• In this paper we consider a parametric family of quadratically constrained quadratic programs (QCQP) and their associated semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations. Given a value of the parameters at which the SDP relaxation is exact, we study conditions (and quantitative bounds) under which the relaxation will continue to be exact as the parameter moves in a neighborhood around it. More generally, our results can be used to analyze SDP relaxations of polynomial optimization problems. Our framework captures several estimation problems such as low rank approximation, camera triangulation, rotation synchronization and approximate matrix completion. The SDP relaxation correctly solves these problems under noiseless observations, and our results guarantee that the relaxation will continue to solve them in the low noise regime.
  • In this paper we introduce a natural model for the realization space of a polytope up to projective equivalence which we call the slack realization space of the polytope. The model arises from the positive part of an algebraic variety determined by the slack ideal of the polytope. This is a saturated determinantal ideal that encodes the combinatorics of the polytope. We also derive a new model of the realization space of a polytope from the positive part of the variety of a related ideal. The slack ideal offers an effective computational framework for several classical questions about polytopes such as rational realizability, non-prescribability of faces, and realizability of combinatorial polytopes.
  • Efficient representations of convex sets are of crucial importance for many algorithms that work with them. It is well-known that sometimes, a complicated convex set can be expressed as the projection of a much simpler set in higher dimensions called a lift of the original set. This is a brief survey of recent developments in the topic of lifts of convex sets. Our focus will be on lifts that arise from affine slices of real positive semidefinite cones known as psd or spectrahedral lifts. The main result is that projection representations of a convex set are controlled by factorizations, through closed convex cones, of an operator that comes from the convex set. This leads to several research directions and results that lie at the intersection of convex geometry, combinatorics, real algebraic geometry, optimization, computer science and more.
  • Tur\'an problems in extremal combinatorics ask to find asymptotic bounds on the edge densities of graphs and hypergraphs that avoid specified subgraphs. The theory of flag algebras proposed by Razborov provides powerful methods based on semidefinite programming to find sums of squares that establish edge density inequalities in Tur\'an problems. Working with polynomial analogs of the flag algebra entities, we prove that such sums of squares created by flag algebras can be retrieved from a restricted version of the symmetry-adapted semidefinite program proposed by Gatermann and Parrilo. This involves using the representation theory of the symmetric group for finding succinct sums of squares expressions for invariant polynomials. The connection reveals several combinatorial and structural properties of flag algebra sums of squares, and offers new tools for Tur\'an and other related problems.
  • We consider the problem of finding sum of squares (sos) expressions to establish the non-negativity of a symmetric polynomial over a discrete hypercube whose coordinates are indexed by the $k$-element subsets of $[n]$. For simplicity, we focus on the case $k=2$, but our results extend naturally to all values of $k \geq 2$. We develop a variant of the Gatermann-Parrilo symmetry-reduction method tailored to our setting that allows for several simplifications and a connection to flag algebras. We show that every symmetric polynomial that has a sos expression of a fixed degree also has a succinct sos expression whose size depends only on the degree and not on the number of variables. Our method bypasses much of the technical difficulties needed to apply the Gatermann-Parrilo method, and offers flexibility in obtaining succinct sos expressions that are combinatorially meaningful. As a byproduct of our results, we arrive at a natural representation-theoretic justification for the concept of flags as introduced by Razborov in his flag algebra calculus. Furthermore, this connection exposes a family of non-negative polynomials that cannot be certified with any fixed set of flags, answering a question of Razborov in the context of our finite setting.
  • The positive semidefinite (psd) rank of a polytope is the size of the smallest psd cone that admits an affine slice that projects linearly onto the polytope. The psd rank of a d-polytope is at least d+1, and when equality holds we say that the polytope is psd-minimal. In this paper we develop new tools for the study of psd-minimality and use them to give a complete classification of psd-minimal 4-polytopes. The main tools introduced are trinomial obstructions, a new algebraic obstruction for psd-minimality, and the slack ideal of a polytope, which encodes the space of realizations of a polytope up to projective equivalence. Our central result is that there are 31 combinatorial classes of psd-minimal 4-polytopes. We provide combinatorial information and an explicit psd-minimal realization in each class. For 11 of these classes, every polytope in them is psd-minimal, and these are precisely the combinatorial classes of the known projectively unique 4-polytopes. We give a complete characterization of psd-minimality in the remaining classes, encountering in the process counterexamples to some open conjectures.
  • We show that the Euclidean distance degree of a real orthogonally invariant matrix variety equals the Euclidean distance degree of its restriction to diagonal matrices. We illustrate how this result can greatly simplify calculations in concrete circumstances.
  • This paper considers the foundational question of the existence of a fundamental (resp. essential) matrix given $m$ point correspondences in two views. We present a complete answer for the existence of fundamental matrices for any value of $m$. Using examples we disprove the widely held beliefs that fundamental matrices always exist whenever $m \leq 7$. At the same time, we prove that they exist unconditionally when $m \leq 5$. Under a mild genericity condition, we show that an essential matrix always exists when $m \leq 4$. We also characterize the six and seven point configurations in two views for which all matrices satisfying the epipolar constraint have rank at most one.
  • Minimizing the Euclidean distance to a set arises frequently in applications. When the set is algebraic, a measure of complexity of this optimization problem is its number of critical points. In this paper we provide a general framework to compute and count the real smooth critical points of a data matrix on an orthogonally invariant set of matrices. The technique relies on "transfer principles" that allow calculations to be done in the space of singular values of the matrices in the orthogonally invariant set. The calculations often simplify greatly and yield transparent formulas. We illustrate the method on several examples, and compare our results to the recently introduced notion of Euclidean distance degree of an algebraic variety.
  • The nearest point map of a real algebraic variety with respect to Euclidean distance is an algebraic function. For instance, for varieties of low rank matrices, the Eckart-Young Theorem states that this map is given by the singular value decomposition. This article develops a theory of such nearest point maps from the perspective of computational algebraic geometry. The Euclidean distance degree of a variety is the number of critical points of the squared distance to a generic point outside the variety. Focusing on varieties seen in applications, we present numerous tools for exact computations.
  • In this paper we show how to construct inner and outer convex approximations of a polytope from an approximate cone factorization of its slack matrix. This provides a robust generalization of the famous result of Yannakakis that polyhedral lifts of a polytope are controlled by (exact) nonnegative factorizations of its slack matrix. Our approximations behave well under polarity and have efficient representations using second order cones. We establish a direct relationship between the quality of the factorization and the quality of the approximations, and our results extend to generalized slack matrices that arise from a polytope contained in a polyhedron.
  • Given a set of point correspondences in two images, the existence of a fundamental matrix is a necessary condition for the points to be the images of a 3-dimensional scene imaged with two pinhole cameras. If the camera calibration is known then one requires the existence of an essential matrix. We present an efficient algorithm, using exact linear algebra, for testing the existence of a fundamental matrix. The input is any number of point correspondences. For essential matrices, we characterize the solvability of the Demazure polynomials. In both scenarios, we determine which linear subspaces intersect a fixed set defined by non-linear polynomials. The conditions we derive are polynomials stated purely in terms of image coordinates. They represent a new class of two-view invariants, free of fundamental (resp.~essential)~matrices.
  • Let M be a p-by-q matrix with nonnegative entries. The positive semidefinite rank (psd rank) of M is the smallest integer k for which there exist positive semidefinite matrices $A_i, B_j$ of size $k \times k$ such that $M_{ij} = \text{trace}(A_i B_j)$. The psd rank has many appealing geometric interpretations, including semidefinite representations of polyhedra and information-theoretic applications. In this paper we develop and survey the main mathematical properties of psd rank, including its geometry, relationships with other rank notions, and computational and algorithmic aspects.
  • This paper presents various worst-case results on the positive semidefinite (psd) rank of a nonnegative matrix, primarily in the context of polytopes. We prove that the psd rank of a generic n-dimensional polytope with v vertices is at least (nv)^(1/4) improving on previous lower bounds. For polygons with v vertices, we show that psd rank cannot exceed 4ceil(v/6) which in turn shows that the psd rank of a p by q matrix of rank three is at most 4ceil(min{p,q}/6). In general, a nonnegative matrix of rank (k+1 choose 2) has psd rank at least k and we pose the problem of deciding whether the psd rank is exactly k. Using geometry and bounds on quantifier elimination, we show that this decision can be made in polynomial time when k is fixed.
  • The positive semidefinite (psd) rank of a polytope is the smallest $k$ for which the cone of $k \times k$ real symmetric psd matrices admits an affine slice that projects onto the polytope. In this paper we show that the psd rank of a polytope is at least the dimension of the polytope plus one, and we characterize those polytopes whose psd rank equals this lower bound. We give several classes of polytopes that achieve the minimum possible psd rank including a complete characterization in dimensions two and three.
  • In this paper we characterize the slack matrices of cones and polytopes among all nonnegative matrices. This leads to an algorithm for deciding whether a given matrix is a slack matrix. The underlying decision problem is equivalent to the polyhedral verification problem whose complexity is unknown.
  • This article describes a method to compute successive convex approximations of the convex hull of a set of points in R^n that are the solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the reals. The method relies on sums of squares of polynomials and the dual theory of moment matrices. The main feature of the technique is that all computations are done modulo the ideal generated by the polynomials defining the set to the convexified. This work was motivated by questions raised by Lov\'asz concerning extensions of the theta body of a graph to arbitrary real algebraic varieties, and hence the relaxations described here are called theta bodies. The convexification process can be seen as an incarnation of Lasserre's hierarchy of convex relaxations of a semialgebraic set in R^n. When the defining ideal is real radical the results become especially nice. We provide several examples of the method and discuss convergence issues. Finite convergence, especially after the first step of the method, can be described explicitly for finite point sets.
  • We propose a variant of the Chvatal-Gomory procedure that will produce a sufficient set of facet normals for the integer hulls of all polyhedra {xx : Ax <= b} as b varies. The number of steps needed is called the small Chvatal rank (SCR) of A. We characterize matrices for which SCR is zero via the notion of supernormality which generalizes unimodularity. SCR is studied in the context of the stable set problem in a graph, and we show that many of the well-known facet normals of the stable set polytope appear in at most two rounds of our procedure. Our results reveal a uniform hypercyclic structure behind the normals of many complicated facet inequalities in the literature for the stable set polytope. Lower bounds for SCR are derived both in general and for polytopes in the unit cube.
  • Inspired by a question of Lov\'asz, we introduce a hierarchy of nested semidefinite relaxations of the convex hull of real solutions to an arbitrary polynomial ideal, called theta bodies of the ideal. For the stable set problem in a graph, the first theta body in this hierarchy is exactly Lov\'asz's theta body of the graph. We prove that theta bodies are, up to closure, a version of Lasserre's relaxations for real solutions to ideals, and that they can be computed explicitly using combinatorial moment matrices. Theta bodies provide a new canonical set of semidefinite relaxations for the max cut problem. For vanishing ideals of finite point sets, we give several equivalent characterizations of when the first theta body equals the convex hull of the points. We also determine the structure of the first theta body for all ideals.
  • In this paper we introduce several computational techniques for the study of moduli spaces of McKay quiver representations, making use of Groebner bases and toric geometry. For a finite abelian group G in GL(n,k), let Y_\theta be the coherent component of the moduli space of \theta-stable representations of the McKay quiver. Our two main results are as follows: we provide a simple description of the quiver representations corresponding to the torus orbits of Y_\theta, and, in the case where Y_\theta equals Nakamura's G-Hilbert scheme, we present explicit equations for a cover by local coordinate charts. The latter theorem corrects the first result from [Nakamura]. The techniques introduced here allow experimentation in this subject and give concrete algorithmic tools to tackle further open questions. To illustrate this point, we present an example of a nonnormal G-Hilbert scheme, thereby answering a question raised by Nakamura.
  • For a finite abelian group G in GL(n,k), we describe the coherent component Y_theta of the moduli space M_theta of theta-stable McKay quiver representations. This is a not-necessarily-normal toric variety that admits a projective birational morphism to A^n/G obtained by variation of GIT quotient. As a special case, this gives a new construction of Nakamura's G-Hilbert scheme that avoids the (typically highly singular) Hilbert scheme of |G|-points in A^n. To conclude, we describe the toric fan of Y_theta and hence calculate the quiver representation corresponding to any point of Y_theta.
  • This is a survey article on Gorenstein initial complexes of extensively studied ideals in commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. These include defining ideals of Segre and Veronese varieties, toric deformations of flag varieties known as Hibi ideals, determinantal ideals of generic matrices of indeterminates, and ideals generated by Pfaffians of generic skew symmetric matrices. We give a summary of recent work on the construction of squarefree Gorenstein initial ideals of these ideals when the ideals are themselves Gorenstein. We also present our own independent results for the Segre, Veronese, and some determinantal cases.
  • This paper presents algorithms for computing the Groebner fan of an arbitrary polynomial ideal. The computation involves enumeration of all reduced Groebner bases of the ideal. Our algorithms are based on a uniform definition of the Groebner fan that applies to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous ideals and a proof that this object is a polyhedral complex. We show that the cells of a Groebner fan can easily be oriented acyclically and with a unique sink, allowing their enumeration by the memory-less reverse search procedure. The significance of this follows from the fact that Groebner fans are not always normal fans of polyhedra in which case reverse search applies automatically. Computational results using our implementation of these algorithms in the software package Gfan are included.
  • The circuit ideal, $\ica$, of a configuration $\A = \{\a_1, ..., \a_n\} \subset \Z^d$ is the ideal generated by the binomials ${\x}^{\cc^+} - {\x}^{\cc^-} \in \k[x_1, ..., x_n]$ as $\cc = \cc^+ - \cc^- \in \Z^n$ varies over the circuits of $\A$. This ideal is contained in the toric ideal, $\ia$, of $\A$ which has numerous applications and is nontrivial to compute. Since circuits can be computed using linear algebra and the two ideals often coincide, it is worthwhile to understand when equality occurs. In this paper we study $\ica$ in relation to $\ia$ from various algebraic and combinatorial perspectives. We prove that the obstruction to equality of the ideals is the existence of certain polytopes. This result is based on a complete characterization of the standard pairs/associated primes of a monomial initial ideal of $\ica$ and their differences from those for the corresponding toric initial ideal. Eisenbud and Sturmfels proved that $\ia$ is the unique minimal prime of $\ica$ and that the embedded primes of $\ica$ are indexed by certain faces of the cone spanned by $\A$. We provide a necessary condition for a particular face to index an embedded prime and a partial converse. Finally, we compare various polyhedral fans associated to $\ia$ and $\ica$. The Gr\"obner fan of $\ica$ is shown to refine that of $\ia$ when the codimension of the ideals is at most two.
  • A short new proof of the fact that all shifted complexes are fixed by reverse lexicographic shifting is given. A notion of lexicographic shifting, $\Delta_{\lex}$ -- an operation that transforms a monomial ideal of $S=\field[x_i: i\in\N]$ that is finitely generated in each degree into a squarefree strongly stable ideal -- is defined and studied. It is proved that (in contrast to the reverse lexicographic case) a squarefree strongly stable ideal $I\subset S$ is fixed by lexicographic shifting if and only if $I$ is a universal squarefree lexsegment ideal (abbreviated USLI) of $S$. Moreover, in the case when $I$ is finitely generated and is not a USLI, it is verified that all the ideals in the sequence $\{\Delta_{\lex}^i(I)\}_{i=0}^{\infty}$ are distinct. The limit ideal $\bar{\Delta}(I)=\lim_{i\to\infty}\Delta_{\lex}^i(I)$ is well defined and is a USLI that depends only on a certain analog of the Hilbert function of $I$.