• Accurate shape measurements are essential to infer cosmological parameters from large area weak gravitational lensing studies. The compact diffraction-limited point-spread function (PSF) in space-based observations is greatly beneficial, but its chromaticity for a broad band observation can lead to new subtle effects that could hitherto be ignored: the PSF of a galaxy is no longer uniquely defined and spatial variations in the colours of galaxies result in biases in the inferred lensing signal. Taking Euclid as a reference, we show that this colourgradient bias (CG bias) can be quantified with high accuracy using available multi-colour Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. In particular we study how noise in the HST observations might impact such measurements and find this to be negligible. We determine the CG bias using HST observations in the F606W and F814W filters and observe a correlation with the colour, in line with expectations, whereas the dependence with redshift is weak. The biases for individual galaxies are generally well below 1%, which may be reduced further using morphological information from the Euclid data. Our results demonstrate that CG bias should not be ignored, but it is possible to determine its amplitude with sufficient precision, so that it will not significantly bias the weak lensing measurements using Euclid data.
  • The unprecedented quality, the increased dataset, and the wide area of ongoing and near future weak lensing surveys allows to move beyond the standard two points statistics thus making worthwhile to investigate higher order probes. As an interesting step towards this direction, we expolore the use of higher order moments (HOM) of the convergence field as a way to increase the lensing Figure of Merit (FoM). To this end, we rely on simulated convergence to first show that HOM can be measured and calibrated so that it is indeed possible to predict them for a given cosmological model provided suitable nuisance parameters are introduced and then marginalized over. We then forecast the accuracy on cosmological parameters from the use of HOM alone and in combination with standard shear power spectra tomography. It turns out that HOM allow to break some common degeneracies thus significantly boosting the overall FoM. We also qualitatively discuss possible systematics and how they can be dealt with.
  • Gravitational lensing has long been considered as a valuable tool to determine the total mass of galaxy clusters. The shear profile as inferred from the statistics of ellipticity of background galaxies allows to probe the cluster intermediate and outer regions thus determining the virial mass estimate. However, the mass sheet degeneracy and the need for a large number of background galaxies motivate the search for alternative tracers which can break the degeneracy among model parameters and hence improve the accuracy of the mass estimate. Lensing flexion, i.e. the third derivative of the lensing potential, has been suggested as a good answer to the above quest since it probes the details of the mass profile. We investigate here whether this is indeed the case considering jointly using weak lensing, magnification and flexion. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the relative improvement in the mass accuracy for different assumptions on the shear and flexion signal - to - noise (S/N) ratio also varying the cluster mass, redshift, and ellipticity. It turns out that the error on the cluster mass may be reduced up to a factor 2 for reasonable values of the flexion S/N ratio. As a general result, we get that the improvement in mass accuracy is larger for more flattened haloes, but extracting general trends is a difficult because of the many parameters at play. We nevertheless find that flexion is as efficient as magnification to increase the accuracy in both mass and concentration determination.
  • The spatial variation of the colour of a galaxy may introduce a bias in the measurement of its shape if the PSF profile depends on wavelength. We study how this bias depends on the properties of the PSF and the galaxies themselves. The bias depends on the scales used to estimate the shape, which may be used to optimise methods to reduce the bias. Here we develop a general approach to quantify the bias. Although applicable to any weak lensing survey, we focus on the implications for the ESA Euclid mission. Based on our study of synthetic galaxies we find that the bias is a few times 10^-3 for a typical galaxy observed by Euclid. Consequently, it cannot be neglected and needs to be accounted for. We demonstrate how one can do so using spatially resolved observations of galaxies in two filters. We show that HST observations in the F606W and F814W filters allow us to model and reduce the bias by an order of magnitude, sufficient to meet Euclid's scientific requirements. The precision of the correction is ultimately determined by the number of galaxies for which spatially-resolved observations in at least two filters are available. We use results from the Millennium Simulation to demonstrate that archival HST data will be sufficient for the tomographic cosmic shear analysis with the Euclid dataset.