• Light microscopy as well as image acquisition and processing suffer from physical and technical prejudices which preclude a correct interpretation of biological observations which can be reflected in, e.g., medical and pharmacological praxis. Using the examples of a diffracting microbead and fluorescently labelled tissue, this article clarifies some ignored aspects of image build-up in the light microscope and introduce algorithms for maximal extraction of information from the 3D microscopic experiments. We provided a correct set-up of the microscope and we sought a voxel (3D pixel) called an electromagnetic centroid which localizes the information about the object. In diffraction imaging and light emission, this voxel shows a minimal intensity change in two consecutive optical cuts. This approach further enabled us to identify z-stack of a DAPI-stained tissue section where at least one object of a relevant fluorescent marker was in focus. The spatial corrections (overlaps) of the DAPI-labelled region with in-focus autofluorescent regions then enabled us to co-localize these three regions in the optimal way when considering physical laws and information theory. We demonstrate that superresolution down to the Nobelish level can be obtained from commonplace widefield bright-field and fluorescence microscopy and bring new perspectives on co-localization in fluorescent microscopy.
  • The article outlines in memoriam Prof. Pavel Zampa's concepts of system theory which enable to devise a measurement in dynamic systems independently of the particular system behaviour. From the point of view of Zampa's theory, terms like system time, system attributes, system link, system element, input, output, subsystems, and state variables are defined. In Conclusions, Zampa's theory is discussed together with another mathematical approaches of qualitative dynamics known since the 19th century. In Appendices, we present applications of Zampa's technical approach to measurement of complex dynamical (chemical and biological) systems at the Institute of Complex Systems, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice.
  • We introduce novel information-entropic variables -- a Point Divergence Gain (${\Omega}^{(l \rightarrow m)}_\alpha$), a Point Divergence Gain Entropy ($I_\alpha$), and a Point Divergence Gain Entropy Density ($P_\alpha$) -- which are derived from the R\'{e}nyi entropy and describe spatio-temporal changes between two consecutive discrete multidimensional distributions. The behavior of ${\Omega}^{(l \rightarrow m)}_\alpha$ is simulated for typical distributions and, together with $I_\alpha$ and $P_\alpha$, applied in analysis and characterization of series of multidimensional datasets of computer-based and real images.
  • In this paper, we introduce a novel - physico-chemical - approach for calibration of a digital camera chip. This approach utilizes results of measurement of incident light spectra of calibration films of different levels of gray for construction of calibration curve (number of incident photons vs. image pixel intensity) for each camera pixel. We show spectral characteristics of such corrected digital raw image files (a primary camera signal) and demonstrate their suitability for next image processing and analysis.
  • This article presents an algorithm for the evaluation of organelles' movements inside of an unmodified live cell. We used a time-lapse image series obtained using wide-field bright-field photon transmission microscopy as an algorithm input. The benefit of the algorithm is the application of the R\'enyi information entropy, namely a variable called a point information gain, which enables to highlight the borders of the intracellular organelles and to localize the organelles' centers of mass with the precision of one pixel.
  • The article demonstrates some less known principles of image build-up in diffractive microscopy and their usage in analysis unravelling the smallest localized information about the original object - an electromagnetic centroid. In fluorescence, the electromagnetic centroid is naturally at the position of the fluorophore. The usage of an information-entropic variable - a point divergence gain - is demonstrated for finding the most localized position of the object's representation, generally of the size of a voxel (3D pixel). These spatial pixels can be qualitatively classified and used for reconstruction of the 3D structures with precision comparable with electron microscopy.
  • We generalize the Point information gain (PIG) and derived quantities, i.e. Point information entropy (PIE) and Point information entropy density (PIED), for the case of R\'enyi entropy and simulate the behavior of PIG for typical distributions. We also use these methods for the analysis of multidimensional datasets. We demonstrate the main properties of PIE/PIED spectra for the real data on the example of several images, and discuss possible further utilization in other fields of data processing.
  • Current biological and medical research is aimed at obtaining a detailed spatiotemporal map of a live cell's interior to describe and predict cell's physiological state. We present here an algorithm for complete 3-D modelling of cellular structures from a z-stack of images obtained using label-free wide-field bright-field light-transmitted microscopy. The method visualizes 3-D objects with a volume equivalent to the area of a camera pixel multiplied by the z-height. The computation is based on finding pixels of unchanged intensities between two consecutive images of an object spread function. These pixels represent strongly light-diffracting, light-absorbing, or light-emitting objects. To accomplish this, variables derived from R\'{e}nyi entropy are used to suppress camera noise. Using this algorithm, the detection limit of objects is only limited by the technical specifications of the microscope setup--we achieve the detection of objects of the size of one camera pixel. This method allows us to obtain 3-D reconstructions of cells from bright-field microscopy images that are comparable in quality to those from electron microscopy images.
  • One of the simplest multilevel cellular automata - the hodgepodge machine - was modified to best match the chemical trajectory observed in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. Noise introduces watersheding of the central regular pattern into the circular target pattern. This article analyzes influences of the neighborhood and internal excitation kinds of noise. We have found that configurations of ignition points, which give circular waves - target patterns, occur only in the interval of the neighborhood excitation noise from 30% to 34% and at the internal excitation noise of 12%. Noisy hodgepodge machine with these parameters is the best approximation to the experimental Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.
  • The article describes results of the modified model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which resembles rather well the limit set observed upon experimental performance of the reaction in the Petri dish. We discuss the concept of the ignition of circular waves and show that only the asymmetrical ignition leads to the formation of spiral structures. From the qualitative assumptions on the behavior of dynamic systems, we conclude that the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction likely forms a regular grid.
  • Mesoscopic dynamics of self-organized structures is the most important aspect in the description of complex living systems. The Belousov--Zhabotinsky (B--Z) reaction is in this respect a convenient testbed because it represents a prototype of chemical self-organization with a rich variety of emergent wave-spiral patterns. Using a multi-state stochastic hotchpotch model, we show here that the mesoscopic behaviour of the non-stirred B--Z reaction is both qualitatively and quantitatively susceptible to the description in terms of stochastic multilevel cellular automata. This further implies that the mesoscopic dynamics of the non-stirred B--Z reaction results from a delicate interplay between a) a maximal number of available states within the elementary time lag (i.e. a minimal time interval needed for demise of a final state) and b) an imprecision or uncertainty in the definition of state. If either the number of time lags is largely different from 7 or the maximal number of available states is smaller than 20, the physicochemical conditions are inappropriate for a formation of the wave-spiral patterns. Furthermore, a white noise seems to be key for the formation of circular structures (target patterns) which could not be as yet systematically explained in existing models.
  • The model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, so-called hodgepodge machine, is discussed in detail and compared with the experimentally determined system trajectory. We show that many of the features observed in the experiment may be found at different internal excitation growth rates, the g/maxState ratios. The g/maxState ratio determines the structure of the limit set and defines also details of the system state-space trajectory. While the limit set identical to the experiment and the model may be found, there is not a single g/maxState level which defines the trajectory identical to the experiment. We also propose that there is an inherent experimental time unit defined by the time extent of the bottleneck chemical reaction process which defines the g/maxState ratio and the spatial element of the process.
  • Measurement in biological systems became a subject of concern as a consequence of numerous reports on limited reproducibility of experimental results. To reveal origins of this inconsistency, we have examined general features of biological systems as dynamical systems far from not only their chemical equilibrium, but, in most cases, also of their Lyapunov stable states. Thus, in biological experiments, we do not observe states, but distinct trajectories followed by the examined organism. If one of the possible sequences is selected, a minute sub-section of the whole problem is obtained, sometimes in a seemingly highly reproducible manner. But the state of the organism is known only if a complete set of possible trajectories is known. And this is often practically impossible. Therefore, we propose a different framework for reporting and analysis of biological experiments, respecting the view of non-linear mathematics. This view should be used to avoid overoptimistic results, which have to be consequently retracted or largely complemented. An increase of specification of experimental procedures is the way for better understanding of the scope of paths, which the biological system may be evolving. And it is hidden in the evolution of experimental protocols.