• Swirling motions in the solar atmosphere have been widely observed in recent years and suggested to play a key role in channeling energy from the photosphere into the corona. Here, we present a newly-developed Automated Swirl Detection Algorithm (ASDA) and discuss its applications. ASDA is found to be very proficient at detecting swirls in a variety of synthetic data with various levels of noise, implying our subsequent scientific results are astute. Applying ASDA to photospheric observations with a spatial resolution of 39.2 km sampled by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on-board Hinode, suggests a total number of $1.62\times10^5$ swirls in the photosphere, with an average radius and rotating speed of $\sim290$ km and $< 1.0$ km s$^{-1}$, respectively. Comparisons between swirls detected in Bifrost numerical MHD simulations and both ground-based and space-borne observations, suggest that: 1) the spatial resolution of data plays a vital role in the total number and radii of swirls detected; and 2) noise introduced by seeing effects could decrease the detection rate of swirls, but has no significant influences in determining their inferred properties. All results have shown that there is no significant difference in the analysed properties between counter-clockwise or clockwise rotating swirls. About 70% of swirls are located in intergranular lanes. Most of the swirls have lifetimes less than twice of the cadences, meaning future research should aim to use data with much higher cadences than 6 s. In the conclusions, we propose some promising future research applications where ASDA may provide useful insights.
  • Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are arguably the most violent eruptions in the Solar System. CMEs can cause severe disturbances in the interplanetary space and even affect human activities in many respects, causing damages to infrastructure and losses of revenue. Fast and accurate prediction of CME arrival time is then vital to minimize the disruption CMEs may cause when interacting with geospace. In this paper, we propose a new approach for partial-/full-halo CME Arrival Time Prediction Using Machine learning Algorithms (CAT-PUMA). Via detailed analysis of the CME features and solar wind parameters, we build a prediction engine taking advantage of 182 previously observed geo-effective partial-/full-halo CMEs and using algorithms of the Support Vector Machine (SVM). We demonstrate that CAT-PUMA is accurate and fast. In particular, predictions after applying CAT-PUMA to a test set, that is unknown to the engine, show a mean absolute prediction error $\sim$5.9 hours of the CME arrival time, with 54% of the predictions having absolute errors less than 5.9 hours. Comparison with other models reveals that CAT-PUMA has a more accurate prediction for 77% of the events investigated; and can be carried out very fast, i.e. within minutes after providing the necessary input parameters of a CME. A practical guide containing the CAT-PUMA engine and the source code of two examples are available in the Appendix, allowing the community to perform their own applications for prediction using CAT-PUMA.
  • We present results from the investigation of 5-min umbral oscillations in a single-polarity sunspot of active region NOAA 12132. The spectra of TiO, H$\alpha$, and 304 \AA{} are used for corresponding atmospheric heights from the photosphere to lower corona. Power spectrum analysis at the formation height of H$\alpha$ - 0.6 \AA{} to H$\alpha$ center resulted in the detection of 5-min oscillation signals in intensity interpreted as running waves outside the umbral center, mostly with vertical magnetic field inclination $>15\deg$. A phase-speed filter is used to extract the running wave signals with speed $v_{ph}> 4$ km s$^{-1}$, from the time series of H$\alpha$ - 0.4 \AA{} images, and found twenty-four 3-min umbral oscillatory events in a duration of one hour. Interestingly, the initial emergence of the 3-min umbral oscillatory events are noticed closer to or at umbral boundaries. These 3-min umbral oscillatory events are observed for the first time as propagating from a fraction of preceding Running Penumbral Waves (RPWs). These fractional wavefronts rapidly separates from RPWs and move towards umbral center, wherein they expand radially outwards suggesting the beginning of a new umbral oscillatory event. We found that most of these umbral oscillatory events develop further into RPWs. We speculate that the waveguides of running waves are twisted in spiral structures and hence the wavefronts are first seen at high latitudes of umbral boundaries and later at lower latitudes of the umbral center.
  • The rotational motion of solar jets is believed to be a signature of the untwisting process resulting from magnetic reconnection, which takes place between twisted closed magnetic loops (i.e., magnetic flux ropes) and open magnetic field lines. The identification of the pre-existing flux rope, and the relationship between the twist contained in the rope and the number of turns the jet experiences, are then vital in understanding the jet-triggering mechanism. In this paper, we will perform a detailed analysis of imaging, spectral and magnetic field observations of four homologous jets, among which the fourth one releases a twist angle of 2.6$\pi$. Non-linear force free field extrapolation of the photospheric vector magnetic field before the jet eruption presents a magnetic configuration with a null point between twisted and open fields - a configuration highly in favor of the eruption of solar jets. The fact that the jet rotates in the opposite sense of handness to the twist contained in the pre-eruption photospheric magnetic field, confirms the unwinding of the twist by the jet's rotational motion. Temporal relationship between jets' occurrence and the total negative flux at their source region, together with the enhanced magnetic submergence term of the photospheric Poynting flux, shows that these jets are highly associated with local magnetic flux cancellation.
  • Solar chromospheric observations of sunspot umbrae offer an exceptional view of magneto-hydrodynamic wave phenomena. In recent years, a wealth of wave signatures related to propagating magneto-acoustic modes have been presented, which demonstrate complex spatial and temporal structuring of the wave components. Theoretical modelling has demonstrated how these ubiquitous waves are consistent with an m=0 slow magneto-acoustic mode, which are excited by trapped sub-photospheric acoustic (p-mode) waves. However, the spectrum of umbral waves is broad, suggesting that the observed signatures represent the superposition of numerous frequencies and/or modes. We apply Fourier filtering, in both spatial and temporal domains, to extract chromospheric umbral wave characteristics consistent with an m=1 slow magneto-acoustic mode. This identification has not been described before. Angular frequencies of 0.037 +/- 0.007 rad/s (2.1 +/- 0.4 deg/s), corresponding to a period approximately 170 s for the m=1 mode are uncovered for spatial wavenumbers in the range of 0.45<k<0.90 arcsec^-1 (5000-9000 km). Theoretical dispersion relations are solved, with corresponding eigenfunctions computed, which allows the density perturbations to be investigated and compared with our observations. Such magnetohydrodynamic modelling confirms our interpretation that the identified wave signatures are the first direct observations of an m=1 slow magneto-acoustic mode in the chromospheric umbra of a sunspot.
  • Based on the \emph{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} observations, we study the response of a solar sunspot light wall to external disturbances. A flare occurrence near the light wall caused material to erupt from the lower solar atmosphere into the corona. Some material falls back to the solar surface, and hits the light bridge (i.e., the base of the light wall), then sudden brightenings appear at the wall base followed by the rise of wall top, leading to an increase of the wall height. Once the brightness of the wall base fades, the height of the light wall begins to decrease. Five hours later, another nearby flare takes place, a bright channel is formed that extends from the flare towards the light bridge. Although no obvious material flow along the bright channel is found, some ejected material is conjectured to reach the light bridge. Subsequently, the wall base brightens and the wall height begins to increase again. Once more, when the brightness of the wall base decays, the wall top fluctuates to lower heights. We suggest, based on the observed cases, that the interaction of falling material and ejected flare material with the light wall results in the brightenings of wall base and causes the height of the light wall to increase. Our results reveal that the light wall can be not only powered by the linkage of \emph{p}-mode from below the photosphere, but may also be enhanced by external disturbances, such as falling material.
  • The forecast method introduced by Kors\'os et al.(2014) is generalised from the horizontal magnetic gradient (GM), defined between two opposite polarity spots, to all spots within an appropriately defined region close to the magnetic neutral line of an active region. This novel approach is not limited to searching for the largest GM of two single spots as in previous methods. Instead, the pre-flare conditions of the evolution of spot groups is captured by the introduction of the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient, or W_GM. This new proxy enables the potential of forecasting flares stronger than M5. The improved capability includes (i) the prediction of flare onset time and (ii) an assessment whether a flare is followed by another event within about 18 hours. The prediction of onset time is found to be more accurate here. A linear relationship is established between the duration of converging motion and the time elapsed from the moment of closest position to that of the flare onset of opposite polarity spot groups. The other promising relationship is between the maximum of the W_GM prior to flaring and the value of W_GM at the moment of the initial flare onset in the case of multiple flaring. We found that when the W_GM decreases by about 54%, then there is no second flare. If, however, when the W_GM decreases less than 42%, then there will be likely a follow-up flare stronger than M5. This new capability may be useful for an automated flare prediction tool.