• Distances and extinction values are usually degenerate. To refine the distance to the general Galactic Center region, a carefully determined extinction law (taking into account the prevailing systematic errors) is urgently needed. We collected data for 55 classical Cepheids projected toward the Galactic Center region to derive the near- to mid-infrared extinction law using three different approaches. The relative extinction values obtained are AJ/AKs = 3.005, AH/AKs = 1.717, A[3.6]/AKs = 0.478, A[4.5]/AKs = 0.341, A[5.8]/AKs = 0.234, A[8.0]/AKs = 0.321, AW1/AKs = 0.506, and AW2/AKs = 0.340. We also calculated the corresponding systematic errors. Compared with previous work, we report an extremely low and steep mid-infrared extinction law. Using a seven-passband 'optimal distance' method, we improve the mean distance precision to our sample of 55 Cepheids to 4%. Based on four confirmed Galactic Center Cepheids, a solar Galactocentric distance of R_0 = 8.10\pm0.19\pm0.22 kpc is determined, featuring an uncertainty that is close to the limiting distance accuracy (2.8%) for Galactic Center Cepheids.
  • Here we discuss impacts of distance determinations on the Galactic disk traced by relatively young objects. The Galactic disk, about 40 kpc in diameter, is a cross-road of studies on the methods of measuring distances, interstellar extinction, evolution of galaxies, and other subjects of interest in astronomy. A proper treatment of interstellar extinction is, for example, crucial for estimating distances to stars in the disk outside the small range of the solar neighborhood. We'll review the current status of relevant studies and discuss some new approaches to the extinction law. When the extinction law is reasonably constrained, distance indicators found in today and future surveys are telling us stellar distribution and more throughout the Galactic disk. Among several useful distance indicators, the focus of this review is Cepheids and open clusters (especially contact binaries in clusters). These tracers are particularly useful for addressing the metallicity gradient of the Galactic disk, an important feature for which comparison between observations and theoretical models can reveal the evolutionary of the disk.
  • Recent discoveries of bimodal main sequences (MSs) associated with young clusters (with ages $\lesssim 1$ Gyr) in the Magellanic Clouds have drawn a lot of attention. One of the prevailing formation scenarios attributes these split MSs to a bimodal distribution in stellar rotation rates, with most stars belonging to a rapidly rotating population. In this scenario, only a small fraction of stars populating a secondary blue sequence are slowly or non-rotating stars. Here, we focus on the blue MS in the young cluster NGC 1850. We compare the cumulative number fraction of the observed blue-MS stars to that of the high-mass-ratio binary systems at different radii. The cumulative distributions of both populations exhibit a clear anti-correlation, characterized by a highly significant Pearson coefficient of $-0.97$. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that blue-MS stars are low-mass-ratio binaries, and therefore their dynamical disruption is still ongoing. High-mass-ratio binaries, on the other hand, are more centrally concentrated.
  • In this paper we report a clustering analysis of upper main-sequence stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, using data from the VMC survey (the VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic system). Young stellar structures are identified as surface overdensities on a range of significance levels. They are found to be organized in a hierarchical pattern, such that larger structures at lower significance levels contain smaller ones at higher significance levels. They have very irregular morphologies, with a perimeter-area dimension of 1.44 +/- 0.02 for their projected boundaries. They have a power-law mass-size relation, power-law size/mass distributions, and a lognormal surface density distribution. We derive a projected fractal dimension of 1.48 +/- 0.03 from the mass-size relation, or of 1.4 +/- 0.1 from the size distribution, reflecting significant lumpiness of the young stellar structures. These properties are remarkably similar to those of a turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), supporting a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by supersonic turbulence.
  • Nuclear rings are excellent laboratories for probing diverse phenomena such as the formation and evolution of young massive star clusters (YMCs), nuclear starbursts, as well as the secular evolution and dynamics of their host galaxies. We have compiled a sample of 17 galaxies with nuclear rings, which are well resolved by high-resolution {\sl Hubble} and {\sl Spitzer Space Telescope} imaging. For each nuclear ring, we identified the ring star cluster population, along with their physical properties (ages, masses, extinction values). We also determined the integrated ring properties, including the average age, total stellar mass, and current star-formation rate (SFR). We find that Sb-type galaxies tend to have the highest ring stellar mass fraction with respect to the host galaxy, and this parameter is correlated with the ring's SFR surface density. The ring SFRs are correlated with their stellar masses, which is reminiscent of the main sequence of star-forming galaxies. There are striking correlations between star-forming properties (i.e., SFR and SFR surface density) and non-axisymmetric bar parameters, appearing to confirm previous inferences that strongly barred galaxies tend to have lower ring SFRs, although the ring star-formation histories turn out to be significantly more complicated. Nuclear rings with higher stellar masses tend to be associated with lower cluster mass fractions, but there is no such relation with the ages of the rings. The two youngest nuclear rings in our sample, NGC 1512 and NGC 4314, which have the most extreme physical properties, represent the young extremity of the nuclear ring age distribution.
  • Bifurcated patterns of blue straggler stars in their color--magnitude diagrams have atracted significant attention. This type of special (but rare) pattern of two distinct blue straggler sequences is commonly interpreted as evidence of cluster core-collapse-driven stellar collisions as an efficient formation mechanism. Here, we report the detection of a bifurcated blue straggler distribution in a young Large MagellanicCloud cluster, NGC 2173. Because of the cluster's low central stellar number density and its young age, dynamical analysis shows that stellar collisions alone cannot explain the observed blue straggler stars. Therefore, binary evolution is instead the most viable explanation of the origin of these blue straggler stars. However, the reason why binary evolution would render the color--magnitude distribution of blue straggler stars bifurcated remains unclear.
  • We have analyzed multi-passband photometric observations, obtained with the {\it Hubble Space Telescope}, of the massive ($1.8 \times 10^5 M_\odot$), intermediate-age (1.8 Gyr-old) Large Magellanic Cloud star cluster NGC 1783. The morphology of the cluster's red giant branch does not exhibit a clear broadening beyond its intrinsic width; the observed width is consistent with that owing to photometric uncertainties alone and independent of our photometric selection boundaries applied to obtain our sample of red-giant stars. The color dispersion of the cluster's red-giant stars around the best-fitting ridgeline is $0.062 \pm 0.009$ mag, which is equivalent to the width of $0.080 \pm 0.001$ mag derived from artificial simple stellar population tests, that is, tests based on single-age, single-metallicity stellar populations. NGC 1783 is comparably massive as other star clusters that show clear evidence of multiple stellar populations. After incorporating mass-loss recipes from its current age of 1.8 Gyr to an age of 6 Gyr, NGC 1783 is expected to remain as massive as some other clusters that host clear multiple populations at these intermediate ages. If we were to assume that mass is an important driver of multiple population formation, then NGC 1783 should have exhibited clear evidence of chemical abundance variations. However, our results support the absence of any chemical abundance variations in NGC 1783.
  • Classical Cepheids are well-known and widely used distance indicators. As distance and extinction are usually degenerate, it is important to develop suitable methods to robustly anchor the distance scale. Here, we introduce a near-infrared (near-IR) optimal distance method to determine both the extinction values of and distances to a large sample of 288 Galactic classical Cepheids. The overall uncertainty in the derived distances is less than 4.9%. We compare our newly determined distances to the Cepheids in our sample with previously published distances to the same Cepheids with Hubble Space Telescope parallax measurements and distances based on the IR surface brightness method, Wesenheit functions, and the main-sequence fitting method. The systematic deviations in the distances determined here with respect to those of previous publications is less than 1-2%. Hence, we constructed Galactic mid-IR period-luminosity (PL) relations for classical Cepheids in the four Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) bands (W1, W2, W3, and W4) and the four Spitzer Space Telescope bands ([3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0]). Based on our sample of hundreds of Cepheids, the WISE PL relations have been determined for the first time; their dispersion is approximately 0.10 mag. Using the currently most complete sample, our Spitzer PL relations represent a significant improvement in accuracy, especially in the [3.6] band which has the smallest dispersion (0.066 mag). In addition, the average mid-IR extinction curve for Cepheids has been obtained: A_W1/A_Ks=0.560, A_W2/A_Ks=0.479, A_W3/A_Ks=0.507, A_W4/A_Ks=0.406, A_[3.6]/A_Ks=0.481, A_[4.5]/A_Ks=0.469, A_[5.8]/A_Ks=0.427, and A_[8.0]/A_Ks=0.427 mag.
  • We re-examine the properties of the star cluster population in the circumnuclear starburst ring in the face-on spiral galaxy NGC 7742, whose young cluster mass function has been reported to exhibit significant deviations from the canonical power law. We base our reassessment on the clusters' luminosities (an observational quantity) rather than their masses (a derived quantity), and confirm conclusively that the galaxy's starburst-ring clusters---and particularly the youngest subsample, $\log(t \mbox{ yr}^{-1}) \le 7.2$---show evidence of a turnover in the cluster luminosity function well above the 90\% completeness limit adopted to ensure the reliability of our results. This confirmation emphasises the unique conundrum posed by this unusual cluster population.
  • Around the turn of the last century, star clusters of all kinds were considered "simple" stellar populations. Over the past decade, this situation has changed dramatically. At the same time, star clusters are among the brightest stellar population components and, as such, they are visible out to much greater distances than individual stars, even the brightest, so that understanding the intricacies of star cluster composition and their evolution is imperative for understanding stellar populations and the evolution of galaxies as a whole. In this review of where the field has moved to in recent years, we place particular emphasis on the properties and importance of binary systems, the effects of rapid stellar rotation, and the presence of multiple populations in Magellanic Cloud star clusters across the full age range. Our most recent results imply a reverse paradigm shift, back to the old simple stellar population picture for at least some intermediate-age (~1--3 Gyr-old) star clusters, opening up exciting avenues for future research efforts.
  • Star formation is a hierarchical process, forming young stellar structures of star clusters, associations, and complexes over a wide scale range. The star-forming complex in the bar region of the Large Magellanic Cloud is investigated with upper main-sequence stars observed by the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. The upper main-sequence stars exhibit highly non-uniform distributions. Young stellar structures inside the complex are identified from the stellar density map as density enhancements of different significance levels. We find that these structures are hierarchically organized such that larger, lower-density structures contain one or several smaller, higher-density ones. They follow power-law size and mass distributions as well as a lognormal surface density distribution. All these results support a scenario of hierarchical star formation regulated by turbulence. The temporal evolution of young stellar structures is explored by using subsamples of upper main-sequence stars with different magnitude and age ranges. While the youngest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~7.2, contains most substructure, progressively older ones are less and less substructured. The oldest subsample, with a median age of log($\tau$/yr)~=~8.0, is almost indistinguishable from a uniform distribution on spatial scales of 30--300~pc, suggesting that the young stellar structures are completely dispersed on a timescale of $\sim$100~Myr. These results are consistent with the characteristics of the 30~Doradus complex and the entire Large Magellanic Cloud, suggesting no significant environmental effects. We further point out that the fractal dimension may be method-dependent for stellar samples with significant age spreads.
  • Understanding the effects of dust extinction is important to properly interpret observations. The optical total-to-selective extinction ratio, Rv = Av/E(B-V), is widely used to describe extinction variations in ultraviolet and optical bands. Since the Rv=3.1 extinction curve adequately represents the average extinction law of diffuse regions in the Milky Way, it is commonly used to correct observational measurements along sightlines toward diffuse regions in the interstellar medium. However, the Rv value may vary even along different diffuse interstellar medium sightlines. In this paper, we investigate the optical--mid-infrared (mid-IR) extinction law toward a very diffuse region at l = 165 in the Galactic plane, which was selected based on a CO emission map. Adopting red clump stars as extinction tracers, we determine the optical-to-mid-IR extinction law for our diffuse region in the two APASS bands (B, V), the three XSTPS-GAC bands (g, r, i), the three 2MASS bands (J, H, Ks, and the two WISE bands (W1, W2). Specifically, 18 red clump stars were selected from the APOGEE--RC catalog based on spectroscopic data in order to explore the diversity of the extinction law. We find that the optical extinction curves exhibit appreciable diversity. The corresponding Rv ranges from 1.7 to 3.8, while the mean Rv value of 2.8 is consistent with the widely adopted average value of 3.1 for Galactic diffuse clouds. There is no apparent correlation between Rv value and color excess E(B-V) in the range of interest, from 0.2 to 0.6 mag, or with specific visual extinction per kiloparsec, AV/d.
  • As part of on an extensive data mining effort, we have compiled a database of 162 Galactic rotation speed measurements at $R_0$ (the solar Galactocentric distance), $\Theta_0$. Published between 1927 and 2017 June, this represents the most comprehensive set of $\Theta_0$ values since the 1985 meta analysis that led to the last revision of the International Astronomical Union's recommended Galactic rotation constants. Although we do not find any compelling evidence of the presence of `publication bias' in recent decades, we find clear differences among the $\Theta_0$ values and the $\Theta_0/R_0$ ratios resulting from the use of different tracer populations. Specifically, young tracers (including OB and supergiant stars, masers, Cepheid variables, H{\sc ii} regions, and young open clusters), as well as kinematic measurements of Sgr A* near the Galactic Center, imply a significantly larger Galactic rotation speed at the solar circle and a higher $\Theta_0/R_0$ ratio (i.e., $\Theta_0 = 247 \pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$ and $\Theta_0/R_0 = 29.81 \pm 0.32$ km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$; statistical uncertainties only) than any of the tracers dominating the Galaxy's mass budget (i.e., field stars and the H{\sc i}/CO distributions). Using the latter as most representative of the bulk of the Galaxy's matter distribution, we arrive at an updated set of Galactic rotation constants, $\Theta_0 = 225 \pm 3 \mbox{ (statistical)} \pm 10 \mbox{ (systematic) km s}^{-1}$, $R_0 = 8.3 \pm 0.2 \mbox{ (statistical)} \pm 0.4 \mbox{ (systematic) kpc}$, and $\Theta_0 / R_0 = 27.12 \pm 0.39 \mbox{ (statistical)} \pm 1.78 \mbox{ (systematic) km s}^{-1} \mbox{ kpc}^{-1}$.
  • Based on an extensive spectral study of a photometrically confirmed sample of Mira variables, we find a relationship between relative Balmer emission-line strength and spectral temperature of O-rich Mira stars. The $F_{\rm H\delta}/F_{\rm H\gamma}$ flux ratio increases from less than unity to five as stars cool down from M0 to M10, which is likely driven by increasing TiO absorption above the deepest shock-emitting regions. We also discuss the relationship between the equivalent widths of the Balmer emission lines and the photometric luminosity phase of our Mira sample stars. Using our 291 Mira spectra as templates for reference, 191 Mira candidates are newly identified from the LAMOST DR4 catalog. We summarize the criteria adopted to select Mira candidates based on emission-line indices and molecular absorption bands. This enlarged spectral sample of Mira variables has the potential to contribute significantly to our knowledge of the optical properties of Mira stars and will facilitate further studies of these late-type, long-period variables.
  • The "VISTA near-infrared YJKs survey of the Magellanic System" (VMC) is collecting deep Ks-band time-series photometry of pulsating stars hosted by the two Magellanic Clouds and their connecting Bridge. Here we present YJKs light curves for a sample of 717 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) Classical Cepheids (CCs). These data, complemented with our previous results and V magnitude from literature, allowed us to construct a variety of period-luminosity and period-Wesenheit relationships, valid for Fundamental, First and Second Overtone pulsators. These relations provide accurate individual distances to CCs in the SMC over an area of more than 40 sq. deg. Adopting literature relations, we estimated ages and metallicities for the majority of the investigated pulsators, finding that: i) the age distribution is bimodal, with two peaks at 120+-10 and 220+-10 Myr; ii) the more metal-rich CCs appear to be located closer to the centre of the galaxy. Our results show that the three-dimensional distribution of the CCs in the SMC, is not planar but heavily elongated for more than 25-30 kpc approximately in the east/north-east towards south-west direction. The young and old CCs in the SMC show a different geometric distribution. Our data support the current theoretical scenario predicting a close encounter or a direct collision between the Clouds some 200 Myr ago and confirm the presence of a Counter-Bridge predicted by some models. The high precision three-dimensional distribution of young stars presented in this paper provides a new testbed for future models exploring the formation and evolution of the Magellanic System.
  • Numerical simulations were carried out to study the origin of multiple stellar populations in the intermediate-age clusters NGC 411 and NGC 1806 in the Magellanic Clouds. We performed NBODY6++ simulations based on two different formation scenarios, an ad hoc formation model where second-generation (SG) stars are formed inside a cluster of first-generation (FG) stars using the gas accumulated from the external intergalactic medium and a minor merger model of unequal mass ($M_{SG}$/$M_{FG}$ ~5-10%) clusters with an age difference of a few hundred million years. We compared our results such as the radial profile of the SG-to-FG number ratio with observations on the assumption that the SG stars in the observations are composed of cluster members, and confirmed that both the ad hoc formation and merger scenarios reproduce the observed radial trend of the SG-to-FG number ratio which shows less centrally concentrated SG than FG stars. It is difficult to constrain the formation scenario for the multiple populations by only using the spatial distribution of the SG stars. SG stars originating from the merger scenario show a significant velocity anisotropy and rotational features compared to those from the ad hoc formation scenario. Thus, observations aimed at kinematic properties like velocity anisotropy or rotational velocities for SG stars should be obtained to better understand the formation of the multiple populations in these clusters. This is, however, beyond current instrumentation capabilities.
  • Accurate astronomical distance determination is crucial for all fields in astrophysics, from Galactic to cosmological scales. Despite, or perhaps because of, significant efforts to determine accurate distances, using a wide range of methods, tracers, and techniques, an internally consistent astronomical distance framework has not yet been established. We review current efforts to homogenize the Local Group's distance framework, with particular emphasis on the potential of RR Lyrae stars as distance indicators, and attempt to extend this in an internally consistent manner to cosmological distances. Calibration based on Type Ia supernovae and distance determinations based on gravitational lensing represent particularly promising approaches. We provide a positive outlook to improvements to the status quo expected from future surveys, missions, and facilities. Astronomical distance determination has clearly reached maturity and near-consistency.
  • An increasing number of young massive clusters (YMCs) in the Magellanic Clouds have been found to exhibit bimodal or extended main sequences (MSs) in their color--magnitude diagrams (CMDs). These features are usually interpreted in terms of a coeval stellar population with different stellar rotational rates, where the blue and red MS stars are populated by non- (or slowly) and rapidly rotating stellar populations, respectively. However, some studies have shown that an age spread of several million years is required to reproduce the observed wide turn-off regions in some YMCs. Here we present the ultraviolet--visual CMDs of four Large and Small Magellanic Cloud YMCs, NGC 330, NGC 1805, NGC 1818, and NGC 2164, based on high-precision Hubble Space Telescope photometry. We show that they all exhibit extended main-sequence turn-offs (MSTOs). The importance of age spreads and stellar rotation in reproducing the observations is investigated. The observed extended MSTOs cannot be explained by stellar rotation alone. Adopting an age spread of 35--50 Myr can alleviate this difficulty. We conclude that stars in these clusters are characterized by ranges in both their ages and rotation properties, but the origin of the age spread in these clusters remains unknown.
  • The integrated properties of nuclear rings are correlated with their host galaxy's secular evolution and its dynamics, as well as with the formation and evolution of the ring's star cluster population(s). Here we present a new method to accurately measure the spectral energy distribution and current star-formation rate (SFR) of the nuclear ring in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1512 based on high-resolution {\sl Hubble} and {\sl Spitzer Space Telescope} images. Image degradation does not have a significant negative effect on the robustness of the results. To obtain the ring's SFR for the period spanning $\sim$3--10 Myr, we apply our method to the continuum-subtracted H$\alpha$ and 8 $\mu$m images. The resulting SFR surface density, $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$=$0.09\, {M}_{\odot} \,{\rm yr}^{-1}$ ${\rm kpc}^{-2}$, which is much higher than the disk-averaged SFR densities in normal galaxies. We also estimate the ring's total stellar mass, log (${M}/{M}_{\odot}$) = 7.1 $\pm$ 0.11 for an average age of $\sim$40 Myr.
  • In 1626, the Venetian physician Santorio Santorio published the details of his pulsilogium, a stop clock that could accurately measure one's pulse rate. He applied Galileo Galilei's insights that the frequency of a pendulum's oscillation is inversely proportional to the square root of its length. Santorio's inventions emerged at a time when the natural world and our solar system were beginning to be mapped in remarkable detail. Santorio was a true representative of his era, a period in which scientific developments came in rapid succession and measurements to support hypotheses became the norm.
  • We study the luminosity function of intermediate-age red-clump stars using deep, near-infrared photometric data covering $\sim$ 20 deg$^2$ located throughout the central part of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), comprising the main body and the galaxy's eastern wing, based on observations obtained with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds (VMC). We identified regions which show a foreground population ($\sim$11.8 $\pm$ 2.0 kpc in front of the main body) in the form of a distance bimodality in the red-clump distribution. The most likely explanation for the origin of this feature is tidal stripping from the SMC rather than the extended stellar haloes of the Magellanic Clouds and/or tidally stripped stars from the Large Magellanic Cloud. The homogeneous and continuous VMC data trace this feature in the direction of the Magellanic Bridge and, particularly, identify (for the first time) the inner region ($\sim$ 2 -- 2.5 kpc from the centre) from where the signatures of interactions start becoming evident. This result provides observational evidence of the formation of the Magellanic Bridge from tidally stripped material from the SMC.
  • The heated debate on the importance of stellar rotation and age spreads in massive star clusters has just become hotter by throwing stellar variability into the mix.
  • We present the results of the chi2 minimization model fitting technique applied to optical and near-infrared photometric and radial velocity data for a sample of 9 fundamental and 3 first overtone classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The near- infrared photometry (JK filters) was obtained by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey "VISTA near-infrared Y; J;Ks survey of the Magellanic Clouds system"(VMC). For each pulsator isoperiodic model sequences have been computed by adopting a nonlinear convective hydrodynamical code in order to reproduce the multi- filter light and (when available) radial velocity curve amplitudes and morphological details. The inferred individual distances provide an intrinsic mean value for the SMC distance modulus of 19.01 mag and a standard deviation of 0.08 mag, in agreement with the literature. Moreover the instrinsic masses and luminosities of the best fitting model show that all these pulsators are brighter than the canonical evolutionary Mass- Luminosity relation (MLR), suggesting a significant efficiency of core overshooting and/or mass loss. Assuming that the inferred deviation from the canonical MLR is only due to mass loss, we derive the expected distribution of percentage mass loss as a function of both the pulsation period and of the canonical stellar mass. Finally, a good agreement is found between the predicted mean radii and current Period-Radius (PR) relations in the SMC available in the literature. The results of this investigation support the predictive capabilities of the adopted theoretical scenario and pave the way to the application to other extensive databases at various chemical compositions, including the VMC Large Magellanic Cloud pulsators and Galactic Cepheids with Gaia parallaxes.
  • We used the 50 cm Binocular Network (50BiN) telescope at Delingha Station (Qinghai Province) of Purple Mountain Observatory (Chinese Academy of Sciences) to obtain simultaneous $V$- and $R$-band observations of the old open cluster NGC 188. Our aim was a search for populations of variable stars. We derived light-curve solutions for six W Ursae Majoris (W UMa) eclipsing-binary systems and estimated their orbital parameters. The resulting distance to the W UMas is independent of the physical characteristics of the host cluster. We next determined the current best period--luminosity relations for contact binaries (CBs; scatter $\sigma < 0.10$ mag). We conclude that CBs can be used as distance tracers with better than 5\% uncertainty. We apply our new relations to the 102 CBs in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which yields a distance modulus of $(m-M_V)_0=18.41\pm0.20$ mag.
  • We study the hierarchical stellar structures in a $\sim$1.5 deg$^2$ area covering the 30 Doradus-N158-N159-N160 star-forming complex with the VISTA Survey of the Magellanic Clouds. Based on the young upper main-sequence stars, we find that the surface densities cover a wide range of values, from log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\lesssim$ $-$2.0 to log($\Sigma\cdot$pc$^2$) $\gtrsim$ 0.0. Their distributions are highly non-uniform, showing groups that frequently have sub-groups inside. The sizes of the stellar groups do not exhibit characteristic values, and range continuously from several parsecs to more than 100 pc; the cumulative size distribution can be well described by a single power law, with the power-law index indicating a projected fractal dimension $D_2$ = 1.6 $\pm$ 0.3. We suggest that the phenomena revealed here support a scenario of hierarchical star formation. Comparisons with other star-forming regions and galaxies are also discussed.