• We present a panoramic map of the stellar streams of the Milky Way based upon astrometric and photometric measurements from the Gaia DR2 catalogue. In this first contribution, we concentrate on the halo at heliocentric distances beyond 5 kpc, and at Galactic latitudes $|b|>30\deg$, using the STREAMFINDER algorithm to detect structures along plausible orbits that are consistent with the Gaia proper motion measurements. We find a rich network of criss-crossing streams in the halo, often with striking kinematic coherence. Some of these structures were previously-known, several are new discoveries, but others are potentially artefacts of the Gaia scanning law and will require confirmation. With these initial discoveries, we are starting to unravel the complex formation of the halo of our Galaxy.
  • The Monoceros Ring (MRi) structure is an apparent stellar overdensity that has been postulated to entirely encircle the Galactic plane and has been variously described as being due to line-of-sight effects of the Galactic warp and flare or of extragalactic origin (via accretion). Despite being intensely scrutinised in the literature for more than a decade, no studies to-date have been able to definitively uncover its origins. Here we use $N$-body simulations and a genetic algorithm to explore the parameter space for the initial position, orbital parameters and, for the first time, the final location of a satellite progenitor. We fit our models to the latest Pan-STARRS data to determine whether an accretion scenario is capable of producing an in- Plane ring-like structure matching the known parameters of the MRi. Our simulations produce streams that closely match the location, proper motion and kinematics of the MRi structure. However, we are not able to reproduce the mass estimates from earlier studies based on Pan-STARRS data. Furthermore, in contrast with earlier studies our best-fit models are those for progenitors on retrograde orbits. If the MRi was produced by satellite accretion, we find that its progenitor has an initial mass upper limit of ~$10^{10}$M$_\odot$ and the remnant is likely located behind the Galactic bulge, making it diffcult to locate observationally. While our models produce realistic MRi-like structures we cannot definitively conclude that the MRi was produced by the accretion of a satellite galaxy.
  • We present homogeneous, sub-horizontal branch photometry of twenty dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of M31 observed with the Hubble Space Telescope. Combining our new data for sixteen systems with archival data in the same filters for another four, we show that Andromeda dwarf spheroidal galaxies favor strikingly red horizontal branches or red clumps down to ~10^{4.2} Lsun (M_V ~ -5.8). The age-sensitivity of horizontal branch stars implies that a large fraction of the M31 dwarf galaxies have extended star formation histories (SFHs), and appear inconsistent with early star formation episodes that were rapidly shutdown. Systems fainter than ~10^{5.5} Lsun show the widest range in the ratios and morphologies of red and blue horizontal branches, indicative of both complex SFHs and a diversity in quenching timescales and/or mechanisms, which is qualitatively different from what is currently known for faint Milky Way (MW) satellites of comparable luminosities. Our findings bolster similar conclusions from recent deeper data for a handful of M31 dwarf galaxies. We discuss several sources for diversity of our data such as varying halo masses, patchy reionization, mergers/accretion, and the environmental influence of M31 and the Milky Way on the early evolution of their satellite populations. A detailed comparison between the histories of M31 and MW satellites would shed signifiant insight into the processes that drive the evolution of low-mass galaxies. Such a study will require imaging that reaches the oldest main sequence turnoffs for a significant number of M31 companions.
  • The planar arrangement of nearly half the satellite galaxies of M31 has been a source of mystery and speculation since it was discovered. With a growing number of other host galaxies showing these satellite galaxy planes, their stability and longevity have become central to the debate on whether the presence of satellite planes are a natural consequence of prevailing cosmological models, or represent a challenge. Given the dependence of their stability on host halo shape, we look into how a galaxy plane's dark matter environment influences its longevity. An increased number of dark matter subhalos results in increased interactions that hasten the deterioration of an already-formed plane of satellite galaxies in spherical dark halos. The role of total dark matter mass fraction held in subhalos in dispersing a plane of galaxies present non trivial effects on plane longevity as well. But any misalignments of plane inclines to major axes of flattened dark matter halos lead to their lifetimes being reduced to < 3 Gyrs. Distributing > 40% of total dark mass in subhalos in the overall dark matter distribution results in a plane of satellite galaxies that is prone to change through the 5 Gyr integration time period.
  • The existence of a spatially thin, kinematically coherent Disk of Satellites (DoS) around the Milky Way (MW), is a problem that often garners vivacious debate in the literature or at scientific meetings. One of the most recent incarnations of this wrangle occurred with two papers by Maji et al, who argued that these structures "maybe a misinterpretation of the data". These claims are in stark contrast to previous works. Motivated by this and other recent publications on this problem, we discuss necessary considerations to make, observational effects to consider, and pitfalls to avoid when investigating satellite galaxy planes such as the MW's DoS. In particular, we emphasize that conclusions need to have a statistical basis including a determination of the significance of satellite alignments, observational biases must not be ignored, and measurement errors (e.g. for proper motions) need to be considered. We discuss general problems faced by attempts to determine the dynamical stability of the DoS via orbit integrations of MW satellite galaxies, and demonstrate that to interpret simulations, it is helpful to compare them with a null case of isotropically distributed satellite positions and velocities. Based on these criteria, we find that the conclusions of Maji et al. do not hold up to scrutiny, and that their hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a single host shows no evidence for a significant kinematic coherence among the simulated satellite galaxies, in contrast to the observed MW system.
  • We present two spectroscopic surveys of the tidal stellar stream of the Palomar 5 globular cluster, undertaken with the VLT/FLAMES and AAT/AAOmega instruments. We use these data in conjunction with photometric data presented in the previous contribution in this series to classify the survey stars in terms of their probability of belonging to the Palomar 5 stellar stream. We find that high-probability candidates are only found in a very narrow spatial interval surrounding the locus of the stream on the sky. PanSTARRS RRLyrae stars in this region of sky are also distributed in a similar manner. The absence of significant "fanning" of this stellar stream confirms that Palomar 5 does not follow a chaotic orbit. Previous studies have found that Palomar 5 is largely devoid of low-mass stars, and we show that this is true also of the stellar populations along the trailing arm out to $6\deg$. Within this region, which contains 73\% of the detected stars, the population is statistically identical to the core, implying that the ejection of the low-mass stars occurred before the formation of the stream. We also present an updated structural model fit to the bound remnant, which yields a total mass of $4297\pm98 {\rm\,M_\odot}$ and a tidal radius $0.145\pm0.009$ kpc. We estimate the mass of the observed system including the stream to be $12200\pm400 {\rm\,M_\odot}$, and the initial mass to have been $\sim47000\pm1500 {\rm\,M_\odot}$. These observational constraints will be employed in our next study to model the dynamics of the system in detail.
  • We present a method for measuring the Sun's motion using the proper motions of Galactic halo star streams. The method relies on the fact that the motion of the stars perpendicular to a stream from a low-mass progenitor is close to zero when viewed from a non-rotating frame at rest with respect to the Galaxy, and that the deviation from zero is due to the reflex motion of the observer. The procedure we implement here has the advantage of being independent of the Galactic mass distribution. We run a suite of simulations to test the algorithm we have developed, and find that we can recover the input Solar motion to good accuracy with data of the quality that will soon become available from the ESA/Gaia mission.
  • Dwarf galaxies, among the most dark matter dominated structures of our universe, are excellent test-beds for dark matter theories. Unfortunately, mass modelling of these systems suffers from the well documented mass-velocity anisotropy degeneracy. For the case of spherically symmetric systems, we describe a method for non-parametric modelling of the radial and tangential velocity moments. The method is a numerical velocity anisotropy "inversion", with parametric mass models, where the radial velocity dispersion profile, $\sigma_{\mathrm{rr}}^2$ is modeled as a B-spline, and the optimization is a three step process that consists of: (i) an Evolutionary modelling to determine the mass model form and the best B-spline basis to represent $\sigma_{\mathrm{rr}}^2$; (ii) an optimization of the smoothing parameters; (iii) a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis to determine the physical parameters. The mass-anisotropy degeneracy is reduced into mass model inference, irrespective of kinematics. We test our method using synthetic data. Our algorithm constructs the best kinematic profile and discriminates between competing dark matter models. We apply our method to the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Using a King brightness profile and testing various dark matter mass models, our model inference favours a simple mass-follows-light system. We find that the anisotropy profile of Fornax is tangential ($\beta(r) < 0$) and we estimate a total mass of $M_{\text{tot}} = 1.613 ^{+0.050}_{-0.075} \times 10^8 \, \text{M}_{\odot}$, and a mass-to-light ratio of $\Upsilon_V = 8.93 ^{+0.32}_{-0.47} \, (\text{M}_{\odot}/\text{L}_{\odot})$. The algorithm we present is a robust and computationally inexpensive method for non-parametric modelling of spherical clusters independent of the mass-anisotropy degeneracy.
  • We present the Pristine survey, a new narrow-band photometric survey focused on the metallicity-sensitive Ca H & K lines and conducted in the northern hemisphere with the wide-field imager MegaCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). This paper reviews our overall survey strategy and discusses the data processing and metallicity calibration. Additionally we review the application of these data to the main aims of the survey, which are to gather a large sample of the most metal-poor stars in the Galaxy, to further characterise the faintest Milky Way satellites, and to map the (metal-poor) substructure in the Galactic halo. The current Pristine footprint comprises over 1,000 deg2 in the Galactic halo ranging from b~30 to 78 and covers many known stellar substructures. We demonstrate that, for SDSS stellar objects, we can calibrate the photometry at the 0.02-magnitude level. The comparison with existing spectroscopic metallicities from SDSS/SEGUE and LAMOST shows that, when combined with SDSS broad-band g and i photometry, we can use the CaHK photometry to infer photometric metallicities with an accuracy of ~0.2 dex from [Fe/H]=-0.5 down to the extremely metal-poor regime ([Fe/H]<-3.0). After the removal of various contaminants, we can efficiently select metal-poor stars and build a very complete sample with high purity. The success rate of uncovering [Fe/H]SEGUE<-3.0 stars among [Fe/H]Pristine<-3.0 selected stars is 24% and 85% of the remaining candidates are still very metal poor ([Fe/H]<-2.0). We further demonstrate that Pristine is well suited to identify the very rare and pristine Galactic stars with [Fe/H]<-4.0, which can teach us valuable lessons about the early Universe.
  • The recently discovered vast thin plane of dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) adds to the mystery of the small scale distribution of the Local Group's galaxy population. Such well defined planar structures are apparently rare occurrences in cold dark matter cosmological simulations, and we lack a coherent explanation of their formation and existence. In this paper, we explore the long-term survivability of thin planes of dwarfs in galactic halos, focusing, in particular, on systems mimicking the observed Andromeda distribution. The key results show that, in general, planes of dwarf galaxies are fragile, sensitive to the shape of the dark matter halo and other perturbing effects. In fact, long lived planes of satellites only exist in polar orbits in spherical dark matter halos, presenting a challenge to the observed Andromeda plane which is significantly tilted with respect to the optical disk. Our conclusion is that, in standard cosmological models, planes of satellites are generally short lived, and hence we must be located at a relatively special time in the evolution of the Andromeda Plane, lucky enough to see its coherent pattern.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the structural properties and luminosities of the 23 dwarf spheroidal galaxies that fall within the footprint of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). These dwarf galaxies represent the large majority of Andromeda's known satellite dwarf galaxies and cover a wide range in luminosity ($-11.6<M_V<-5.8$ or $10^{4.2}< L <10^{6.5} L_\odot$) and surface brightness ($25.1<\mu_0<29.3$ mag/arcsec$^2$). We confirm most previous measurements, but find And XIX to be significantly larger than before ($r_h=3065^{+1065}_{-935}$ pc, $M_V=-10.1^{+0.8}_{-0.4}$) and cannot derive parameters for And XXVII as it is likely not a bound stellar system. We also significantly revise downward the luminosities of And~XV and And~XVI, which are now $M_V\sim-7.5$ or $L\sim10^5 L_\odot$. Finally, we provide the first detailed analysis of Cas II/And XXX, a fairly faint system ($M_V=-8.0^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$) of typical size ($r_h=270\pm50$ pc), located in close proximity to the two bright elliptical dwarf galaxies NGC 147 & 185. Combined with the set of homogeneous distances published in an earlier contribution, our analysis dutifully tracks all relevant sources of uncertainty in the determination of the properties of the dwarf galaxies from the PAndAS photometric catalogue. We further publish the posterior probability distribution functions of all the parameters we fit for in the form of MCMC chains available online; these inputs should be used in any analysis that aims to remain truthful to the data and properly account for covariance between parameters.
  • As part of the Z-PAndAS Keck II DEIMOS survey of resolved stars in our neighboring galaxy, Andromeda (M31), we have built up a unique data set of measured velocities and chemistries for thousands of stars in the Andromeda stellar halo, particularly probing its rich and complex substructure. In this contribution, we will discuss the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and how there is no observational evidence for a difference in the evolutionary histories of those found on and off M31's vast plane of satellites. We will also discuss a possible extension to the most significant merger event in M31 - the Giant Southern Stream - and how we can use this feature to refine our understanding of M31's mass profile, and its complex evolution.
  • We present a renewed look at M31's Giant Stellar Stream along with the nearby structures Stream C and Stream D, exploiting a new algorithm capable of fitting to the red giant branch (RGB) of a structure in both colour and magnitude space. Using this algorithm, we are able to generate probability distributions in distance, metallicity and RGB width for a series of subfields spanning these structures. Specifically, we confirm a distance gradient of approximately 20 kpc per degree along a 6 degree extension of the Giant Stellar Stream, with the farthest subfields from M31 lying ~ 120 kpc more distant than the inner-most subfields. Further, we find a metallicity that steadily increases from -0.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} dex to -0.2^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex along the inner half of the stream before steadily dropping to a value of -1.0^{+0.2}_{-0.2} dex at the farthest reaches of our coverage. The RGB width is found to increase rapidly from 0.4^{+0.1}_{-0.1} dex to 1.1^{+0.2}_{-0.1} dex in the inner portion of the stream before plateauing and decreasing marginally in the outer subfields of the stream. In addition, we estimate Stream C to lie at a distance between 794 and 862 kpc and Stream D between 758 kpc and 868 kpc. We estimate the median metallicity of Stream C to lie in the range -0.7 to -1.6 dex and a metallicity of -1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.2} dex for Stream D. RGB widths for the two structures are estimated to lie in the range 0.4 to 1.2 dex and 0.3 to 0.7 dex respectively. In total, measurements are obtained for 19 subfields along the Giant Stellar Stream, 4 along Stream C, 5 along Stream D and 3 general M31 spheroid fields for comparison. We thus provide a higher resolution coverage of the structures in these parameters than has previously been available in the literature.
  • We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (<v_r>=-383.7^{+3.0}_{-3.3} km/s) that translates to <v_{r,gsr}> ~ -264 km/s and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from 4.4^{+2.8}_{-2.0} km/s in the central 2' to 14.1^{+5.8}_{-4.2} km/s outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be \sigma_{vr}=9.9^{+3.2}_{-2.2} km/s. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity <[Fe/H]>=-2.6+/-0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.
  • We present the first spectroscopic analysis of the faint and compact stellar system Draco II (Dra II, M_V=-2.9+/-0.8, r_h=19^{+8}_{-6} pc), recently discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3{\pi} survey. The observations, conducted with DEIMOS on the Keck II telescope, establish some of its basic characteristics: the velocity data reveal a narrow peak with 9 member stars at a systemic heliocentric velocity <v_r>=-347.6^{+1.7}_{-1.8} km/s, thereby confirming Dra II is a satellite of the Milky Way; we infer a velocity dispersion with \sigma_{vr}=2.9+/-2.1 km/s (<8.4 km/s at the 95% confidence level), which implies log_{10}(M_{1/2})=5.5^{+0.4}_{-0.6} and log_{10}((M/L)_{1/2})=2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.8}, in Solar units; furthermore, very weak Calcium triplet lines in the spectra of the high signal-to-noise member stars imply [Fe/H]<-2.1, whilst variations in the line strengths of two stars with similar colours and magnitudes suggest a metallicity spread in Dra II. These new data cannot clearly discriminate whether Draco II is a star cluster or amongst the faintest, most compact, and closest dwarf galaxies. However, the sum of the three --- individually inconclusive --- pieces of evidence presented here, seems to favour the dwarf galaxy interpretation.
  • We present an analysis of wide-field photometric surveys of the Palomar 5 globular cluster and its stellar stream, based on g- and r-band measures together with narrow-band DDO51 photometry. In this first study, we use the deep (g,r) data to measure the incidence of gaps and peaks along the stream. Examining the star-counts profile of the stream plus contaminating populations, we find no evidence for significant under-densities, and find only a single significant over-density. This is at odds with earlier studies based on matched-filter maps derived from shallower SDSS data if the contaminating population possesses plausible spatial properties. The lack of substantial sub-structure along the stream may be used in future dynamical simulations to examine the incidence of dark matter sub-halos in the Galactic halo. We also present a measurement of the relative distances along the stream which we use to create the deepest wide-field map of this system to date.
  • NGC147, NGC185 and CassiopeiaII (CassII) have similar positions in the sky, distances and measured line of sight velocities. This proximity in phase space suggests that these three satellites of M31 form a subgroup within the Local Group. Nevertheless, the differences in their star formation history and interstellar medium, and the recent discovery of a stellar stream in NGC~147, combined with the lack of tidal features in the other two satellites, are all indications of complex and diverse interactions between M31 and these three satellites. We use a genetic algorithm to explore the different orbits that these satellites can have and select six sets of orbits that could best explain the observational features of the NGC147, NGC185 and CassII satellites. The parameters of these orbits are then used as a starting point for N-body simulations. We present models for which NGC147, NGC185 and CassII are a bound group for a total time of at least one Gyr but still undergo different interactions with M31 and as a result NGC147 has a clear stellar stream whereas the other two satellites have no significant tidal features. This result shows that it is possible to find solutions that reproduce the contrasting properties of the satellites and for which NGC147-NGC185-CassII have been gravitationally bound.
  • We present deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys observations of the stellar populations in two fields lying at 20 and 23 kpc from the centre of M31 along the south-west semi-major axis. These data enable the construction of colour-magnitude diagrams reaching the oldest main-sequence turn-offs (~13 Gyr) which, when combined with another field at 25 kpc from our previous work, we use to derive the first precision constraints on the spatially-resolved star formation history of the M31 disc. The star formation rates exhibit temporal as well as field-to-field variations, but are generally always within a factor of two of their time average. There is no evidence of inside-out growth over the radial range probed. We find a median age of ~7.5 Gyr, indicating that roughly half of the stellar mass in the M31 outer disc was formed before z ~ 1. We also find that the age-metallicity relations (AMRs) are smoothly increasing from [Fe/H]~-0.4 to solar metallicity between 10 and 3 Gyr ago, contrary to the flat AMR of the Milky Way disc at a similar number of scale lengths. Our findings provide insight on the roles of stellar feedback and radial migration in the formation and evolution of large disc galaxies.
  • We have recently shown (Ibata et al. 2014) that pairs of satellite galaxies located diametrically opposite each other around their host possess predominantly anti-correlated velocities. This is consistent with a scenario in which $\sim 50$% of satellite galaxies belong to kinematically-coherent rotating planar structures, similar to those detected around the giant galaxies of the Local Group. Here we extend this analysis, examining the incidence of satellites of giant galaxies drawn from an SDSS photometric redshift catalog. We find that there is a $\sim 17$% overabundance ($> 3 \sigma$ significance) of candidate satellites at positions diametrically opposite a spectroscopically confirmed satellite. We show that cosmological simulations do not possess this property when the contamination is included, and that there are in fact, after subtracting contamination, 2 to 3 times more satellites diametrically opposed to a spectroscopically confirmed satellite than at $90\deg$ from it. We also examine the correlation between the satellite pair positions and the orientation of the host galaxy major axis. We find that those satellite pairs with anti-correlated velocities have a strong preference ($\sim 3:1$) to align with the major axis of the host whereas those with correlated velocities display the opposite behavior. This correlation of the satellite alignments appears to be stronger than the well-documented preference of satellites to be located close to the major axis of their host. We finally show that repeating a similar analysis to Ibata et al. (2014) with same-side satellites is generally hard to interpret, but is not inconsistent with our previous results when strong quality-cuts are applied on the sample. All these unexpected correlations strongly suggest that a substantial fraction of satellite galaxies are causally-linked in their formation and evolution.
  • We present the discovery of a faint Milky Way satellite, Laevens 2/Triangulum II, found in the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS 1) 3 pi imaging data and confirmed with follow-up wide-field photometry from the Large Binocular Cameras. The stellar system, with an absolute magnitude of M_V=-1.8 +/-0.5, a heliocentric distance of 30 +2/-2 kpc, and a half-mass radius of 34 +9/-8 pc, shows remarkable similarity to faint, nearby, small satellites such as Willman 1, Segue 1, Segue 2, and Bo\"otes II. The discovery of Laevens 2/Triangulum II further populates the region of parameter space for which the boundary between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters becomes tenuous. Follow-up spectroscopy will ultimately determine the nature of this new satellite, whose spatial location hints at a possible connection with the complex Triangulum-Andromeda stellar structures.
  • The thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the LCDM paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) to their off-plane neighbours. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for 2 on-plane M31 dSphs (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.
  • While wide-field surveys of M31 have revealed much substructure at large radii, understanding the nature and origin of this material is not straightforward from morphology alone. Using deep HST/ACS data, we have derived further constraints in the form of quantitative star formation histories (SFHs) for 14 inner halo fields which sample diverse substructures. In agreement with our previous analysis of colour-magnitude diagram morphologies, we find the resultant behaviours can be broadly separated into two categories. The SFHs of 'disc-like' fields indicate that most of their mass has formed since z~1, with one quarter of the mass formed in the last 5 Gyr. We find 'stream-like' fields to be on average 1.5 Gyr older, with <10 percent of their stellar mass formed within the last 5 Gyr. These fields are also characterised by an age--metallicity relation showing rapid chemical enrichment to solar metallicity by z=1, suggestive of an early-type progenitor. We confirm a significant burst of star formation 2 Gyr ago, discovered in our previous work, in all the fields studied here. The presence of these young stars in our most remote fields suggests that they have not formed in situ but have been kicked-out from through disc heating in the recent past.
  • We present Keck II/DEIMOS spectroscopy of the three distant dwarf galaxies of M31 Lacerta I, Cassiopeia III, and Perseus I, recently discovered within the Pan-STARRS1 3\pi imaging survey. The systemic velocities of the three systems (v_{r,helio} = -198.4 +/- 1.1 km/s, -371.6 +/- 0.7 km/s, and -326 +/- 3 km/s, respectively) confirm that they are satellites of M31. In the case of Lacerta I and Cassiopeia III, the high quality of the data obtained for 126 and 212 member stars, respectively, yields reliable constraints on their global velocity dispersions (\sigma_{vr} = 10.3 +/- 0.9 km/s and 8.4 +/- 0.6 km/s, respectively), leading to dynamical-mass estimates for both of ~4x10^7 Msun within their half-light radius. These translate to V-band mass-to-light ratios of 15^{+12}_{-9} and 8^{+9}_{-5} in solar units. We also use our spectroscopic data to determine the average metallicity of the 3 dwarf galaxies ([Fe/H] = -2.0 +/- 0.1, -1.7 +/- 0.1, and -2.0 +/- 0.2, respectively). All these properties are typical of dwarf galaxy satellites of Andromeda with their luminosity and size.
  • Recent work has shown that both the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies possess the unexpected property that their dwarf satellite galaxies are aligned in thin and kinematically coherent planar structures. It is now important to evaluate the incidence of such planar structures in the larger galactic population, since the Local Group may not be a sufficiently representative environment. Here we report that the measurement of the velocity of pairs of diametrically opposed galaxy satellites provides a means to determine statistically the prevalence of kinematically coherent planar alignments. In the local universe (redshift $z<0.05$), we find that such satellite pairs out to a galactocentric distance of $150$ kpc are preferentially anti-correlated in their velocities (99.994% confidence level), and that the distribution of galaxies in the larger scale environment (beyond 150 kpc and up to $\approx 2$ Mpc) is strongly elongated along the axis joining the inner satellite pair ($>7\sigma$ confidence). Our finding may indicate that co-rotating planes of satellites, similar to that seen around the Andromeda galaxy, are ubiquitous in nature, while their coherent motion also suggests that they are a significant repository of angular momentum on $\sim 100$ kpc scales.
  • A widely employed method for estimating the mass of stellar systems with apparent spherical symmetry is dynamical modelling using the spherically symmetric Jeans equation. Unfortunately this approach suffers from a degeneracy between the assumed mass density and the second order velocity moments. This degeneracy can lead to significantly different predictions for the mass content of the system under investigation, and thus poses a barrier for accurate estimates of the dark matter content of astrophysical systems. In a series of papers we describe an algorithm that removes this degeneracy and allows for unbiased mass estimates of systems of constant or variable mass-to-light ratio. The present contribution sets the theoretical foundation of the method that reconstructs a unique kinematic profile for some assumed free functional form of the mass density. The essence of our method lies in using flexible B-spline functions for the representation of the radial velocity dispersion in the spherically symmetric Jeans equation. We demonstrate our algorithm through an application to synthetic data for the case of an isotropic King model with fixed mass-to-light ratio, recovering excellent fits of theoretical functions to observables and a unique solution. The mass-anisotropy degeneracy is removed to the extent that, for an assumed functional form of the potential and mass density pair $(\Phi,\rho)$, and a given set of line-of-sight velocity dispersion $\sigma_{los}^2$ observables, we recover a unique profile for $\sigma_{rr}^2$ and $\sigma_{tt}^2$. Our algorithm is simple, easy to apply and provides an efficient means to reconstruct the kinematic profile.