• The interstellar medium is a complex 'ecosystem' with gas constituents in the atomic, molecular, and ionized states, dust, magnetic fields, and relativistic particles. The Canadian Galactic Plane Survey has imaged these constituents with angular resolution of the order of arcminutes. This paper presents radio continuum data at 408 MHz over the area 52 degrees < longitude < 193 degrees, -6.5 degrees < latitude < 8.5 degrees, with an extension to latitude = 21 degrees in the range 97 degrees < longitude < 120 degrees, with angular resolution 2.8' x 2.8' cosec(declination). Observations were made with the Synthesis Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey. The calibration of the survey using existing radio source catalogs is described. The accuracy of 408-MHz flux densities from the data is 6%. Information on large structures has been incorporated into the data using the single-antenna survey of Haslam (1982). The paper presents the data, describes how it can be accessed electronically, and gives examples of applications of the data to ISM research.
  • High resolution and sensitivity large-scale radio surveys of the Milky Way are critical in the discovery of very low surface brightness supernova remnants (SNRs), which may constitute a significant portion of the Galactic SNRs still unaccounted for (ostensibly the Missing SNR problem). The overall purpose here is to present the results of a systematic, deep data-mining of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) for faint, extended non-thermal and polarized emission structures that are likely the shells of uncatalogued supernova remnants. We examine 5$\times$5 degree mosaics from the entire 1420 MHz continuum and polarization dataset of the CGPS after removing unresolved point sources and subsequently smoothing them. Newly revealed extended emission objects are compared to similarly-prepared CGPS 408 MHz continuum mosaics, as well as to source-removed mosaics from various existing radio surveys at 4.8 GHz, 2.7 GHz, and 327 MHz, to identify candidates with non-thermal emission characteristics. We integrate flux densities at each frequency to characterise the radio spectra behaviour of these candidates. We further look for mid- and high-frequency (1420 MHz, 4.8 GHz) ordered polarized emission from the limb brightened shell-like continuum features that the candidates sport. Finally, we use IR and optical maps to provide additional backing evidence. Here we present evidence that five new objects, identified as filling all or some of the criteria above, are strong candidates for new SNRs. These five are designated by their Galactic coordinate names G108.5+11.0, G128.5+2.6, G149.5+3.2, G150.8+3.8, and G160.1$-$1.1. These discoveries represent a significant increase in the number of SNRs known in the outer Galaxy second quadrant of longitude (90$^{\circ} \leq \ell \leq $180$^{\circ}$).
  • We report the discovery of the new pulsar wind nebula (PWN) G141.2+5.0 in data observed with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory's Synthesis Telescope at 1420 MHz. The new PWN has a diameter of about 3.5', which translates at a distance of 4.0 kpc to a spatial extent of about 4 pc. It displays a radio spectral index of $\alpha\approx -0.7$, similar to the PWN G76.9+1.1. G141.2+5.0 is highly polarized up to 40% with an average of 15% in the 1420 MHz data. It is located in the centre of a small spherical HI bubble, which is expanding at a velocity of 6 km/s. The bubble's systemic velocity is -53 km/s and could be the result of the progenitor star's mass loss or the shell-type SNR created by the same supernova explosion in a highly advanced stage. The systemic velocity of the bubble shares the velocity of HI associated with the Cygnus spiral arm, which is seen across the 2nd and 3rd quadrants and an active star-forming arm immediately beyond the Perseus arm. A kinematical distance of 4+/-0.5 kpc is found for G141.2+5.0, similar to the optical distance of the Cygnus arm (3.8+/-1.1 kpc) and its kinematic HI distance (4.4+/-0.6 kpc). G141.2+5.0 represents the first radio PWN discovered in 17 years and the first SNR discovered in the Cygnus spiral arm, which is in stark contrast with the Perseus arm's overwhelming population of shell-type remnants.
  • A VLA Sky Survey of the extragalactic sky at S band (2-4 GHz) with polarization information can uniquely probe the magneto-ionic medium in a wide range of astrophysical environments over cosmic time. For a shallow all-sky survey, we expect to detect over 4 million sources in total intensity $>$ 0.45 mJy beam$^{-1}$ and over 2.2$\times$10$^5$ sources in polarized intensity. With these new observations, we expect to discover new classes of polarized radio sources in very turbulent astrophysical environments and those with extreme values of Faraday depth. Moreover, by determining reliable Faraday depths and by modeling depolarization effects, we can derive properties of the magneto-ionic medium associated with AGNs, absorption line systems and galaxies, addressing the following unresolved questions: (1) What is the covering fraction, the degree of turbulence and the origin of absorption line systems? (2) What is the thermal content in AGNs and radio galaxies? (3) How do AGNs and galaxies evolve over cosmic time? (4) What causes the increase in percentage polarization with decreasing flux densities at the low flux density end of the polarized source count? (5) What is the growth rate of large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies?
  • A growing number of researchers present evidence that the pulsar wind nebula 3C58 is much older than predicted by its proposed connection to the historical supernova of A.D. 1181. There is also a great diversity of arguments. The strongest of these arguments rely heavily on the assumed distance of 3.2 kpc determined with HI absorption measurements. This publication aims at determining a more accurate distance for 3C58 and re-evaluating the arguments for a larger age. I have re-visited the distance determination of 3C58 based on new HI data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey and our recent improvements in the knowledge of the rotation curve of the outer Milky Way Galaxy. I have also used newly determined distances to objects in the neighbourhood, which are based on direct measurements by trigonometric parallax. I have derived a new more reliable distance estimate of 2 kpc for 3C58. This makes the connection between the pulsar wind nebula and the historical event from A.D. 1181 once again much more viable.
  • We report on a comparison between 21 cm rotation measure (RM) and the optically-thin atomic hydrogen column density (N_HI) measured towards unresolved extragalactic sources in the Galactic plane of the northern sky. HI column densities integrated to the Galactic edge are measured immediately surrounding each of nearly 2000 sources in 1-arcminute 21 cm line data, and are compared to RMs observed from polarized emission of each source. RM data are binned in column-density bins 4x10^20 cm^-2 wide, and one observes a strong relationship between the number of hydrogen atoms in a 1 cm^2 column through the plane and the mean RM along the same line-of-sight and path length. The relationship is linear over one order of magnitude (from 0.8-14x10^21 atoms cm^-2) of column densities, with a constant RM/N_HI -23.2+/-2.3 rad m^-2/10^21 atoms cm^-2, and a positive RM of 45.0+/-13.8 rad m^-2 in the presence of no atomic hydrogen. This slope is used to calculate a mean volume-averaged magnetic field in the 2nd quadrant of <B_||>~1.0+/-0.1 micro-Gauss directed away from the Sun, assuming an ionization fraction of 8% (consistent with the WNM). The remarkable consistency between this field and <B>=1.2 micro-Gauss found with the same RM sources and a Galactic model of dispersion measures suggests that electrons in the partially ionized WNM are mainly responsible for pulsar dispersion measures, and thus the partially-ionized WNM is the dominant form of the magneto-ionic interstellar medium.
  • We report on the discovery of two supernova remnants (SNRs) designated G152.4-2.1 and G190.9-2.2, using Canadian Galactic Plane Survey data. The aims of this paper are, first, to present evidence that favours the classification of both sources as SNRs, and, second, to describe basic parameters (integrated flux density, spectrum, and polarization) as well as properties (morphology, line-of-sight velocity, distance and physical size) to facilitate and motivate future observations. Spectral and polarization parameters are derived from multiwavelength data from existing radio surveys carried out at wavelengths between 6 and 92cm. In particular for the source G152.4-2.1 we also use new observations at 11cm done with the Effelsberg 100m telescope. The interstellar medium around the discovered sources is analyzed using 1-arcminute line data from neutral hydrogen (HI) and 45-arcsecond 12CO(J=1-0). G152.4-2.1 is a barrel shaped SNR with two opposed radio-bright polarized flanks on the North and South. The remnant, which is elongated along the Galactic plane is evolving in a more-or-less uniform medium. G190.9-2.2 is also a shell-type remnant with East and West halves elongated perpendicular to the plane, and is evolving within a low-density region bounded by dense neutral hydrogen in the North and South, and molecular (12CO) clouds in the East and West. The integrated radio continuum spectral indices are -0.65+/-0.05 and -0.66+/-0.05 for G152.4-2.1 and G190.9-2.2 respectively. Both SNRs are approximately 1 kpc distant, with G152.4-2.1 being larger (32x30 pc in diameter) than G190.9-2.2 (18x16 pc). These two remnants are the lowest surface brightness SNRs yet catalogued at 5x10^-23 W m^-2 Hz^-1 sr^-1.
  • In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, several next-generation radio telescopes and upgrades are already being built around the world. These include APERTIF (The Netherlands), ASKAP (Australia), eMERLIN (UK), VLA (USA), e-EVN (based in Europe), LOFAR (The Netherlands), Meerkat (South Africa), and the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Each of these new instruments has different strengths, and coordination of surveys between them can help maximise the science from each of them. A radio continuum survey is being planned on each of them with the primary science objective of understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies over cosmic time, and the cosmological parameters and large-scale structures which drive it. In pursuit of this objective, the different teams are developing a variety of new techniques, and refining existing ones. Here we describe these projects, their science goals, and the technical challenges which are being addressed to maximise the science return.
  • The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Deep Field polarization study has been matched with the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic survey of the European Large Area Infrared Space Observatory Survey North 1 field. We have used VLA observations with a total intensity rms of 87 microJy beam^-1 to match SWIRE counterparts to the radio sources. Infrared color analysis of our radio sample shows that the majority of polarized sources are elliptical galaxies with an embedded active galactic nucleus. Using available redshift catalogs, we found 429 radio sources of which 69 are polarized with redshifts in the range of 0.04 < z <3.2. We find no correlation between redshift and percentage polarization for our sample. However, for polarized radio sources, we find a weak correlation between increasing percentage polarization and decreasing luminosity.
  • The DRAO ST was used for the past 15 years as the primary instrument for the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey. This has been a spectacularly successful project, advancing our understanding of the Milky Way Galaxy through panoramic imaging of the main constituents of the Interstellar Medium. Observations for the CGPS are now complete and the Synthesis Telescope at DRAO has returned to proposal-driven mode. The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory invites astronomers to apply for observing time with the DRAO Synthesis Telescope. The DRAO ST provides radio observations of atomic hydrogen and radio continuum emission, including the polarized signal, with high spatial dynamic range and arcminute resolution. Imaging techniques developed for the CGPS have made the telescope into a front-line instrument for wide-field imaging, particularly of polarized emission. We will discuss telescope characteristics, show examples of data to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the ST, and explain where and how to apply for observing time.
  • There is a growing community of astronomers presenting evidence that the pulsar wind nebula 3C58 is much older than the connection with the historical supernova of A.D 1181 would indicate. Most of the strong evidence against a young age for 3C58 relies heavily on the assumed distance of 3.2 kpc determined with HI absorption measurements. I have revisited this distance determination based on new HI data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey and added newly determined distances to objects in the neighbourhood, which are based on direct measurements by trigonometric parallax. This leads to a new more reliable distance estimate of 2 kpc for 3C58 and makes the connection between the pulsar wind nebula and the historical event from A.D. 1181 once again much more compelling.
  • We present results of deep polarization imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 square degrees centered at RA = 16h 14m and DEC = 54d 56', has an angular resolution of 42" x 62" at the field center, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 microJy/beam in Stokes I and 45 microJy/beam in Stokes Q and U. We detect 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarization. We present the Euclidean-normalized polarized differential source counts down to 400 microJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher degree of fractional polarization at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources, confirming an earlier result. We find that the majority of our polarized sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarization and spectral index. We also matched deep field sources to counterparts in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters catalogue. Of the polarized sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarization show such structure. The median fractional polarization is for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. The polarized radio sources in our deep field are predominantly those sources which are resolved and show the highest degrees of fractional polarization, indicating that the lobe dominated structure may be the source of the highly polarized sources. These resolved radio galaxies dominate the polarized source counts at P_0 = sqrt(Q^2 + U^2) < 3 mJy.
  • We present 1420 MHz polarization images of a 2.5 X 2.5 degree region around the planetary nebula (PN) Sh 2-216. The images are taken from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). An arc of low polarized intensity appears prominently in the north-east portion of the visible disk of Sh 2-216, coincident with the optically identified interaction region between the PN and the interstellar medium (ISM). The arc contains structural variations down to the ~1 arcminute resolution limit in both polarized intensity and polarization angle. Several polarization-angle "knots" appear along the arc. By comparison of the polarization angles at the centers of the knots and the mean polarization angle outside Sh 2-216, we estimate the rotation measure (RM) through the knots to be -43 +/- 10 rad/m^2. Using this estimate for the RM and an estimate of the electron density in the shell of Sh 2-216, we derive a line-of-sight magnetic field in the interaction region of 5.0 +/- 2.0 microG. We believe it more likely the observed magnetic field is interstellar than stellar, though we cannot completely dismiss the latter possibility. We interpret our observations via a simple model which describes the ISM magnetic field around Sh 2-216, and comment on the potential use of old PNe as probes of the magnetized ISM.
  • We present new radio continuum and HI images towards the supernova remnants (SNRs) G114.3+0.3, G116.5+1.1, and G116.9+0.2 (CTB 1) taken from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS). We discuss the dynamics of their HI environment and a possible relationship of these SNRs with each other. We discovered patches of HI emission surrounding G114.3+0.3 indicating a location in the Local arm at a distance of about 700 pc in contrast to previous publications which proposed a Perseus arm location. The other two SNRs have radial velocities of -17 km/s (G116.5+1.1) and -27 km/s (CTB 1) according to related HI. However, the structure of the HI and its dynamics in velocity space suggest a possible relation between them, placing both remnants at a distance of about 1.6 kpc. CTB 1 appears to be embedded in an HI feature which is moving as a whole towards us with a velocity of about 10 km/s. Furthermore, the off-centered location of CTB 1 in a large HI bubble indicates that the so-called breakout region of the remnant is in fact due to its expansion towards the low density interior of this bubble. We believe that the progenitor star of CTB 1 was an early B or O-type star shaping its environment with a strong stellar wind in which case it exploded in a Ib or Ic event.
  • By comparing radial velocities of radio bright compact HII regions with their HI absorption profiles, we discovered expanding shells of neutral hydrogen around them. These shells are revealed by absorption of the radio continuum emission from the HII regions at velocities indicating greater distances than the observed radial velocity. We believe that these shells are shock zones at the outer edge of the expanding ionized region. Additionally we found evidence for a velocity inversion inside the Perseus arm caused by a spiral shock, which results in a deep absorption line in the spectra of compact HII regions behind it.
  • We conducted a study of the environment around the supernova remnant CTB109. We found that the SNR is part of a large complex of HII regions extending over an area of 400 pc along the Galactic plane at a distance of about 3 kpc at the closer edge of the Perseus spiral arm. At this distance CTB109 has a diameter of about 24 pc. We demonstrated that including spiral shocks in the distance estimation is an ultimate requirement to determine reliable distances to objects located in the Perseus arm. The most likely explanation for the high concentration of HII regions and SNRs is that the star formation in this part of the Perseus arm is triggered by the spiral shock.
  • We report the detection of a ring like HI structure toward l=90.0, b=2.8 with a velocity of v_LSR=-99 km/s. This velocity implies a distance of d=13 kpc, corresponding to a Galactocentric radius of R_gal=15 kpc. The l-v_LSR diagram implies an expansion velocity of v_exp ~ 15 km/s for the shell. The structure has an oblate, irregular shell-like appearance which surrounds weak infrared emission as seen in the 60 micrometer IRAS data. At a distance of 13 kpc the size of the object is about 110 x 220 pc and placed 500 pc above the Galactic plane with a mass of 1e5 solar mass. An expanding shell with such a high mass and diameter cannot be explained by a single supernova explosion or by a single stellar wind bubble. We interpret the structure as a relic of a distant stellar activity region powered by the joint action of strong stellar winds from early type stars and supernova explosions.
  • We present new, high resolution 1420 and 408 MHz continuum images and HI and 12CO (J=1-0) spectral line maps of the diffuse supernova remnant CTB104A (G93.7-0.3). Analysis of the complex continuum emission reveals no significant spectral index variations across the remnant. Three prominences around CTB104A are found to be related to the SNR, while one extension to the east is identified as an HII region associated with a background molecular shell. Small scale polarization and rotation measure (RM) structures are turbulent in nature, but we find a well-ordered RM gradient across the remnant, extending from southeast to northwest. This gradient does not agree with the direction of the global Galactic magnetic field, but does agree with a large-scale RM anomaly inferred from rotation measure data by Cleg et al. (1992). We show that the observed morphology of CTB104A is consistent with expansion in a uniform magnetic field, and this is supported by the observed RM distribution. By modeling the RM gradient with a simple compression model we have determined the magnetic field strength within the remnant as Bo ~ 2.3 micro G. We have identified signatures of the interaction of CTB104A with the surrounding neutral material, and determined its distance, from the kinematics of the HI structure encompassing the radio emission, as 1.5 kpc. We also observed clear breaks in the HI shell that correspond well to the positions of two of the prominences, indicating regions where hot gas is escaping from the interior of the SNR.
  • We propose that the pulsar nebula associated with the pulsar J2229+6114 and the supernova remnant (SNR) G106.3+2.7 are the result of the same supernova explosion. The whole structure is located at the edge of an HI bubble with extended regions of molecular gas inside. The radial velocities of both the atomic hydrogen and the molecular material suggest a distance of 800 pc. At this distance the SNR is 14 pc long and 6 pc wide. Apparently the bubble was created by the stellar wind and supernova explosions of a group of stars in its center which also triggered the formation of the progenitor star of G106.3+2.7. The progenitor star exploded at or close to the current position of the pulsar, which is at one end of the SNR rather than at its center. The expanding shock wave of the supernova explosion created a comet shaped supernova remnant by running into dense material and then breaking out into the inner part of the HI bubble. A synchrotron nebula with a shell-like structure (the ``Boomerang'') of length 0.8 pc was created by the pulsar wind interacting with the dense ambient medium. The expanding shock wave created an HI shell of mass 0.4 Msun around this nebula by ionizing the atomic hydrogen in its vicinity.