• Epitaxy forms the basis of modern electronics and optoelectronics. We report coherent atomically-thin superlattices, in which different transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers--despite large lattice mismatches--are repeated and integrated without dislocations. Grown by a novel omnidirectional epitaxy, these superlattices display fully-matched lattice constants across heterointerfaces while maintaining a surprisingly isotropic lattice structure and triangular symmetry. This strong epitaxial strain is precisely engineered via the nanoscale supercell dimensions, thereby enabling broad tuning of the optical properties and producing photoluminescence peak shifts as large as 250 meV. We present theoretical models to explain this coherent growth as well as the energetic interplay governing the flat-rippled configuration space in these strained monolayers. Such coherent superlattices provide novel building blocks with targeted functionalities at the atomically-thin monolayer limit.
  • Interatomic pairwise methods are currently among the most popular and accurate ways to include dispersion energy in density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, when applied to more than two atoms, these methods are still frequently perceived to be based on \textit{ad hoc} assumptions, rather than a rigorous derivation from quantum mechanics. Starting from the adiabatic connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, an exact expression for the electronic exchange-correlation energy, we demonstrate that the pairwise interatomic dispersion energy for an arbitrary collection of isotropic polarizable dipoles emerges from the second-order expansion of the ACFD formula. Moreover, for a system of quantum harmonic oscillators coupled through a dipole--dipole potential, we prove the equivalence between the full interaction energy obtained from the Hamiltonian diagonalization and the ACFD correlation energy in the random-phase approximation. This property makes the Hamiltonian diagonalization an efficient method for the calculation of the many-body dispersion energy. In addition, we show that the switching function used to damp the dispersion interaction at short distances arises from a short-range screened Coulomb potential, whose role is to account for the spatial spread of the individual atomic dipole moments. By using the ACFD formula we gain a deeper understanding of the approximations made in the interatomic pairwise approaches, providing a powerful formalism for further development of accurate and efficient methods for the calculation of the dispersion energy.