• A proof that almost all quantum systems have trap free (that is, free from local optima) landscapes is presented for a large and physically general class of quantum system. This result offers an explanation for why gradient methods succeed so frequently in quantum control in both theory and practice. The role of singular controls is analyzed using geometric tools in the case of the control of the propagator of closed finite dimension systems. This type of control field has been implicated as a source of landscape traps. The conditions under which singular controls can introduce traps, and thus interrupt the progress of a control optimization, are discussed and a geometrical characterization of the issue is presented. It is shown that a control being singular is not sufficient to cause a control optimization progress to halt and sufficient conditions for a trap free landscape are presented. It is further shown that the local surjectivity axiom of landscape analysis can be refined to the condition that the end-point map is transverse to each of the level sets of the fidelity function. This novel condition is shown to be sufficient for a quantum system's landscape to be trap free. The control landscape for a quantum system is shown to be trap free for all but a null set of Hamiltonians using a novel geometric technique based on the parametric transversality theorem. Numerical evidence confirming this is also presented. This result is the analogue of the work of Altifini, wherein it is shown that controllability holds for all but a null set of quantum systems in the dipole approximation. The presented results indicate that by-and-large limited control resources are the most physically relevant source of landscape traps.
  • We theoretically study a strongly-driven optomechanical system which consists of a passive optical cavity and an active mechanical resonator. When the optomechanical coupling strength is varied, phase transitions, which are similar those observed in $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric systems, are observed. We show that the optical transmission can be controlled by changing the gain of the mechanical resonator and loss of the optical cavity mode. Especially, we find that: (i) for balanced gain and loss, optical amplification and absorption can be tuned by changing the optomechanical coupling strength through a control field; (ii) for unbalanced gain and loss, even with a tiny mechanical gain, both optomechanically-induced transparency and anomalous dispersion can be observed around a critical point, which exhibits an ultra-long group delay. The time delay $\tau$ can be optimized by regulating the optomechanical coupling strength through the control field and improved up to several orders of magnitude ($\tau\sim2$ $\mathrm{ms}$) compared to that of conventional optomechanical systems ($\tau\sim1$ $\mu\mathrm{s}$). The presence of mechanical gain makes the group delay more robust to environmental perturbations. Our proposal provides a powerful platform to control light transport using a $\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric-like optomechanical system.
  • Here we consider the speed at which quantum information can be transferred between the nodes of a linear network. Because such nodes are linear oscillators, this speed is also important in the cooling and state preparation of mechanical oscillators, as well as frequency conversion. We show that if there is no restriction on the size of the linear coupling between two oscillators, then there exist control protocols that will swap their respective states with high fidelity within a time much less than a single oscillation period. Standard gradient search methods fail to find these fast protocols. We were able to do so by augmenting standard search methods with a path-tracing technique, demonstrating that this technique has remarkable power to solve time-optimal control problems, as well as confirming the highly challenging nature of these problems. As a further demonstration of the power of path-tracing, first introduced by Moore-Tibbets et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 062309 (2012)], we apply it to the generation of entanglement in a linear network.
  • We investigate the control landscapes of closed, finite level quantum systems beyond the dipole approximation by including a polarizability term in the Hamiltonian. Theoretical analysis is presented for the $n$ level case and formulas for singular controls, which are candidates for landscape traps, are compared to their analogues in the dipole approximation. A numerical analysis of the existence of traps in control landscapes beyond the dipole approximation is made in the four level case. A numerical exploration of these control landscapes is achieved by generating many random Hamiltonians which include a term quadratic in a single control field. The landscapes of such systems are found numerically to be trap free in general. This extends a great body of recent work on typical landscapes of quantum systems where the dipole approximation is made. We further investigate the relationship between the magnitude of the polarizability and the magnitude of the controls resulting from optimization. It is shown numerically that including a polarizability term in an otherwise uncontrollable system removes traps from the landscapes of a specific family of systems by restoring controllability. We numerically assess the effect of a random polarizability term on the know example of a three level system with a second order trap in its control landscape. It is found that the addition of polarizability removes the trap from the landscape. The implications for laboratory control are discussed.
  • This work develops measures for quantifying the effects of field noise upon targeted unitary transformations. Robustness to noise is assessed in the framework of the quantum control landscape, which is the mapping from the control to the unitary transformation performance measure (quantum gate fidelity). Within that framework, a new geometric interpretation of stochastic noise effects naturally arises, where more robust optimal controls are associated with regions of small overlap between landscape curvature and the noise correlation function. Numerical simulations of this overlap in the context of quantum information processing reveal distinct noise spectral regimes that better support robust control solutions. This perspective shows the dual importance of both noise statistics and the control form for robustness, thereby opening up new avenues of investigation on how to mitigate noise effects in quantum systems.
  • Optimal control of molecular dynamics is commonly expressed from a quantum mechanical perspective. However, in most contexts the preponderance of molecular dynamics studies utilize classical mechanical models. This paper treats laser-driven optimal control of molecular dynamics in a classical framework. We consider the objective of steering a molecular system from an initial point in phase space to a target point, subject to the dynamic constraint of Hamilton's equations. The classical control landscape corresponding to this objective is a functional of the control field, and the topology of the landscape is analyzed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under specific assumptions on the regularity of the control fields, the classical control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating the presence of an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical principles on a) a model diatomic molecule, b) two coupled Morse oscillators, and c) a chaotic system with a coupled quartic oscillator, confirming the absence of traps in the classical control landscape. We compare the classical formulation with the mathematically analogous state-to-state transition probability control landscape of N-level quantum systems. The absence of traps in both circumstances provides a broader basis to understand the growing number of successful control experiments with complex molecules, which can have dynamics that transcend the classical and quantum regimes.
  • Generating a unitary transformation in the shortest possible time is of practical importance to quantum information processing because it helps to reduce decoherence effects and improve robustness to additive control field noise. Many analytical and numerical studies have identified the minimum time necessary to implement a variety of quantum gates on coupled-spin qubit systems. This work focuses on exploring the Pareto front that quantifies the trade-off between the competitive objectives of maximizing the gate fidelity $\mathcal{F}$ and minimizing the control time $T$. In order to identify the critical time $T^{\ast}$, below which the target transformation is not reachable, as well as to determine the associated Pareto front, we introduce a numerical method of Pareto front tracking (PFT). We consider closed two- and multi-qubit systems with constant inter-qubit coupling strengths and each individual qubit controlled by a separate time-dependent external field. Our analysis demonstrates that unit fidelity (to a desired numerical accuracy) can be achieved at any $T \geq T^{\ast}$ in most cases. However, the optimization search effort rises superexponentially as $T$ decreases and approaches $T^{\ast}$. Furthermore, a small decrease in control time incurs a significant penalty in fidelity for $T < T^{\ast}$, indicating that it is generally undesirable to operate below the critical time. We investigate the dependence of the critical time $T^{\ast}$ on the coupling strength between qubits and the target gate transformation. Practical consequences of these findings for laboratory implementation of quantum gates are discussed.
  • We investigate theoretically the implementation of two-qubit gates in a system of two coupled superconducting qubits. In particular, we analyze two-qubit gate operations under the condition that the coupling strength is comparable to or even larger than the anharmonicity of the qubits. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation, we obtain the dependence of the two-qubit gate fidelity on the system parameters in the case of direct and indirect qubit-qubit coupling. Our numerical results can be used to identify the "safe" parameter regime for experimentally implementing two-qubit gates with high fidelity in these systems.
  • Many quantum control problems are formulated as a search for an optimal field that maximizes a physical objective. This search is performed over a landscape defined as the objective as a function of the control field. A recent Letter [A. N. Pechen and D. J. Tannor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 120402 (2011)] asserts that the existence of special landscape critical points (CPs) with trapping characteristics is "contrary to recent claims in the literature" and "can have profound implications for both theoretical and experimental quantum control studies." We show here that these assertions are inaccurate and misleading.
  • We perform a functional expansion of the fidelity between two unitary matrices in order to find the necessary conditions for the robust implementation of a target gate. Comparison of these conditions with those obtained from the Magnus expansion and Dyson series shows that they are equivalent in first order. By exploiting techniques from robust design optimization, we account for issues of experimental feasibility by introducing an additional criterion to the search for control pulses. This search is accomplished by exploring the competition between the multiple objectives in the implementation of the NOT gate by means of evolutionary multi-objective optimization.
  • Many proposals have been put forth for controlling quantum phenomena, including open-loop, adaptive feedback, and real-time feedback control. Each of these approaches has been viewed as operationally, and even physically, distinct from the others. This work shows that all such scenarios inherently share the same fundamental control features residing in the topology of the landscape relating the target physical observable to the applied controls. This unified foundation may provide a basis for development of hybrid control schemes that would combine the advantages of the existing approaches to achieve the best overall performance.
  • A quantum control landscape is defined as the objective to be optimized as a function of the control variables. Existing empirical and theoretical studies reveal that most realistic quantum control landscapes are generally devoid of false traps. However, the impact of singular controls has yet to be investigated, which can arise due to a singularity on the mapping from the control to the final quantum state. We provide an explicit characterization of such controls that are strongly Hamiltonian-dependent and investigate their associated landscape geometry. Although in principle the singularities may correspond to local traps, we did not find any in numerical simulations. Also, as they occupy a small portion of the entire set of possible critical controls, their influence is expected to be much smaller than controls corresponding to the commonly located regular extremals. This observation supports the established ease of optimal searches to find high-quality controls in simulations and experiments.
  • The reliable and precise generation of quantum unitary transformations is essential to the realization of a number of fundamental objectives, such as quantum control and quantum information processing. Prior work has explored the optimal control problem of generating such unitary transformations as a surface optimization problem over the quantum control landscape, defined as a metric for realizing a desired unitary transformation as a function of the control variables. It was found that under the assumption of non-dissipative and controllable dynamics, the landscape topology is trap-free, implying that any reasonable optimization heuristic should be able to identify globally optimal solutions. The present work is a control landscape analysis incorporating specific constraints in the Hamiltonian corresponding to certain dynamical symmetries in the underlying physical system. It is found that the presence of such symmetries does not destroy the trap-free topology. These findings expand the class of quantum dynamical systems on which control problems are intrinsically amenable to solution by optimal control.
  • Quantum measurements are considered for optimal control of quantum dynamics with instantaneous and continuous observations utilized to manipulate population transfer. With an optimal set of measurements, the highest yield in a two-level system can be obtained. The analytical solution is given for the problem of population transfer by measurement-assisted coherent control in a three-level system with a dynamical symmetry. The anti-Zeno effect is recovered in the controlled processes. The demonstrations in the paper show that suitable observations can be powerful tools in the manipulation of quantum dynamics.
  • We describe algorithms, and experimental strategies, for the Pareto optimal control problem of simultaneously driving an arbitrary number of quantum observable expectation values to their respective extrema. Conventional quantum optimal control strategies are less effective at sampling points on the Pareto frontier of multiobservable control landscapes than they are at locating optimal solutions to single observable control problems. The present algorithms facilitate multiobservable optimization by following direct paths to the Pareto front, and are capable of continuously tracing the front once it is found to explore families of viable solutions. The numerical and experimental methodologies introduced are also applicable to other problems that require the simultaneous control of large numbers of observables, such as quantum optimal mixed state preparation.
  • We present deterministic algorithms for the simultaneous control of an arbitrary number of quantum observables. Unlike optimal control approaches based on cost function optimization, quantum multiobservable tracking control (MOTC) is capable of tracking predetermined homotopic trajectories to target expectation values in the space of multiobservables. The convergence of these algorithms is facilitated by the favorable critical topology of quantum control landscapes. Fundamental properties of quantum multiobservable control landscapes that underlie the efficiency of MOTC, including the multiobservable controllability Gramian, are introduced. The effects of multiple control objectives on the structure and complexity of optimal fields are examined. With minor modifications, the techniques described herein can be applied to general quantum multiobjective control problems.
  • A quantum control landscape is defined as the physical objective as a function of the control variables to be optimized. Analyzing the topology of these landscapes is important for understanding the origins of the increasing number of laboratory successes in the optimal control of quantum processes. This paper proposes a simple scheme to compute the characteristics of the critical topology of the quantum ensemble control landscapes for observables, showing that the set of disjoint critical submanifolds one-to-one corresponds to a finite number of contingency tables that solely depend on the degeneracy structure of the eigenvalues of the initial system density matrix and the observable to be controlled. The landscape characteristics can be calculated as functions of the table entries, including the dimensions and the numbers of positive and negative eigenvalues of the Hessian quadratic form of each of the connected components of the critical submanifolds. Typical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.
  • A quantum control landscape is defined as the physical objective as a function of the control variables. In this paper the control landscapes for two-level open quantum systems, whose evolution is described by general completely positive trace preserving maps (i.e., Kraus maps), are investigated in details. The objective function, which is the expectation value of a target system operator, is defined on the Stiefel manifold representing the space of Kraus maps. Three practically important properties of the objective function are found: (a) the absence of local maxima or minima (i.e., false traps); (b) the existence of multi-dimensional sub-manifolds of optimal solutions corresponding to the global maximum and minimum; and (c) the connectivity of each level set. All of the critical values and their associated critical sub-manifolds are explicitly found for any initial system state. Away from the absolute extrema there are no local maxima or minima, and only saddles may exist, whose number and the explicit structure of the corresponding critical sub-manifolds are determined by the initial system state. There are no saddles for pure initial states, one saddle for a completely mixed initial state, and two saddles for other initial states. In general, the landscape analysis of critical points and optimal manifolds is relevant to the problem of explaining the relative ease of obtaining good optimal control outcomes in the laboratory, even in the presence of the environment.
  • Optimization problems over compact Lie groups have been extensively studied due to their broad applications in linear programming and optimal control. This paper analyzes least square problems over a noncompact Lie group, the symplectic group $\Sp(2N,\R)$, which can be used to assess the optimality of control over dynamical transformations in classical mechanics and quantum optics. The critical topology for minimizing the Frobenius distance from a target symplectic transformation is solved. It is shown that the critical points include a unique local minimum and a number of saddle points. The topology is more complicated than those of previously studied problems on compact Lie groups such as the orthogonal and unitary groups because the incompatibility of the Frobenius norm with the pseudo-Riemannian structure on the symplectic group brings significant nonlinearity to the problem. Nonetheless, the lack of traps guarantees the global convergence of local optimization algorithms.
  • We study the Hamiltonian-independent contribution to the complexity of quantum optimal control problems. The optimization of controls that steer quantum systems to desired objectives can itself be considered a classical dynamical system that executes an analog computation. The system-independent component of the equations of motion of this dynamical system can be integrated analytically for various classes of discrete quantum control problems. For the maximization of observable expectation values from an initial pure state and the maximization of the fidelity of quantum gates, the time complexity of the corresponding computation belongs to the class continuous log (CLOG), the lowest analog complexity class, equivalent to the discrete complexity class NC. The simple scaling of the Hamiltonian-independent contribution to these problems with quantum system dimension indicates that with appropriately designed search algorithms, quantum optimal control can be rendered efficient even for large systems.
  • Existing algorithms for the optimal control of quantum observables are based on locally optimal steps in the space of control fields, or as in the case of genetic algorithms, operate on the basis of heuristics that do not explicitly take into account details pertaining to the geometry of the search space. We present globally efficient algorithms for quantum observable control that follow direct or close-to-direct paths in the domain of unitary dynamical propagators, based on partial reconstruction of these propagators at successive points along the search trajectory through orthogonal observable measurements. These algorithms can be implemented experimentally and offer an alternative to the adaptive learning control approach to optimal control experiments (OCE). Their performance is compared to that of local gradient-based control optimization.
  • We apply the methodology of optimal control theory to the problem of implementing quantum gates in continuous variable systems with quadratic Hamiltonians. We demonstrate that it is possible to define a fidelity measure for continuous variable (CV) gate optimization that is devoid of traps, such that the search for optimal control fields using local algorithms will not be hindered. The optimal control of several quantum computing gates, as well as that of algorithms composed of these primitives, is investigated using several typical physical models and compared for discrete and continuous quantum systems. Numerical simulations indicate that the optimization of generic CV quantum gates is inherently more expensive than that of generic discrete variable quantum gates, and that the exact-time controllability of CV systems plays an important role in determining the maximum achievable gate fidelity. The resulting optimal control fields typically display more complicated Fourier spectra that suggest a richer variety of possible control mechanisms. Moreover, the ability to control interactions between qunits is important for delimiting the total control fluence. The comparative ability of current experimental protocols to implement such time-dependent controls may help determine which physical incarnations of CV quantum information processing will be the easiest to implement with optimal fidelity.
  • A quantum control landscape is defined as the observable as a function(al) of the system control variables. Such landscapes were introduced to provide a basis to understand the increasing number of successful experiments controlling quantum dynamics phenomena. This paper extends the concept to encompass the broader context of the environment having an influence. For the case that the open system dynamics are fully controllable, it is shown that the control landscape for open systems can be lifted to the analysis of an equivalent auxiliary landscape of a closed composite system that contains the environmental interactions. This inherent connection can be analyzed to provide relevant information about the topology of the original open system landscape. Application to the optimization of an observable expectation value reveals the same landscape simplicity observed in former studies on closed systems. In particular, no false sub-optimal traps exist in the system control landscape when seeking to optimize an observable, even in the presence of complex environments. Moreover, a quantitative study of the control landscape of a system interacting with a thermal environment shows that the enhanced controllability attainable with open dynamics significantly broadens the range of the achievable observable values over the control landscape.