• One of the fundamental problems in the realm of peer-to-peer systems is that of determining their service capacities. In this paper, we focus on P2P scalability issues and propose models to compute the achievable throughput under distinct policies for selecting both peers and blocks. From these models, we obtain novel insights on the behavior of P2P swarming systems that motivate new mechanisms for publishers and peers to improve the overall performance. In particular, we obtain operational regions for swarm system. In addition, we show that system capacity significantly increases if publishers adopt the most deprived peer selection and peers reduce their service rates when they have all the file blocks but one.
  • Peer-to-peer swarming is one of the \emph{de facto} solutions for distributed content dissemination in today's Internet. By leveraging resources provided by clients, swarming systems reduce the load on and costs to publishers. However, there is a limit to how much cost savings can be gained from swarming; for example, for unpopular content peers will always depend on the publisher in order to complete their downloads. In this paper, we investigate this dependence. For this purpose, we propose a new metric, namely \emph{swarm self-sustainability}. A swarm is referred to as self-sustaining if all its blocks are collectively held by peers; the self-sustainability of a swarm is the fraction of time in which the swarm is self-sustaining. We pose the following question: how does the self-sustainability of a swarm vary as a function of content popularity, the service capacity of the users, and the size of the file? We present a model to answer the posed question. We then propose efficient solution methods to compute self-sustainability. The accuracy of our estimates is validated against simulation. Finally, we also provide closed-form expressions for the fraction of time that a given number of blocks is collectively held by peers.