithm to decoders optimized for depolarizing noise and show improvements in thresholds and reductions in failure rates by several orders of magnitude. Our hard decoding algorithm can also be adapted to take advantage of a code's non-Pauli transversal gates to further suppress noise. For example, we show that using the transversal gates of the 5-qubit code allows arbitrary rotations around certain axes to be perfectly corrected. Furthermore, we show that Pauli twirling can increase or decrease the threshold depending upon the code properties. Lastly, we show that even if the physical noise model differs slightly from the hypothesized noise model used to determine an optimized decoder, failure rates can still be reduced by applying our hard decoding algorithm.
  • Systems passing through quantum critical points at finite rates have a finite probability of undergoing transitions between different eigenstates of the instantaneous Hamiltonian. This mechanism was proposed by Kibble as the underlying mechanism for the formation of topological defects in the early universe and by Zurek for condensed matter systems. Here, we use a system of nuclear spins as an experimental quantum simulator undergoing a non-equilibrium quantum phase transition. The experimental data confirm the validity of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism of defect formation.
  • We propose a method for increasing purity of interacting quantum systems that takes advantage of correlations present due to the internal interaction. In particular we show that by using the system's quantum correlations one can achieve cooling beyond established limits of previous conventional algorithmic cooling proposals which assume no interaction.
  • Superposition, arguably the most fundamental property of quantum mechanics, lies at the heart of quantum information science. However, how to create the superposition of any two unknown pure states remains as a daunting challenge. Recently, it is proved that such a quantum protocol does not exist if the two input states are completely unknown, whereas a probabilistic protocol is still available with some prior knowledge about the input states [M. Oszmaniec \emph{et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 110403 (2016)]. The knowledge is that both of the two input states have nonzero overlaps with some given referential state. In this work, we experimentally realize the probabilistic protocol of superposing two pure states in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance system. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by preparing a families of input states, and the average fidelity between the prepared state and expected superposition state is over 99%. Moreover, we experimentally illustrate the limitation of the protocol that it is likely to fail or yields very low fidelity, if the nonzero overlaps are approaching zero. Our experimental implementation can be extended to more complex situations and other quantum systems.
  • Controlled preparation of highly pure quantum states is at the core of practical applications of quantum information science, from the state initialization of most quantum algorithms to a reliable supply of ancilla qubits that satisfy the fault-tolerance threshold for quantum error correction. Heat-bath algorithmic cooling has been shown to purify qubits by controlled redistribution of entropy and multiple contact with a bath, not only for ensemble implementations but also for technologies with strong but imperfect measurements. However, an implicit restriction about the interaction with the bath has been assumed in previous work. In this paper, we show that better purification can be achieved by removing that restriction. More concretely, we include correlations between the system and the bath, and we take advantage of these correlations to pump entropy out of the system into the bath. We introduce a tool for cooling algorithms, which we call "state-reset", obtained when the coupling to the environment is generalized from individual-qubits relaxation to correlated-qubit relaxation. We present improved cooling algorithms which lead to an increase of purity beyond all the previous work, and relate our results to the Nuclear Overhauser Effect.
  • Topological orders can be used as media for topological quantum computing --- a promising quantum computation model due to its invulnerability against local errors. Conversely, a quantum simulator, often regarded as a quantum computing device for special purposes, also offers a way of characterizing topological orders. Here, we show how to identify distinct topological orders via measuring their modular $S$ and $T$ matrices. In particular, we employ a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator to study the properties of three topologically ordered matter phases described by the string-net model with two string types, including the $\Z_2$ toric code, doubled semion, and doubled Fibonacci. The third one, non-Abelian Fibonacci order is notably expected to be the simplest candidate for universal topological quantum computing. Our experiment serves as the basic module, built on which one can simulate braiding of non-Abelian anyons and ultimately topological quantum computation via the braiding, and thus provides a new approach of investigating topological orders using quantum computers.
  • Quantum computers promise to outperform their classical counterparts in many applications. Rapid experimental progress in the last two decades includes the first demonstrations of small-scale quantum processors, but realising large-scale quantum information processors capable of universal quantum control remains a challenge. One primary obstacle is the inadequacy of classical computers for the task of optimising the experimental control field as we scale up to large systems. Classical optimisation procedures require a simulation of the quantum system and have a running time that grows exponentially with the number of quantum bits (qubits) in the system. Here we show that it is possible to tackle this problem by using the quantum processor to optimise its own control fields. Using measurement-based quantum feedback control (MQFC), we created a 12-coherence state with the essential control pulse completely designed by a 12-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor. The results demonstrate the superiority of MQFC over classical optimisation methods, in both efficiency and accuracy. The time required for MQFC optimisation is linear in the number of qubits, and our 12-qubit system beat a classical computer configured with 2.4 GHz CPU and 8 GB memory. Furthermore, the fidelity of the MQFC-prepared 12-coherence was about 10% better than the best result using classical optimisation, since the feedback approach inherently corrects for unknown imperfections in the quantum processor. As MQFC is readily transferrable to other technologies for universal quantum information processors, we anticipate that this result will open the way to scalably and precisely control quantum systems, bringing us closer to a demonstration of quantum supremacy.
  • To exploit a given physical system for quantum information processing, it is critical to understand the different types of noise affecting quantum control. Distinguishing coherent and incoherent errors is extremely useful as they can be reduced in different ways. Coherent errors are generally easier to reduce at the hardware level, e.g. by improving calibration, whereas some sources of incoherent errors, e.g. T2* processes, can be reduced by engineering robust pulses. In this work, we illustrate how purity benchmarking and randomized benchmarking can be used together to distinguish between coherent and incoherent errors and to quantify the reduction in both of them due to using optimal control pulses and accounting for the transfer function in an electron spin resonance system. We also prove that purity benchmarking provides bounds on the optimal fidelity and diamond norm that can be achieved by correcting the coherent errors through improving calibration.
  • In creating a large-scale quantum information processor, the ability to construct control pulses for implementing an arbitrary quantum circuit in a scalable manner is an important requirement. For liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computing, a circuit is generally realized through a sequence of selective soft pulses, in which various control imperfections exist and are to be corrected. In this work, we present a comprehensive analysis of the errors arisen in a selective pulse network by using the zeroth and first order average Hamiltonian theory. Effective correction rules are derived for adjusting important pulse parameters such as irradiation frequencies, rotational angles and transmission phases of the selective pulses to increase the control fidelity. Simulations show that applying our compilation procedure for a given circuit is efficient and can greatly reduce the error accumulation.
  • The Leggett-Garg (LG) test of macroscopic realism involves a series of dichotomic non-invasive measurements that are used to calculate a function which has a fixed upper bound for a macrorealistic system and a larger upper bound for a quantum system. The quantum upper bound depends on both the details of the measurement and the dimension of the system. Here we present an LG experiment on a three-level quantum system, which produces a larger theoretical quantum upper bound than that of a two-level quantum system. The experiment is carried out in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and consists of the LG test as well as a test of the ideal assumptions associated with the experiment, such as measurement non-invasiveness. The non-invasive measurements are performed via the modified ideal negative result measurement scheme on a three-level system. Once these assumptions are tested, the violation becomes small, despite the fact that the LG value itself is large. Our results showcase the advantages of using the modified measurement scheme that can reach the higher LG values, as they give more room for hypothetical malicious errors in a real experiment
  • Spin systems controlled and probed by magnetic resonance have been valuable for testing the ideas of quantum control and quantum error correction. This paper introduces an X-band pulsed electron spin resonance spectrometer designed for high-fidelity coherent control of electron spins, including a loop-gap resonator for sub-millimeter sized samples with a control bandwidth ~ 40 MHz. Universal control is achieved by a single-sideband upconversion technique with an I-Q modulator and a 1.2 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. A single qubit randomized benchmarking protocol quantifies the average errors of Clifford gates implemented by simple Gaussian pulses, using a sample of gamma-irradiated quartz. Improvements in unitary gate fidelity are achieved through phase transient correction and hardware optimization. A preparation pulse sequence that selects spin packets in a narrowed distribution of static fields confirms that inhomogeneous dephasing (1/T2*) is the dominant source of gate error. The best average fidelity over the Clifford gates obtained here is 99.2%, which serves as a benchmark to compare with other technologies.
  • Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results advance the project of performing efficient and accurate quantum state tomography in practice.
  • Given its importance to many other areas of physics, from condensed matter physics to thermodynamics, time-reversal symmetry has had relatively little influence on quantum information science. Here we develop a network-based picture of time-reversal theory, classifying Hamiltonians and quantum circuits as time-symmetric or not in terms of the elements and geometries of their underlying networks. Many of the typical circuits of quantum information science are found to exhibit time-asymmetry. Moreover, we show that time-asymmetry in circuits can be controlled using local gates only, and can simulate time-asymmetry in Hamiltonian evolution. We experimentally implement a fundamental example in which controlled time-reversal asymmetry in a palindromic quantum circuit leads to near-perfect transport. Our results pave the way for using time-symmetry breaking to control coherent transport, and imply that time-asymmetry represents an omnipresent yet poorly understood effect in quantum information science.
  • Pure quantum states play a central role in applications of quantum information, both as initial states for many algorithms and as resources for quantum error correction. Preparation of highly pure states that satisfy the threshold for quantum error correction remains a challenge, not only for ensemble implementations like NMR or ESR but also for other technologies. Heat-Bath Algorithmic Cooling is a method to increase the purity of set of qubits coupled to a bath. We investigated the achievable polarization by analyzing the state when no more entropy can be extracted. In particular we give an analytic form for the maximum polarization of the purified qubit and corresponding state of the whole system for the case when the initial state of the qubits is totally mixed. It is however possible to reach higher polarization while starting with other states with higher polarization, thus our result provides an achievable lower bound. We also give an upper bound of the number of steps needed to get a certain required polarization.
  • Quantum error correction and fault-tolerance make it possible to perform quantum computations in the presence of imprecision and imperfections of realistic devices. An important question is to find the noise rate at which errors can be arbitrarily suppressed. By concatenating the 7-qubit Steane and 15-qubit Reed-Muller codes, the 105-qubit code enables a universal set of fault-tolerant gates despite not all of them being transversal. Importantly, the CNOT gate remains transversal in both codes, and as such has increased error protection relative to the other single qubit logical gates. We show that while the level-1 pseudo-threshold for the concatenated scheme is limited by the logical Hadamard, the error suppression of the logical CNOT gates allows for the asymptotic threshold to increase by orders of magnitude at higher levels. We establish a lower bound of $1.28~\times~10^{-3}$ for the asymptotic threshold of this code which is competitive with known concatenated models and does not rely on ancillary magic state preparation for universal computation.
  • We examine the problem of finding the minimum number of Pauli measurements needed to uniquely determine an arbitrary $n$-qubit pure state among all quantum states. We show that only $11$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary two-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $16$ measurements, and only $31$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary three-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $64$ measurements. We demonstrate that our protocol is robust under depolarizing error with simulated random pure states. We experimentally test the protocol on two- and three-qubit systems with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. We show that the pure state tomography protocol saves us a number of measurements without considerable loss of fidelity. We compare our protocol with same-size sets of randomly selected Pauli operators and find that our selected set of Pauli measurements significantly outperforms those random sampling sets. As a direct application, our scheme can also be used to reduce the number of settings needed for pure-state tomography in quantum optical systems.
  • Anyons, quasiparticles living in two-dimensional spaces with exotic exchange statistics, can serve as the fundamental units for fault-tolerant quantum computation. However, experimentally demonstrating anyonic statistics is a challenge due to the technical limitations of current experimental platforms. Here, we take a state perpetration approach to mimic anyons in the Kitaev lattice model using a 7-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. Anyons are created by dynamically preparing the ground and excited states of the 7-qubit Kitaev lattice model, and are subsequently braided along two distinct, but topologically equivalent, paths. We observe that the phase acquired by the anyons is independent of the path, and coincides with the ideal theoretical predictions when decoherence and implementation errors are taken into account. As the first demonstration of the topological path independence of anyons, our experiment helps to study and exploit the anyonic properties towards the goal of building a topological quantum computer.
  • In a recent paper, PRL 114 100404, 2015, Raeisi and Mosca gave a limit for cooling with Heat-Bath Algorithmic Cooling (HBAC). Here we show how to exceed that limit by having correlation in the qubits-bath interaction.
  • Entanglement, one of the central mysteries of quantum mechanics, plays an essential role in numerous applications of quantum information theory. A natural question of both theoretical and experimental importance is whether universal entanglement detection is possible without full state tomography. In this work, we prove a no-go theorem that rules out this possibility for any non-adaptive schemes that employ single-copy measurements only. We also examine in detail a previously implemented experiment, which claimed to detect entanglement of two-qubit states via adaptive single-copy measurements without full state tomography. By performing the experiment and analyzing the data, we demonstrate that the information gathered is indeed sufficient to reconstruct the state. These results reveal a fundamental limit for single-copy measurements in entanglement detection, and provides a general framework to study the detection of other interesting properties of quantum states, such as the positivity of partial transpose and the $k$-symmetric extendibility.
  • We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the $n$-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory.
  • Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic open quantum systems is one of the most challenging and exciting frontiers in quantum sciences and technologies. In this Letter, we present methods of approximately computing reachable sets for coherently controlled dissipative systems, which is very useful for assessing control performances. We apply this to a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system and implement some tasks of quantum control in open systems at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudo-pure states. Our work shows interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.