• We study solitary wave propagation in 1D granular crystals with Hertz-like interaction potentials. We consider interfaces between media with different exponents in the interaction potential. For an interface with increasing interaction potential exponent along the propagation direction we obtain mainly transmission with delayed secondary transmitted and reflected pulses. For interfaces with decreasing interaction potential exponent we observe both significant reflection and transmission of the solitary wave, where the transmitted part of the wave forms a multipulse structure. We also investigate impurities consisting of beads with different interaction exponents compared to the media they are embedded in, and we find that the impurities cause both reflection and transmission, including the formation of multipulse structures, independent of whether the exponent in the impurities is smaller than in the surrounding media. We explain wave propagation effects at interfaces and impurities in terms of quasi-particle collisions. Next we consider wave propagation along Hertz-like granular chains of beads in the presence of disorder and periodicity in the interaction exponents present in the Hertz-like potential, modelling, for instance, inhomogeneity in the contact geometry between beads in the granular chain. We find that solitary waves in media with randomised interaction exponents (which models disorder in the contact geometry) experience exponential decay, where the dependence of the decay rate is similar to the case of randomised bead masses. In the periodic case of chains with interaction exponents alternating between two fixed values, we find qualitatively different propagation properties depending on the choice of the two exponents. In particular, we find regimes with either exponential decay or stable solitary wave propagation with pairwise collective behaviour.
  • We study dynamics emergent from a two-dimensional reaction--diffusion process modelled via a finite lattice dynamical system, as well as an analogous PDE system, involving spatially nonlocal interactions. These models govern the evolution of cells in a bioactive porous medium, with evolution of the local cell density depending on a coupled quasi--static fluid flow problem. We demonstrate differences emergent from the choice of a discrete lattice or a continuum for the spatial domain of such a process. We find long--time oscillations and steady states in cell density in both lattice and continuum models, but that the continuum model only exhibits solutions with vertical symmetry, independent of initial data, whereas the finite lattice admits asymmetric oscillations and steady states arising from symmetry-breaking bifurcations. We conjecture that it is the structure of the finite lattice which allows for more complicated asymmetric dynamics. Our analysis suggests that the origin of both types of oscillations is a nonlocal reaction-diffusion mechanism mediated by quasi-static fluid flow.
  • We study dynamics emergent from general complex Ginzburg-Landau systems, with the focus being on dynamics leading to amplitude death of one of the macroscopic wavefunctions. We first derive general analytical restrictions on parameters and nonlinear self- and cross-interaction terms leading to amplitude death of one wavefunction, and these results are verified numerically. For additional parameter restrictions beyond what is required for amplitude death, monotone or solitary wavefronts are possible; we exhibit asymptotic solutions to demonstrate this, and in certain parameter sets are even able to obtain closed-form exact solutions in the form of vector dark solitons. In the amplitude death regime, we find that one of these wave envelopes tends to zero while the other tends to a constant value uniformly over space, for large time. The results we obtain give a more general theoretical underpinning for recent amplitude death results reported in the literature, and in particular complement existing results for oscillator systems of diffusively coupled ODEs.
  • A contemporary procedure to grow artificial tissue is to seed cells onto a porous biomaterial scaffold and culture it within a perfusion bioreactor to facilitate the transport of nutrients to growing cells. Typical models of cell growth for tissue engineering applications make use of spatially homogeneous or spatially continuous equations to model cell growth, flow of culture medium, nutrient transport, and their interactions. The network structure of the physical porous scaffold is often incorporated through parameters in these models, either phenomenologically or through techniques like mathematical homogenization. We derive a model on a square grid lattice to demonstrate the importance of explicitly modelling the network structure of the porous scaffold, and compare results from this model with those from a modified continuum model from the literature. We capture two-way coupling between cell growth and fluid flow by allowing cells to block pores, and by allowing the shear stress of the fluid to affect cell growth and death. We explore a range of parameters for both models, and demonstrate quantitative and qualitative differences between predictions from each of these approaches, including spatial pattern formation and local oscillations in cell density present only in the lattice model. These differences suggest that for some parameter regimes, corresponding to specific cell types and scaffold geometries, the lattice model gives qualitatively different model predictions than typical continuum models. Our results inform model selection for bioactive porous tissue scaffolds, aiding in the development of successful tissue engineering experiments and eventually clinically successful technologies.
  • We study wave propagation in two-dimensional granular crystals under the Hertzian contact law consisting of hexagonal packings of spheres under various basin geometries including hexagonal, triangular, and circular basins which can be tiled with hexagons. We find that the basin geometry will influence wave reflection at the boundaries, as expected, and also may result in bottlenecks forming. While exterior strikers the size of a single sphere have been considered in the literature, it is also possible to consider strikers which impact multiple spheres along a boundary, or to have multiple sides being struck simultaneously. It is also possible to consider obstructions or even strikers in the interior of the hexagonally packed granular crystal, as previously considered in the case of square packings, resulting in the basin geometry no longer forming a convex set. We consider various configurations of either boundary or interior strikers. We shall also consider the case where a granular crystal is composed of two separate crystals of differing material, with a single interface between the two distinct materials. Depending on the relative material properties of each type of sphere, this can result in a trapping of most of the wave energy within one of the two regions. While repeated reflections from the boundaries will cause the systems we study to fall into disorder for large time, there are a number of interesting wave structures and patters that emerge as transients at intermediate timescales.
  • The discovery of Pluto's small moons in the last decade brought attention to the dynamics of the dwarf planet's satellites. Recent work has considered resonant interactions in the orbits of Pluto's small moons, with the Pluto-Charon system apparently inducing rotational chaos in non-spherical moons without the need of resonance. However, New Horizons observations suggest that despinning due to tidal dissipation has not taken place. Still, a tidally evolving Styx does appear to exhibit intermittent obliquity variations and episodes of tumbling, suggesting some form of chaos in the rotational dynamics. With these systems in mind, we study a planar $N$-body system in which all the bodies are point masses, except for a single rigid body. We then present a reduced model consisting of a planar $N$-body problem with the rigid body treated as a 1D continuum (i.e. the body is treated as a rod with an arbitrary mass distribution). Such a model provides a good approximation to highly asymmetric geometries, such as the recently observed interstellar asteroid 'Oumuamua, but is also amenable to analysis. We analytically demonstrate the existence of homoclinic chaos in the case where one of the orbits is nearly circular by way of the Melnikov method, and give numerical evidence for chaos when the orbits are more complicated. We show that the extent of chaos in parameter space is strongly tied to the deviations from a purely circular orbit. These results suggest that chaos is ubiquitous in many-body problems when one or more of the rigid bodies exhibits non-spherical and highly asymmetric geometries. The excitation of chaotic rotations does not appear to require tidal dissipation, obliquity variation, or orbital resonance. Such dynamics give a possible explanation for routes to chaotic dynamics observed in $N$-body systems such as the Pluto system where some of the bodies are highly non-spherical.
  • We use physical principles to derive a water wheel model under the assumption of an asymmetric water wheel for which the water inflow rate is in general unsteady (modeled by an arbitrary function of time). Our model allows one to recover the asymmetric water wheel with steady flow rate, as well as the symmetric water wheel, as special cases. Under physically reasonable assumptions we then reduce the underlying model into a non-autonomous nonlinear system. In order to determine parameter regimes giving chaotic dynamics in this non-autonomous nonlinear system, we consider an application of competitive modes analysis. In order to apply this method to a non-autonomous system, we are required to generalize the competitive modes analysis so that it is applicable to non-autonomous systems. The non-autonomous nonlinear water wheel model is shown to satisfy competitive modes conditions for chaos in certain parameter regimes, and we employ the obtained parameter regimes to construct the chaotic attractors. As anticipated, the asymmetric unsteady water wheel exhibits more disorder than does the asymmetric steady water wheel, which in turn is less regular than the symmetric steady state water wheel. Our results suggest that chaos should be fairly ubiquitous in the asymmetric water wheel model with unsteady inflow of water.
  • In the social, behavioral, and economic sciences, it is an important problem to predict which individual opinions will eventually dominate in a large population, if there will be a consensus, and how long it takes a consensus to form. This idea has been studied heavily both in physics and in other disciplines, and the answer depends strongly on both the model for opinions and for the network structure on which the opinions evolve. One model that was created to study consensus formation quantitatively is the Deffuant model, in which the opinion distribution of a population evolves via sequential random pairwise encounters. To consider the heterogeneity of interactions in a population due to social influence, we study the Deffuant model on various network structures (deterministic synthetic networks, random synthetic networks, and social networks constructed from Facebook data) using several interaction mechanisms. We numerically simulate the Deffuant model and conduct regression analyses to investigate the dependence of the convergence time to equilibrium on parameters, including a confidence bound for opinion updates, the number of participating entities, and their willingness to compromise. We find that network structure and parameter values both have an effect on the convergence time, and for some network topologies, the convergence time undergoes a transition at a critical value of the confidence bound. We discuss the number of opinion groups that form at equilibrium in terms of a confidence-bound threshold for a transition from consensus to multiple-opinion equilibria.
  • In recent work on the area of approximation methods for the solution of nonlinear differential equations, it has been suggested that the so-called generalized Taylor series approach is equivalent to the homotopy analysis method. In the present paper, we demonstrate that such a view is only valid in very special cases, and in general the homotopy analysis method is far more robust. In particular, the equivalence is only valid when the solution is represented as a power series in the independent variable. As has been shown many times, alternative basis functions can greatly improve the error properties of homotopy solutions, and when the base functions are not polynomials or power functions, we no longer have that the generalized Taylor series approach is equivalent to the homotopy analysis method. We demonstrate this by consideration of an example where the generalizes Taylor series must always have a finite radius of convergence (and hence limited applicability), while the homotopy solution is valid over the entire infinite domain. We then give a second example for which the exact solution is not analytic, and hence it will not agree with the generalized Taylor series over the domain. We conclude that the generalized Taylor series approach is not equivalent to the homotopy analysis method. In particular, the generalized Taylor series can at best recover local information about solutions, whereas the homotopy analysis method can recover the solutions globally if appropriate base functions are selected. Such results have important implications for how series are calculated when approximating solutions to nonlinear differential equations.
  • We consider reduction of dimension for nonlinear dynamical systems. We demonstrate that in some cases, one can reduce a nonlinear system of equations into a single equation for one of the state variables, and this can be useful for computing the solution when using a variety of analytical approaches. In the case where this reduction is possible, we employ differential elimination to obtain the reduced system. While analytical, the approach is algorithmic, and is implemented in symbolic software such as {\sc MAPLE} or {\sc SageMath}. In other cases, the reduction cannot be performed strictly in terms of differential operators, and one obtains integro-differential operators, which may still be useful. In either case, one can use the reduced equation to both approximate solutions for the state variables and perform chaos diagnostics more efficiently than could be done for the original higher-dimensional system, as well as to construct Lyapunov functions which help in the large-time study of the state variables. A number of chaotic and hyperchaotic dynamical systems are used as examples in order to motivate the approach.
  • The Hasimoto transformation between the classical LIA (local induction approximation, a model approximating the motion of a thin vortex filament) and the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation (NLS) has proven very useful in the past, since it allows one to construct new solutions to the LIA once a solution to the NLS is known. In the present paper, the quantum form of the LIA (which includes mutual friction effects) is put into correspondence with a type of complex nonlinear dispersive partial differential equation (PDE) with cubic nonlinearity (similar in form to a Ginsburg-Landau equation, with additional nonlinear terms). Transforming the quantum LIA in such a way enables one to obtain quantum vortex filament solutions once solutions to this dispersive PDE are known. From our quantum Hasimoto transformation, we determine the form and behavior of Stokes waves and a standing 1-soliton solution under normal and binormal friction effects. The soliton solution on a quantum vortex filament is a natural generalization of the classical 1-soliton solution constructed mathematically by Hasimoto (which motivated subsequent real-world experiments). The quantum Hasimoto transformation is useful when normal fluid velocity is relatively weak, so for the case where the normal fluid velocity is dominant we resort to other approaches. We consider the dynamics of the tangent vector to the vortex filament directly from the quantum LIA, and this approach, while less elegant than the quantum Hasimoto transformation, enables us to study waves primarily driven by the normal fluid velocity.
  • We present stable bright solitons built of coupled unstaggered and staggered components in a symmetric system of two discrete nonlinear Schr\"{o}dinger (DNLS) equations with the attractive self-phase-modulation (SPM) nonlinearity, coupled by the repulsive cross-phase-modulation (XPM) interaction. These mixed modes are of a "symbiotic" type, as each component in isolation may only carry ordinary unstaggered solitons. The results are obtained in an analytical form, using the variational and Thomas-Fermi approximations (VA and TFA), and the generalized Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) criterion for the evaluation of the stability. The analytical predictions are verified against numerical results. Almost all the symbiotic solitons are predicted by the VA quite accurately, and are stable. Close to a boundary of the existence region of the solitons (which may feature several connected branches), there are broad solitons which are not well approximated by the VA, and are unstable.
  • Resonant solitons of the $3\times 3$ operator are studied. The scattering data of this operator contains four transmission coefficients, two in each half complex $\zeta$-plane, where $\zeta$ is the spectral parameter. For anti-hermitian symmetry of the potential, the two transmission coefficients in the lower half plane (LHP) become equal to the complex conjugates of those in the upper half plane (UHP). The bound state scattering data for this operator consists in part of the zeros of these two transmission coefficients. Of particular interest is that class of soliton solutions when the two transmission coefficients have exactly equal eigenvalues, which gives rist to "resonant solitons". They arise from a bifurcation which is caused by the algebraic structure of the $3\times 3$ scattering matrix. We detail the asymptotics of this solution, showing that the latter contains the well known parametric interactions of "up-conversion" and "down-conversion". Lastly, we explain how this equality of eigenvalues in different transmission coefficients can be seen to be a nonlinear resonance condition.