• We propose a new way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories without any renormalization procedure. The resulting Hamiltonians, called IBC Hamiltonians, are mathematically well-defined (and in particular, ultraviolet finite) without an ultraviolet cut-off such as smearing out the particles over a nonzero radius; rather, the particles are assigned radius zero. These Hamiltonians agree with those obtained through renormalization whenever both are known to exist. We describe explicit examples of IBC Hamiltonians. Their definition, which is best expressed in the particle-position representation of the wave function, involves a novel type of boundary condition on the wave function, which we call an interior-boundary condition (IBC). The relevant configuration space is one of a variable number of particles, and the relevant boundary consists of the configurations with two or more particles at the same location. The IBC relates the value (or derivative) of the wave function at a boundary point to the value of the wave function at an interior point (here, in a sector of configuration space corresponding to a lesser number of particles).
  • We develop an extension of Bohmian mechanics to a curved background space-time containing a singularity. The present paper focuses on timelike singularities. We use the naked timelike singularity of the super-critical Reissner-Nordstrom geometry as an example. While one could impose boundary conditions at the singularity that would prevent the particles from falling into the singularity, we are interested here in the case in which particles have positive probability to hit the singularity and get annihilated. The wish for reversibility, equivariance, and the Markov property then dictates that particles must also be created by the singularity, and indeed dictates the rate at which this must occur. That is, a stochastic law prescribes what comes out of the singularity. We specify explicit equations of a non-rigorous model involving an interior-boundary condition on the wave function at the singularity, which can be used also in other versions of quantum theory besides Bohmian mechanics. As the resulting theory involves particle creation and annihilation, it can be regarded as a quantum field theory, and the stochastic process for the Bohmian particles is analogous to Bell-type quantum field theories.
  • The biggest and most lasting among David Bohm's (1917-1992) many achievements is to have proposed a picture of reality that explains the empirical rules of quantum mechanics. This picture, known as pilot wave theory or Bohmian mechanics among other names, is still the simplest and most convincing explanation available. According to this theory, electrons are point particles in the literal sense and move along trajectories governed by Bohm's equation of motion. In this paper, I describe some more recent developments and extensions of Bohmian mechanics, concerning in particular relativistic space-time and particle creation and annihilation.
  • Bohmian Mechanics (1704.08017)

    April 5, 2018 quant-ph
    Bohmian mechanics, also known as pilot-wave theory or de Broglie-Bohm theory, is a formulation of quantum mechanics whose fundamental axioms are not about what observers will see if they perform an experiment but about what happens in reality. It is therefore called a "quantum theory without observers," alongside with collapse theories and many-worlds theories and in contrast to orthodox quantum mechanics. It follows from these axioms that in a universe governed by Bohmian mechanics, observers will see outcomes with exactly the probabilities specified by the usual rules of quantum mechanics for empirical predictions. Specifically, Bohmian mechanics asserts that electrons and other elementary particles have a definite position at every time and move according to an equation of motion that is one of the fundamental laws of the theory and involves a wave function that evolves according to the usual Schr\"odinger equation. Bohmian mechanics is named after David Bohm (1917-1992), who was, although not the first to consider this theory, the first to realize (in 1952) that it actually makes correct predictions.
  • We study a new kind of linear integral equations for a relativistic quantum-mechanical two-particle wave function $\psi(x_1,x_2)$, where $x_1,x_2$ are spacetime points. In the case of retarded interaction, these integral equations feature a Volterra structure in the time variables. They are interesting not only in view of their applications in physics, but also because of the following mathematical features: (a) time and space variables are more interrelated than in normal time-dependent problems, (b) the integral kernels are singular, and the structure of these singularities is non-trivial, (c) they feature time delay. Here we formulate a number of examples of such equations and prove existence and uniqueness of solutions for them. We also point out open mathematical problems.
  • Suppose that particle detectors are placed along a Cauchy surface $\Sigma$ in Minkowski space-time, and consider a quantum theory with fixed or variable number of particles (i.e., using Fock space or a subspace thereof). It is straightforward to guess what Born's rule should look like for this setting: The probability distribution of the detected configuration on $\Sigma$ has density $|\psi_\Sigma|^2$, where $\psi_\Sigma$ is a suitable wave function on $\Sigma$, and the operation $|\cdot|^2$ is suitably interpreted. We call this statement the "curved Born rule." Since in any one Lorentz frame, the appropriate measurement postulates referring to constant-$t$ hyperplanes should determine the probabilities of the outcomes of any conceivable experiment, they should also imply the curved Born rule. This is what we are concerned with here: deriving Born's rule for $\Sigma$ from Born's rule in one Lorentz frame (along with a collapse rule). We describe two ways of defining an idealized detection process, and prove for one of them that the probability distribution coincides with $|\psi_\Sigma|^2$. For this result, we need two hypotheses on the time evolution: that there is no interaction faster than light, and that there is no propagation faster than light. The wave function $\psi_\Sigma$ can be obtained from the Tomonaga--Schwinger equation, or from a multi-time wave function by inserting configurations on $\Sigma$. Thus, our result establishes in particular how multi-time wave functions are related to detection probabilities.
  • Multi-time wave functions are wave functions for multi-particle quantum systems that involve several time variables (one per particle). In this paper we contrast them with solutions of wave equations on a space-time with multiple timelike dimensions, i.e., on a pseudo-Riemannian manifold whose metric has signature such as ${+}{+}{-}{-}$ or ${+}{+}{-}{-}{-}{-}{-}{-}$, instead of ${+}{-}{-}{-}$. Despite the superficial similarity, the two behave very differently: Whereas wave equations in multiple timelike dimensions are typically mathematically ill-posed and presumably unphysical, relevant Schr\"odinger equations for multi-time wave functions possess for every initial datum a unique solution on the spacelike configurations and form a natural covariant representation of quantum states.
  • We consider a way of defining quantum Hamiltonians involving particle creation and annihilation based on an interior-boundary condition (IBC) on the wave function, where the wave function is the particle-position representation of a vector in Fock space, and the IBC relates (essentially) the values of the wave function at any two configurations that differ only by the creation of a particle. Here we prove, for a model of particle creation at one or more point sources using the Laplace operator as the free Hamiltonian, that a Hamiltonian can indeed be rigorously defined in this way without the need for any ultraviolet regularization, and that it is self-adjoint. We prove further that introducing an ultraviolet cut-off (thus smearing out particles over a positive radius) and applying a certain known renormalization procedure (taking the limit of removing the cut-off while subtracting a constant that tends to infinity) yields, up to addition of a finite constant, the Hamiltonian defined by the IBC.
  • Collapse theories are versions of quantum mechanics according to which the collapse of the wave function is a real physical process. They propose precise mathematical laws to govern this process and to replace the vague conventional prescription that a collapse occurs whenever an "observer" makes a "measurement." The "primitive ontology" of a theory (more or less what Bell called the "local beables") are the variables in the theory that represent matter in space-time. There is no consensus about whether collapse theories need to introduce a primitive ontology as part of their definition. I make some remarks on this question and point out that certain paradoxes about collapse theories are absent if a primitive ontology is introduced.
  • In non-relativistic quantum mechanics of $N$ particles in three spatial dimensions, the wave function $\psi(q_1,\ldots,q_N,t)$ is a function of $3N$ position coordinates and one time coordinate. It is an obvious idea that in a relativistic setting, such functions should be replaced by $\phi((t_1,q_1),\ldots,(t_N,q_N))$, a function of $N$ space-time points called a multi-time wave function because it involves $N$ time variables. Its evolution is determined by $N$ Schr\"odinger equations, one for each time variable; to ensure that simultaneous solutions to these $N$ equations exist, the $N$ Hamiltonians need to satisfy a consistency condition. This condition is automatically satisfied for non-interacting particles, but it is not obvious how to set up consistent multi-time equations with interaction. For example, interaction potentials (such as the Coulomb potential) make the equations inconsistent, except in very special cases. However, there have been recent successes in setting up consistent multi-time equations involving interaction, in two ways: either involving zero-range ($\delta$ potential) interaction or involving particle creation and annihilation. The latter equations provide a multi-time formulation of a quantum field theory. The wave function in these equations is a multi-time Fock function, i.e., a family of functions consisting of, for every $n=0,1,2,\ldots$, an $n$-particle wave function with $n$ time variables. These wave functions are related to the Tomonaga-Schwinger approach and to quantum field operators, but, as we point out, they have several advantages.
  • We study the nature of and approach to thermal equilibrium in isolated quantum systems. An individual isolated macroscopic quantum system in a pure or mixed state is regarded as being in thermal equilibrium if all macroscopic observables assume rather sharply the values obtained from thermodynamics. Of such a system (or state) we say that it is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). A stronger requirement than MATE is that even microscopic observables (i.e., ones referring to a small subsystem) have a probability distribution in agreement with that obtained from the micro-canonical, or equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. Of such a system we say that it is in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization (MBL) for which the energy eigenfuctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. However, if we consider superpositions of energy eigenfunctions (i.e., typical wave functions $\psi$) in an energy shell, then for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most $\psi$ are in both MATE and MITE. We explore here the properties of MATE and MITE and compare the two notions, thereby elaborating on ideas introduced in [Goldstein et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 115: 100402 (2015)].
  • According to statistical mechanics, micro-states of an isolated physical system (say, a gas in a box) at time $t_0$ in a given macro-state of less-than-maximal entropy typically evolve in such a way that the entropy at time $t$ increases with $|t-t_0|$ in both time directions. In order to account for the observed entropy increase in only one time direction, the thermodynamic arrow of time, one usually appeals to the hypothesis that the initial state of the universe was one of very low entropy. In certain recent models of cosmology, however, no hypothesis about the initial state of the universe is invoked. We discuss how the emergence of a thermodynamic arrow of time in such models can nevertheless be compatible with the above-mentioned consequence of statistical mechanics, appearances to the contrary notwithstanding.
  • The problem of detection time distribution concerns a quantum particle surrounded by detectors and consists of computing the probability distribution of where and when the particle will be detected. While the correct answer can be obtained in principle by solving the Schrodinger equation of particle and detectors together, a more practical answer should involve a simple rule representing the behavior of idealized detectors. We have argued elsewhere [http://arxiv.org/abs/1601.03715] that the most natural rule for this purpose is the "absorbing boundary rule," based on the 1-particle Schrodinger equation with a certain "absorbing" boundary condition, first considered by Werner in 1987, at the ideal detecting surface. Here we develop a relativistic variant of this rule using the Dirac equation and also a boundary condition. We treat one or several detectable particles, in flat or curved space-time, with stationary or moving detectors.
  • We address the question of how to compute the probability distribution of the time at which a detector clicks, in the situation of $n$ non-relativistic quantum particles in a volume $\Omega\subset \mathbb{R}^3$ in physical space and detectors placed along the boundary $\partial \Omega$ of $\Omega$. We have recently [http://arxiv.org/abs/1601.03715] argued in favor of a rule for the 1-particle case that involves a Schr\"odinger equation with an absorbing boundary condition on $\partial \Omega$ introduced by Werner; we call this rule the "absorbing boundary rule." Here, we describe the natural extension of the absorbing boundary rule to the $n$-particle case. A key element of this extension is that, upon a detection event, the wave function gets collapsed by inserting the detected position, at the time of detection, into the wave function, thus yielding a wave function of $n-1$ particles. We also describe an extension of the absorbing boundary rule to the case of moving detectors.
  • We consider the problem of computing, for a detector waiting for a quantum particle to arrive, the probability distribution of the time at which the detector clicks, from the initial wave function of the particle in the non-relativistic regime. Although the standard rules of quantum mechanics offer no operator for the time of arrival, quantum mechanics makes an unambiguous prediction for this distribution, defined by first solving the Schrodinger equation for the big quantum system formed by the particle of interest, the detector, a clock, and a device that records the time when the detector clicks, then making a quantum measurement of the record at a very late time, and finally using the distribution of the recorded time. This leads to question whether there is also a practical, simple rule for computing this distribution, at least approximately (i.e., for an idealized detector). We argue here in favor of a rule based on a 1-particle Schrodinger equation with a certain (absorbing) boundary condition at the ideal detecting surface, first considered by Werner in 1987. We present a novel derivation of this rule and describe how it arises as a limit of a "soft" detector represented by an imaginary potential.
  • We consider a model quantum field theory with a scalar quantum field in de Sitter space-time in a Bohmian version with a field ontology, i.e., an actual field configuration $\varphi({\bf x},t)$ guided by a wave function on the space of field configurations. We analyze the asymptotics at late times ($t\to\infty$) and provide reason to believe that for more or less any wave function and initial field configuration, every Fourier coefficient $\varphi_{\bf k}(t)$ of the field is asymptotically of the form $c_{\bf k}\sqrt{1+{\bf k}^2 \exp(-2Ht)/H^2}$, where the limiting coefficients $c_{\bf k}=\varphi_{\bf k}(\infty)$ are independent of $t$ and $H$ is the Hubble constant quantifying the expansion rate of de Sitter space-time. In particular, every field mode $\varphi_{\bf k}$ possesses a limit as $t\to\infty$ and thus "freezes." This result is relevant to the question whether Boltzmann brains form in the late universe according to this theory, and supports that they do not.
  • There are two kinds of quantum fluctuations relevant to cosmology that we focus on in this article: those that form the seeds for structure formation in the early universe and those giving rise to Boltzmann brains in the late universe. First, structure formation requires slight inhomogeneities in the density of matter in the early universe, which then get amplified by the effect of gravity, leading to clumping of matter into stars and galaxies. According to inflation theory, quantum fluctuations form the seeds of these inhomogeneities. However, these quantum fluctuations are described by a quantum state which is homogeneous and isotropic, and this raises a problem, connected to the foundations of quantum theory, as the unitary evolution alone cannot break the symmetry of the quantum state. Second, Boltzmann brains are random agglomerates of particles that, by extreme coincidence, form functioning brains. Unlikely as these coincidences are, they seem to be predicted to occur in a quantum universe as vacuum fluctuations if the universe continues to exist for an infinite (or just very long) time, in fact to occur over and over, even forming the majority of all brains in the history of the universe. We provide a brief introduction to the Bohmian version of quantum theory and explain why in this version, Boltzmann brains, an undesirable kind of fluctuation, do not occur (or at least not often), while inhomogeneous seeds for structure formation, a desirable kind of fluctuation, do.
  • We are concerned with the problem of detecting with high probability whether a wave function has collapsed or not, in the following framework: A quantum system with a $d$-dimensional Hilbert space is initially in state $\psi$; with probability $0<p<1$, the state collapses relative to the orthonormal basis $b_1,...,b_d$. That is, the final state $\psi'$ is random; it is $\psi$ with probability $1-p$ and $b_k$ (up to a phase) with $p$ times Born's probability $|\langle b_k|\psi \rangle|^2$. Now an experiment on the system in state $\psi'$ is desired that provides information about whether or not a collapse has occurred. Elsewhere, we identify and discuss the optimal experiment in case that $\psi$ is either known or random with a known probability distribution. Here we present results about the case that no a priori information about $\psi$ is available, while we regard $p$ and $b_1,...,b_d$ as known. For certain values of $p$, we show that the set of $\psi$s for which any experiment E is more reliable than blind guessing is at most half the unit sphere; thus, in this regime, any experiment is of questionable use, if any at all. Remarkably, however, there are other values of $p$ and experiments E such that the set of $\psi$s for which E is more reliable than blind guessing has measure greater than half the sphere, though with a conjectured maximum of 64% of the sphere.
  • We consider the notion of thermal equilibrium for an individual closed macroscopic quantum system in a pure state, i.e., described by a wave function. The macroscopic properties in thermal equilibrium of such a system, determined by its wave function, must be the same as those obtained from thermodynamics, e.g., spatial uniformity of temperature and chemical potential. When this is true we say that the system is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). Such a system may however not be in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The latter requires that the reduced density matrices of small subsystems be close to those obtained from the microcanonical, equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization (MBL) for which the energy eigenfunctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. We note however that for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most wave functions in an energy shell are in both MATE and MITE. For a classical macroscopic system, MATE holds for most phase points on the energy surface, but MITE fails to hold for any phase point.
  • We describe here a novel way of defining Hamiltonians for quantum field theories (QFTs), based on the particle-position representation of the state vector and involving a condition on the state vector that we call an "interior-boundary condition." At least for some QFTs (and, we hope, for many), this approach leads to a well-defined, self-adjoint Hamiltonian without the need for an ultraviolet cut-off or renormalization.
  • The version of Bohmian mechanics in relativistic space-time that works best, the hypersurface Bohm--Dirac model, assumes a preferred foliation of space-time into spacelike hypersurfaces (called the time foliation) as given. We consider here a degenerate case in which, contrary to the usual definition of a foliation, several leaves of the time foliation have a region in common. That is, if we think of the time foliation as a 1-parameter family of hypersurfaces, with the hypersurfaces moving towards the future as we increase the parameter, a degenerate time foliation is one for which a part of the hypersurface does not move as we increase the parameter. We show that the hypersurface Bohm--Dirac model still works in this situation; that is, we show that a Bohm-type law of motion can still be defined, and that the appropriate $|\psi|^2$ distribution is still equivariant with respect to this law.
  • Let X be a real or complex Hilbert space of finite but large dimension d, let S(X) denote the unit sphere of X, and let u denote the normalized uniform measure on S(X). For a finite subset B of S(X), we may test whether it is approximately uniformly distributed over the sphere by choosing a partition A_1,...,A_m of S(X) and checking whether the fraction of points in B that lie in A_k is close to u(A_k) for each k=1,...,m. We show that if B is any orthonormal basis of X and m is not too large, then, if we randomize the test by applying a random rotation to the sets A_1,...,A_m, B will pass the random test with probability close to 1. This statement is related to, but not entailed by, the law of large numbers. An application of this fact in quantum statistical mechanics is briefly described.
  • A quantum system (with Hilbert space $\mathscr{H}_1$) entangled with its environment (with Hilbert space $\mathscr{H}_2$) is usually not attributed a wave function but only a reduced density matrix $\rho_1$. Nevertheless, there is a precise way of attributing to it a random wave function $\psi_1$, called its conditional wave function, whose probability distribution $\mu_1$ depends on the entangled wave function $\psi\in\mathscr{H}_1\otimes\mathscr{H}_2$ in the Hilbert space of system and environment together. It also depends on a choice of orthonormal basis of $\mathscr{H}_2$ but in relevant cases, as we show, not very much. We prove several universality (or typicality) results about $\mu_1$, e.g., that if the environment is sufficiently large then for every orthonormal basis of $\mathscr{H}_2$, most entangled states $\psi$ with given reduced density matrix $\rho_1$ are such that $\mu_1$ is close to one of the so-called GAP (Gaussian adjusted projected) measures, $GAP(\rho_1)$. We also show that, for most entangled states $\psi$ from a microcanonical subspace (spanned by the eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian with energies in a narrow interval $[E,E+\delta E]$) and most orthonormal bases of $\mathscr{H}_2$, $\mu_1$ is close to $GAP(\mathrm{tr}_2 \rho_{mc})$ with $\rho_{mc}$ the normalized projection to the microcanonical subspace. In particular, if the coupling between the system and the environment is weak, then $\mu_1$ is close to $GAP(\rho_\beta)$ with $\rho_\beta$ the canonical density matrix on $\mathscr{H}_1$ at inverse temperature $\beta=\beta(E)$. This provides the mathematical justification of our claim in [J. Statist. Phys. 125:1193 (2006), http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0309021] that $GAP$ measures describe the thermal equilibrium distribution of the wave function.
  • While it is widely agreed that Bell's theorem is an important result in the foundations of quantum physics, there is much disagreement about what exactly Bell's theorem shows. It is agreed that Bell derived a contradiction with experimental facts from some list of assumptions, thus showing that at least one of the assumptions must be wrong; but there is disagreement about what the assumptions were that went into the argument. In this paper, I make a few points in order to help clarify the situation.
  • In an article published in 2010, Kiukas and Werner claim to have shown that Bohmian Mechanics does not make the same empirical predictions as ordinary Quantum Mechanics. We explain that such claim is wrong.