• Cubic Pr-based compounds with non-Kramers doublet ground states are capable of realizing a novel spinorial hybridization phase ('hastatic' order) that breaks both single- and double- time reversal symmetries. We develop a simple, yet realistic model of spatially uniform ferrohastatic order and elaborate its experimental consequences and behavior in magnetic field. We also discuss the possibility that the "Pr-1-2-20" cage compounds may realize ferrohastatic order at finite fields.
  • Double-stripe magnetism $[\mathbf{Q}=(\pi/2, \pi/2)]$ has been proposed as the magnetic ground state for both the iron-telluride and BaTi$_2$Sb$_2$O families of superconductors. Double-stripe order is captured within a $J_1-J_2-J_3$ Heisenberg model in the regime $J_3 \gg J_2 \gg J_1$. Intriguingly, besides breaking spin-rotational symmetry, the ground state manifold has three additional Ising degrees of freedom associated with bond-ordering. Via their coupling to the lattice, they give rise to an orthorhombic distortion and to two non-uniform lattice distortions with wave-vector $(\pi, \pi)$. Because the ground state is four-fold degenerate, modulo rotations in spin space, only two of these Ising bond order parameters are independent. Here we introduce an effective field theory to treat all Ising order parameters, as well as magnetic order, and solve it within a large-$N$ limit. All three transitions, corresponding to the condensations of two Ising bond order parameters and one magnetic order parameter are simultaneous and first order in three dimensions, but lower dimensionality, or equivalently weaker interlayer coupling, and weaker magnetoelastic coupling can split the three transitions, and in some cases allows for two separate Ising phase transitions above the magnetic one.
  • The heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 continues to attract great interest due to the long- unidentified nature of the hidden order that develops below 17.5K. Here we discuss the implications of an angular survey of the linear and nonlinear susceptibility of URu2Si2 in the vicinity of the hidden order transition. While the anisotropic nature of spin fluctuations and low-temperature quasiparticles was previously established, our recent results suggest that the order parameter itself has intrinsic Ising anisotropy, and that moreover this anisotropy extends far above the hidden order transition. Consistency checks and subsequent questions for future experimental and theoretical studies of hidden order are discussed.
  • The heavy fermion compound URu$_2$Si$_2$ continues to attract great interest due to the unidentified hidden order it develops below 17.5K. The unique Ising character of the spin fluctuations and low temperature quasiparticles is well established. We present detailed measurements of the angular anisotropy of the nonlinear magnetization that reveal a $\cos^4 \theta$ Ising anisotropy both at and above the ordering transition. With Landau theory, we show this implies a strongly Ising character of the itinerant hidden order parameter.
  • Single crystals of $R$Mg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ ($R$=Y, Ce-Nd, Gd-Dy, Yb) were grown using a high-temperature solution growth technique and were characterized by measurements of room-temperature x-ray diffraction, temperature-dependent specific heat and temperature-, field-dependent resistivity and anisotropic magnetization. YMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ is a non-local-moment-bearing metal with an electronic specific heat coefficient, $\gamma \sim$ 15 mJ/mol K$^2$. Yb is divalent and basically non-moment bearing in YbMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$. Ce is trivalent in CeMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ with two magnetic transitions being observed at 2.1 K and 1.5 K. PrMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ does not exhibit any magnetic phase transition down to 0.5 K. The other members being studied ($R$=Nd, Gd-Dy) all exhibits antiferromagnetic transitions at low-temperatures ranging from 3.2 K for NdMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ to 11.9 K for TbMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$. Whereas GdMg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ is isotropic in its paramagnetic state due to zero angular momentum ($L$=0), all the other local-moment-bearing members manifest an anisotropic, planar magnetization in their paramagnetic states. To further study this planar anisotropy, detailed angular-dependent magnetization was carried out on magnetically diluted (Y$_{0.99}$Tb$_{0.01}$)Mg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$ and (Y$_{0.99}$Dy$_{0.01}$)Mg$_{2}$Cu$_{9}$. Despite the strong, planar magnetization anisotropy, the in-plane magnetic anisotropy is weak and field-dependent. A set of crystal electric field parameters are proposed to explain the observed magnetic anisotropy.
  • We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES), Raman spectroscopy, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and x-ray scattering to reveal an unusual electronically mediated charge density wave (CDW) in K0.9Mo6O17. Not only does K0.9Mo6O17 lack signatures of electron-phonon coupling, but it also hosts an extraordinary surface CDW, with TS CDW =220 K nearly twice that of the bulk CDW, TB CDW =115 K. While the bulk CDW has a BCS-like gap of 12 meV, the surface gap is ten times larger and well in the strong coupling regime. Strong coupling behavior combined with the absence of signatures of strong electron-phonon coupling indicates that the CDW is likely mediated by electronic interactions enhanced by low dimensionality.
  • We use a tunable laser ARPES to study the electronic properties of the prototypical multiband BCS superconductor MgB2. Our data reveal a strong renormalization of the dispersion (kink) at ~65 meV, which is caused by coupling of electrons to the E2g phonon mode. In contrast to cuprates, the 65 meV kink in MgB2 does not change significantly across Tc. More interestingly, we observe strong coupling to a second, lower energy collective mode at binding energy of 10 meV. This excitation vanishes above Tc and is likely a signature of the elusive Leggett mode.
  • The recent observation of fully-gapped superconductivity in Yb doped CeCoIn5 poses a paradox, for the disappearance of nodes suggests that they are accidental, yet d-wave symmetry with protected nodes is we ll established by experiment. Here, we show that composite pairing provides a natural resolution: in this scenario, Yb doping drives a Lifshitz transition of the nodal Fermi surface, forming a fully-gapped d-wave molecular superfluid of composite pairs. The T4 dependence of the penetration depth associated with the sound mode of this condensate is in accord with observation.
  • The broken symmetry that develops below 17.5K in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 has long eluded identification. Here we argue that the recent observation of Ising quasiparticles in URu2Si2 results from a spinor hybridization order parameter that breaks double time-reversal symmetry by mixing states of integer and half-integer spin. Such "hastatic order" (hasta:[Latin]spear) hybridizes Kramers conduction electrons with Ising, non-Kramers 5f2 states of the uranium atoms to produce Ising quasiparticles. The development of a spinorial hybridization at 17.5K accounts for both the large entropy of condensation and the magnetic anomaly observed in torque magnetometry. This paper develops the theory of hastatic order in detail, providing the mathematical development of its key concepts. Hastatic order predicts a tiny transverse moment in the conduction sea, a collosal Ising anisotropy in the nonlinear susceptibility anomaly and a resonant energy-dependent nematicity in the tunneling density of states.
  • Adding a second Kondo channel to heavy fermion materials reveals new exotic symmetry breaking phases associated with the development of Kondo coherence. In this paper, we review two such phases, the "hastatic order" associated with non-Kramers doublet ground states, where the two-channel nature of the Kondo coupling is guaranteed by virtual valence fluctuations to an excited Kramers doublet, and "composite pair superconductivity," where the two channels differ by charge 2e and can be thought of as virtual valence fluctuations to a pseudo-isospin doublet. The similarities and differences between these two orders will be discussed, along with possible realizations in actinide and rare earth materials like URu2Si2 and NpPd5Al2.
  • The observation of Ising quasiparticles is a signatory feature of the hidden order phase of URu$_2$Si$_2$. In this paper we discuss its nature and the strong constraints it places on current theories of the hidden order. In the hastatic theory such anisotropic quasiparticles are naturally described described by resonant scattering between half-integer spin conduction electrons and integer-spin Ising moments. The hybridization that mixes states of different Kramers parity is spinorial; its role as an symmetry-breaking order parameter is consistent with optical and tunnelling probes that indicate its sudden development at the hidden order transition. We discuss the microscopic origin of hastatic order, identifying it as a fractionalization of three body bound-states into integer spin fermions and half-integer spin bosons. After reviewing key features of hastatic order and their broader implications, we discuss our predictions for experiment and recent measurements. We end with challenges both for hastatic order and more generally for any theory of the hidden order state in URu$_2$Si$_2$.
  • The hidden order developing below 17.5K in the heavy fermion material URu2Si2 has eluded identification for over twenty five years. This paper will review the recent theory of ``hastatic order,'' a novel two-component order parameter capturing the hybridization between half-integer spin (Kramers) conduction electrons and the non-Kramers 5f^2 Ising local moments, as strongly indicated by the observation of Ising quasiparticles in de Haas-van Alphen measurements. Hastatic order differs from conventional magnetism as it is a spinor order that breaks both single and double time-reversal symmetry by mixing states of different Kramers parity. The broken time-reversal symmetry simply explains both the pseudo-Goldstone mode between the hidden order and antiferromagnetic phases and the nematic order seen in torque magnetometry. The spinorial nature of the hybridization also explains how the Kondo effect gives a phase transition, with the hybridization gap turning on at the hidden order transition as seen in scanning tunneling microscopy. Hastatic order also has a number of new predictions: a basal-plane magnetic moment of order .01\mu_B, a gap to longitudinal spin fluctuations that vanishes continuously at the first order antiferromagnetic transition and a narrow resonant nematic feature in the scanning tunneling spectra.
  • We introduce the idea of emergent lattices, where a simple lattice decouples into two weakly-coupled lattices as a way to stabilize spin liquids. In LiZn2Mo3O8, the disappearance of 2/3rds of the spins at low temperatures suggests that its triangular lattice decouples into an emergent honeycomb lattice weakly coupled to the remaining spins, and we suggest several ways to test this proposal. We show that these orphan spins act to stabilize the spin-liquid in the $J_1-J_2$ honeycomb model and also discuss a possible 3D analogue, Ba2MoYO6 that may form a "depleted fcc lattice."
  • Motivated by the potential chiral spin liquid in the metallic spin ice Pr2Ir2O7, we consider how such a chiral state might be selected from the spin ice manifold. We propose that chiral fluctuations of the conducting Ir moments promote ferro-chiral couplings between the local Pr moments, as a chiral analogue of the magnetic RKKY effect. Pr2Ir2O7 provides an ideal setting to explore such a chiral RKKY effect, given the inherent chirality of the spin-ice manifold. We use a slave-rotor calculation on the pyrochlore lattice to estimate the sign and magnitude of the chiral coupling, and find it can easily explain the 1.5K transition to a ferro-chiral state.
  • Motivated by recent quantum oscillations experiments on URu_2Si_2, we discuss the microscopic origin of the large anisotropy observed many years ago in the anomaly of the nonlinear susceptibility in this same material. We show that the magnitude of this anomaly emerges naturally from hastatic order, a proposal for hidden order that is a two-component spinor arising from the hybridization of a non-Kramers Gamma_5 doublet with Kramers conduction electrons. A prediction is made for the angular anisotropy of the nonlinear susceptibility anomaly as a test of this proposed order parameter for URu_2Si_2.
  • The development of collective long-range order via phase transitions occurs by the spontaneous breaking of fundamental symmetries. Magnetism is a consequence of broken time-reversal symmetry while superfluidity results from broken gauge invariance. The broken symmetry that develops below 17.5K in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 has long eluded such identification. Here we show that the recent observation of Ising quasiparticles in URu2Si2 results from a spinor order parameter that breaks double time-reversal symmetry, mixing states of integer and half-integer spin. Such "hastatic order" hybridizes conduction electrons with Ising 5f^{2} states of the uranium atoms to produce Ising quasiparticles; it accounts for the large entropy of condensation and the magnetic anomaly observed in torque magnetometry. Hastatic order predicts a tiny transverse moment in the conduction sea, a collosal Ising anisotropy in the nonlinear susceptibility anomaly and a resonant energy-dependent nematicity in the tunneling density of states.
  • The microscopic nature of the hidden order state in URu2Si2 is dependent on the low-energy configurations of the uranium ions, and there is currently no consensus on whether it is predominantly 5f^2 or 5f^3. Here we show that measurement of the basal-plane nonlinear susceptibility can resolve this issue; its sign at low-temperatures is a distinguishing factor. We calculate the linear and nonlinear susceptibilities for specific 5f^2 and 5f^3 crystal-field schemes that are consistent with current experiment. Because of its dual magnetic and orbital character, a \Gamma_5 magnetic non-Kramers doublet ground-state of the U ion can be identified by $\chi_1^c(T) \propto \chi_3^\perp(T)$ where we have determined the constant of proportionality for URu2Si2.
  • The possible discovery of $s_\pm$ superconducting gaps in the moderately correlated iron-based superconductors has raised the question of how to properly treat $s_\pm$ gaps in strongly correlated superconductors. Unlike the d-wave cuprates, the Coulomb repulsion does not vanish by symmetry, and a careful treatment is essential. Thus far, only the weak correlation approaches have included this Coulomb pseudopotential, so here we introduce a symplectic N treatment of the t-J model that incorporates the strong Coulomb repulsion through the complete elimination of on-site pairing. Through a proper extension of time-reversal symmetry to the large N limit, symplectic-N is the first superconducting large N solution of the t-J model. For d-wave superconductors, the previous uncontrolled mean field solutions are reproduced, while for $s_\pm$ superconductors, the SU(2) constraint enforcing single occupancy acts as a pair chemical potential adjusting the location of the gap nodes. This adjustment can capture the wide variety of gaps proposed for the iron based superconductors: line and point nodes, as well as two different, but related full gaps on different Fermi surfaces.
  • Using a two-channel Anderson model, we develop a theory of composite pairing in the 115 family of heavy fermion superconductors that incorporates the effects of f-electron valence fluctuations. Our calculations introduce "symplectic Hubbard operators": an extension of the slave boson Hubbard operators that preserves both spin rotation and time-reversal symmetry in a large N expansion, permitting a unified treatment of anisotropic singlet pairing and valence fluctuations. We find that the development of composite pairing in the presence of valence fluctuations manifests itself as a phase-coherent mixing of the empty and doubly occupied configurations of the mixed valent ion. This effect redistributes the f-electron charge within the unit cell. Our theory predicts a sharp superconducting shift in the nuclear quadrupole resonance frequency associated with this redistribution. We calculate the magnitude and sign of the predicted shift expected in CeCoIn_5.
  • We examine the internal structure of the heavy fermion condensate, showing that it necessarily involves a d-wave pair of quasiparticles on neighboring lattice sites, condensed in tandem with a composite pair of electrons bound to a local moment, within a single unit cell. These two components draw upon the antiferromagnetic and Kondo interactions to cooperatively enhance the superconducting transition temperature. The tandem condensate is electrostatically active, with a small electric quadrupole moment coupling to strain that is predicted to lead to a superconducting shift in the NQR frequency.
  • Identifying the time reversal symmetry of spins as a symplectic symmetry, we develop a large N approximation for quantum magnetism that embraces both antiferromagnetism and ferromagnetism. In SU(N), N>2, not all spins invert under time reversal, so we have introduced a new large N treatment which builds interactions exclusively out of the symplectic subgroup [SP(N)] of time reversing spins, a more stringent condition than the symplectic symmetry of previous SP(N) large N treatments. As a result, we obtain a mean field theory that incorporates the energy cost of frustrated bonds. When applied to the frustrated square lattice, the ferromagnetic bonds restore the frustration dependence of the critical spin in the Neel phase, and recover the correct frustration dependence of the finite temperature Ising transition.
  • The recent discovery of two heavy fermion materials PuCoGa_{5} and NpPd_{5}Al_{2} which transform directly from Curie paramagnets into superconductors, reveals a new class of superconductor where local moments quench directly into a superconducting condensate. A powerful tool in the description of heavy fermion metals is the large N expansion, which expands the physics in powers of 1/N about a solvable limit where particles carry a large number (N) of spin components. As it stands, this method is unable to jointly describe the spin quenching and superconductivity which develop in PuCoGa_{5} and NpPd_{5}Al_{2}. Here, we solve this problem with a new class of large N expansion that employs the symplectic symmetry of spin to protect the odd time-reversal parity of spin and sustain Cooper pairs as well-defined singlets. With this method we show that when a lattice of magnetic ions exchange spin with their metallic environment in two distinct symmetry channels, they are able to simultaneously satisfy both channels by forming a condensate of composite pairs between between local moments and electrons. In the tetragonal crystalline environment relevant to PuCoGa_{5} and NpPd_{5}Al_{2} the lattice structure selects a natural pair of spin exchange channels, giving rise to the prediction of a unique anisotropic paired state with g-wave symmetry. This pairing mechanism predicts a large upturn in the NMR relaxation rate above T_{c}, a strong enhancement of Andreev reflection in tunneling measurements and an enhanced superconducting transition temperature T_{c} in Pu doped Np_{1-x}Pu_{x}Pd_{5}Al_{2}.
  • This online material provides the technical detail for ``Heavy electrons and the symplectic symmetry of spin",(arXiv 0710.1122). Three parts. Part I - symplectic spins, their properties and gauge symmetries. Part II - derivation of two-chanel model for tetragonal heavy electron systems with the view to application to PuCoGa5 and NpPd_5Al_2, symplectic-N mean field theory and computation of NMR relaxation rate. Part III - brief discussion of the application to frustrated magnetism in the J1-J2 model, mainly used to test the method.