• The carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are largely unidentified molecules ubiquitously present in the interstellar medium (ISM). After decades of study, two strong and possibly three weak near-infrared DIBs have recently been attributed to the C60+ fullerene based on observational and laboratory measurements. There is great promise for the identification of the over 400 other known DIBs, as this result could provide chemical hints towards other possible carriers. In an effort to systematically study the properties of the DIB carriers, we have initiated a new large-scale observational survey: the ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES). The main objective is to build on and extend existing DIB surveys to make a major step forward in characterising the physical and chemical conditions for a statistically significant sample of interstellar lines-of-sight, with the goal to reverse-engineer key molecular properties of the DIB carriers. EDIBLES is a filler Large Programme using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. It is designed to provide an observationally unbiased view of the presence and behaviour of the DIBs towards early-spectral-type stars whose lines-of-sight probe the diffuse-to-translucent ISM. Such a complete dataset will provide a deep census of the atomic and molecular content, physical conditions, chemical abundances and elemental depletion levels for each sightline. Achieving these goals requires a homogeneous set of high-quality data in terms of resolution (R ~ 70000 -- 100000), sensitivity (S/N up to 1000 per resolution element), and spectral coverage (305--1042 nm), as well as a large sample size (100+ sightlines). In this first paper the goals, objectives and methodology of the EDIBLES programme are described and an initial assessment of the data is provided.
  • Three-dimensional maps of the Galactic interstellar medium are general astrophysical tools. Reddening maps may be based on the inversion of color excess measurements for individual target stars or on statistical methods using stellar surveys. Three-dimensional maps based on diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) have also been produced. All methods benefit from the advent of massive surveys and from Gaia data. We first updated our previous local dust maps based on a regularized Bayesian inversion of individual color excess data by replacing Hipparcos or photometric distances with Gaia Data Release 1 values when available. Secondly, we complemented this database with a series of ~5,000 color excess values estimated from the strength of the lambda 15273 DIB toward stars from SDSS/APOGEE, possessing a Gaia parallax. Third, we computed a low-resolution map based on a grid of Pan-STARRS reddening measurements by means of a new hierarchical technique and used this map as the prior distribution during the inversion of the two other datasets. Here we present a first attempt to combine different datasets and methods to improve the local maps. The use of Gaia parallaxes introduces significant changes in some areas and globally increases the compactness of the structures. Additional DIB-based data make it possible to assign distances to clouds located behind closer opaque structures and do not introduce contradictory information for the close structures. A more realistic prior distribution instead of a plane-parallel homogeneous distribution helps better define the structures. We validated the results through comparisons with other maps and with soft X-ray data. Our study demonstrates that the combination of various tracers is a potential tool for more accurate maps. An online tool makes it possible to retrieve maps and reddening estimations (http://stilism.obspm.fr).
  • Aims. A recent debate on the decade-long stability of the interstellar He flow vector, and in particular the flow longitude, has prompted us to check for any variability in the interstellar H flow vector as observed by the SWAN instrument on board SOHO. Methods. We used a simple model-independent method to determine the interstellar H flow longitude, based on the parallax effects induced on the Lyman-{\alpha} intensity measured by SWAN following the satellite motion around the Sun. Results. Our results show that the interstellar H flow vector longitude does not vary significantly from an average value of 252.9$^{\circ}$ $\pm$ 1.4$^{\circ}$ throughout the 20-year span of the SWAN dataset, further strengthening the arguments for the stability of the interstellar gas flow.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • Inversion of interstellar gas or dust columns measured along the path to stars distributed in distance and direction allows reconstructing the distribution of interstellar matter (ISM) in 3D. A low resolution IS dust map based on the reddening of 23,000 stars illustrates the potential of future maps. It reveals the location of the main IS clouds within $\sim$1kpc and, owing to biases towards weakly reddened targets, regions devoid of IS matter. It traces the Local Bubble and neighboring cavities, including a giant, $\geq$1000 pc long cavity located beyond the so-called $\beta$CMa tunnel, bordered by the main constituents of the Gould belt (GB), the rotating and expanding ring of clouds and young stars, inclined by $\sim$ 20$^{\circ}$ to the galactic plane. From comparison with diffuse X-ray background and absorption data it appears that the giant cavity is filled with warm, ionized and dust-poor gas in addition to million K gas. This set of structures must reflect the main events that occurred in the past. It has been suggested that the Cretaceus-Tertiary mass extinction may be due to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the massive globular cluster (GC) 47 Tuc during its close encounter with the Sun $\sim$70 Myrs ago. Given the mass, speed and size of 47 Tuc, wherever it crossed the Galactic plane it must have produced at the crossing site significant dynamical effects on the disk stars and IS clouds, and triggered star formation. Interestingly, first-order estimates suggest that the GB dynamics and age could match the consequences of the cluster crossing. Additionally, the giant ionized, dust-free cavity could be related to an intense flux of hard radiation, and dust-gas decoupling after the burst could explain the high variability and pattern of the D/H ratio in the nearby gaseous ISM. Future Gaia data should confirm or dismiss this hypothesis.
  • Context. Using observations to deduce dust properties, grain size distribution, and physical conditions in molecular clouds is a highly degenerate problem. Aims. The coreshine phenomenon, a scattering process at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m that dominates absorption, has revealed its ability to explore the densest parts of clouds. We want to use this effect to constrain the dust parameters. The goal is to investigate to what extent grain growth (at constant dust mass) inside molecular clouds is able to explain the coreshine observations. We aim to find dust models that can explain a sample of Spitzer coreshine data. We also look at the consistency with near-infrared data we obtained for a few clouds. Methods. We selected four regions with a very high occurrence of coreshine cases: Taurus-Perseus, Cepheus, Chameleon and L183/L134. We built a grid of dust models and investigated the key parameters to reproduce the general trend of surface bright- nesses and intensity ratios of both coreshine and near-infrared observations with the help of a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. The grid parameters allow to investigate the effect of coagulation upon spherical grains up to 5 $\mu$m in size derived from the DustEm diffuse interstellar medium grains. Fluffiness (porosity or fractal degree), ices, and a handful of classical grain size distributions were also tested. We used the near- and mostly mid-infrared intensity ratios as strong discriminants between dust models. Results. The determination of the background field intensity at each wavelength is a key issue. In particular, an especially strong background field explains why we do not see coreshine in the Galactic plane at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m. For starless cores, where detected, the observed 4.5 $\mu$m / 3.6 $\mu$m coreshine intensity ratio is always lower than $\sim$0.5 which is also what we find in the models for the Taurus-Perseus and L183 directions. Embedded sources can lead to higher fluxes (up to four times greater than the strongest starless core fluxes) and higher coreshine ratios (from 0.5 to 1.1 in our selected sample). Normal interstellar radiation field conditions are sufficient to find suitable grain models at all wavelengths for starless cores. The standard interstellar grains are not able to reproduce observations and, due to the multi-wavelength approach, only a few grain types meet the criteria set by the data. Porosity does not affect the flux ratios while the fractal dimension helps to explain coreshine ratios but does not seem able to reproduce near-infrared observations without a mix of other grain types. Conclusions. Combined near- and mid-infrared wavelengths confirm the potential to reveal the nature and size distribution of dust grains. Careful assessment of the environmental parameters (interstellar and background fields, embedded or nearby reddened sources) is required to validate this new diagnostic.
  • We update two kinds of results obtained with the SWAN instrument on board SOHO. First, we use H cell data recorded in 2001 and derive the H flow direction in the same way we performed the study at solar minimum. We compare with the Helium flow and doing so we correct for the coordinate system change between the Ulysses and SOHO mission. The deflection plane we obtain is compatible with the previous result within error bars, confirming the predominant role of the interstellar magnetic field. Secondly, we extend the derivation of solar wind ionization temporal evolution as a function of heliolatitude. The pattern for the present solar minimum is strikingly different from the previous minimum, with a much wider slow solar wind equatorial belt which persists until at least 2008. Comparing with synoptic LASCO/C2 electron densities we infer from a preliminary study that the acceleration of the high speed solar wind occurs at a higher altitude during this minimum, a change expansion models should be able to explain.
  • We have revisited the series of observations recently used to infer a temporal variation of the interstellar helium flow over the last forty years. Concerning the recent IBEX-Lo direct detection of Helium neutrals, there are two types of precise and unambiguous measurements which do not rely on the exact response of the instrument: the count rate maxima as a function of the spin angle, which determines the ecliptic latitude of the flow, and the count rate maxima as a function of IBEX longitude, which determines a tight relationship between the ecliptic longitude of the flow and its velocity far from the Sun. These measurements provide parameters (and couples of parameters in the second case) remarkably similar to the canonical, old values. In contrast, the preferential choice of a lower velocity and higher longitude reported before from IBEX data is based only on the count rate variation (at each spin phase maximum) as a function of the satellite longitude, when drifting across the region of high fluxes. We have examined the consequences of dead time counting effects, and conclude that their inclusion at a realistic level is sufficient to reconcile the data with the old parameters, calling for further investigations. We discuss the analyses of the STEREO pickup ion (PUI) data and argue that the statistical method that has been preferred to infer the neutral flow longitude (instead of the more direct method based on the PUI maximum flux directions), is not appropriate. Moreover, transport effects may have been significant at the very weak solar activity level of 2007-2009, in which case the longitudes of the PUI maxima are only upper limits on the flow longitude. Finally, we found that the use of some flow longitude determinations based on UV glow data are not adequate. At variance with recent conclusions we find no evidence for a temporal variability of the interstellar helium flow.
  • Three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Galactic interstellar matter (ISM) are a potential tool of wide use, however accurate and detailed maps are still lacking. One of the ways to construct the maps is to invert individual distance-limited ISM measurements, a method we have here applied to measurements of stellar color excess in the optical. We have assembled color excess data together with the associated parallax or photometric distances to constitute a catalog of ~ 23,000 sightlines for stars within 2.5 kpc. The photometric data are taken from Stromgren catalogs, the Geneva photometric database, and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey. We also included extinctions derived towards open clusters. We applied, to this color excess dataset, an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach, previously used for mapping at closer distances. We show the dust spatial distribution resulting from the inversion by means of planar cuts through the differential opacity 3D distribution, and by means of 2D maps of the integrated opacity from the Sun up to various distances. The mapping assigns locations to the nearby dense clouds and represents their distribution at the spatial resolution that is allowed by the dataset properties, i.e. of the order of ~10 pc close to the Sun and increasing to ~100 pc beyond 1 kpc. Biases towards nearby and/or weakly extincted stars make this dataset particularly appropriate to map the local and neighboring cavities, and to locate faint, extended nearby clouds, both goals that are difficult or impossible with other mapping methods. The new maps reveal a ~1 kpc wide empty region in the third quadrant in the continuation of the so-called CMa tunnel of the Local Cavity, a cavity that we identify as the Superbubble GSH238+00+09 detected in radio emission maps and that is found to be bounded by the Orion and Vela clouds.
  • This White Paper, submitted to the recent ESA call for science themes to define its future large missions, advocates the need for a transformational leap in our understanding of two key questions in astrophysics: 1) How does ordinary matter assemble into the large scale structures that we see today? 2) How do black holes grow and shape the Universe? Hot gas in clusters, groups and the intergalactic medium dominates the baryonic content of the local Universe. To understand the astrophysical processes responsible for the formation and assembly of these large structures, it is necessary to measure their physical properties and evolution. This requires spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy with a factor 10 increase in both telescope throughput and spatial resolving power compared to currently planned facilities. Feedback from supermassive black holes is an essential ingredient in this process and in most galaxy evolution models, but it is not well understood. X-ray observations can uniquely reveal the mechanisms launching winds close to black holes and determine the coupling of the energy and matter flows on larger scales. Due to the effects of feedback, a complete understanding of galaxy evolution requires knowledge of the obscured growth of supermassive black holes through cosmic time, out to the redshifts where the first galaxies form. X-ray emission is the most reliable way to reveal accreting black holes, but deep survey speed must improve by a factor ~100 over current facilities to perform a full census into the early Universe. The Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics (Athena+) mission provides the necessary performance (e.g. angular resolution, spectral resolution, survey grasp) to address these questions and revolutionize our understanding of the Hot and Energetic Universe. These capabilities will also provide a powerful observatory to be used in all areas of astrophysics.
  • Stellar spectroscopic surveys may bring useful statistical information on the links between Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) and interstellar environment. DIB databases can also be used as a complementary tool for locating interstellar (IS) clouds. Our goal is to develop fully automated methods of DIB measurements to be applied to extensive data from stellar surveys. We present a method appropriate for early-type nearby stars, its application to high-resolution spectra of 130 targets recorded with ESO FEROS spectrograph, and comparisons with other determinations. Using a DIB average profile deduced from the most reddened stars, we performed an automated fitting of a combination of a smooth stellar continuum, the DIB profile, and, when necessary, a synthetic telluric transmission. Measurements are presented for 16 DIBs in the optical domain that could be extracted automatically: 4726.8, 4762.6, 4963.9, 5780.4, 5797.1, 5849.8, 6089.8, 6196.0, 6203.0-6204.5, 6269.8, 6283.8, 6379.3, 6445.3, 6613.6, 6660.7, and 6699.3 {\AA}.
  • Interstellar diffuse bands are usually extracted from hot star spectra because they are characterized by smooth continua. It introduces a strong limitation on the number of available targets, and reduces potential studies of the IS matter and the use of absorptions for cloud mapping. We have developed a new automatic fitting method appropriate to interstellar absorptions in spectra of cool stars that possess stellar atmospheric parameters. We applied this method to the extraction of three DIBs in high resolution VLT FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra of red clump stars from the bulge. By combining all stellar synthetic spectra, HITRAN-LBLRTM atmospheric transmission spectra and diffuse band empirical absorption profiles, we determine the 6196, 6204, and 6284 A DIB strength toward the 219 target stars and discuss the sources of uncertainties. In order to test the sensitivity of the DIB extraction, we intercompare the three results and compare the DIB equivalent widths with the reddening derived from an independent extinction map based on OGLE photometric data. Most stellar spectra could be well reproduced by the composite stellar, atmospheric and interstellar models. Measurement uncertainties on the EWs are smaller for the broad and strong 6284 A DIB, and are of the order of 10-15%. Uncertainties on the two narrow and weaker DIBs are larger, as expected, and found to be highly variable from one target to the other. They strongly depend on the radial velocity of the star . DIB-DIB correlations among the three bands demonstrate that a meaningful signal is extracted. For the 6284 and 6204 A DIBs, the star-to-star variability of the equivalent width (EW) also reflects features of the OGLE extinction map...
  • Aims. We study the soft X-ray emission induced by charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar-wind, highly charged ions and neutral atoms of the Martian exosphere. Methods. A 3D multi species hybrid simulation model with improved spatial resolution (130 km) is used to describe the interaction between the solar wind and the Martian neutrals. We calculated velocity and density distributions of the solar wind plasma in the Martian environment with realistic planetary ions description, using spherically symmetric exospheric H and O profiles. Following that, a 3D test-particle model was developed to compute the X-ray emission produced by CX collisions between neutrals and solar wind minor ions. The model results are compared to XMM-Newton observations of Mars. Results. We calculate projected X-ray emission maps for the XMM-Newton observing conditions and demonstrate how the X-ray emission reflects the Martian electromagnetic structure in accordance with the observed X-ray images. Our maps confirm that X-ray images are a powerful tool for the study of solar wind - planetary interfaces. However, the simulation results reveal several quantitative discrepancies compared to the observations. Typical solar wind and neutral coronae conditions corresponding to the 2003 observation period of Mars cannot reproduce the high luminosity or the corresponding very extended halo observed with XMM-Newton. Potential explanations of these discrepancies are discussed.
  • We present a new database of 5780.5 and 6283.8 {\AA} DIB measurements and also study their correlation with the reddening. The database is based on high-resolution, high-quality spectra of early-type nearby stars located in the southern hemisphere at an average distance of 300 pc. Equivalent widths of the two DIBs were determined by means of a realistic continuum fitting and synthetic atmospheric transmissions. For all stars that possess a precise measurement of their color excess, we compare the DIBs and the extinction. We find average linear relationships of the DIBS and the color excess that agree well with those of a previous survey of northern hemisphere stars closer than 550 pc. This similarity shows that there is no significant spatial dependence of the average relationship in the solar neighborhood within $\simeq$ 600 pc. A noticeably different result is our higher degree of correlation of the two DIBs with the extinction. We demonstrate that it is simply due to the lower temperature and intrinsic luminosity of our targets. Using cooler target stars reduces the number of outliers, especially for nearby stars, confirming that the radiation field of UV bright stars has a significant influence on the DIB strength. We have used the cleanest data to compute updated DIB shapes.
  • A detailed 3D distribution of interstellar matter in the solar neighborhood is increasingly necessary. As part of a 3D mapping program, we aim at assigning a precise distance to the high-latitude HI gas in particular the northern part (b \geq 55^{circ}) of the shell associated with the conspicuous radio continuum Loop I. This shell is thought to be the expanding boundary of an interstellar bubble inflated and recently reheated by the strong stellar winds of the nearby Scorpius-Centaurus OB. We recorded high-resolution spectra of 30 A-type target stars located at various distances in the direction of the northern part of Loop I. Interstellar NaI 5889-5895 and CaII K-H 3934-3968 {\AA} are modeled and compared with the HI emission spectra from the LAB Survey. About two-thirds of our stellar spectra possess narrow interstellar lines. Narrow lines are located at the velocity of the main, low-velocity Loop 1 HI shell ([-6,+1] km/s in the LSR). Using Hipparcos distances to the target stars, we show that the closest boundary of the b geq+70^{\circ} part of this low-velocity Loop I arch is located at of 98 \pm 6 pc. The corresponding interval for the lower-latitude part (55^{\circ} \leq b \leq 70^{\circ}) is 95-157 pc. However, since the two structures are apparently connected, the lower limit is more likely. At variance with this shell, the second HI structure, which is characterized by LSR Doppler velocities centered at -30 km/s, is NOT detected in any of the optical spectra. It is located beyond 200 parsecs or totally depleted in NaI and CaII. We discuss these results in the light of spherical expanding shells and show that they are difficult to reconcile with simple geometries and a nearby shell center close to the Plane. Instead, this high-latitude gas seems to extend the inclined local chimney wall to high distances from the Plane.
  • We update the SOHO/SWAN H Lyman-alpha brightness analysis to cover the 1996-2008 time interval. A forward model applied to the intensity maps provides the latitude and time dependence of the interstellar Hydrogen ionisation rate over more than a full solar cycle. The hydrogen ionisation, being almost entirely due to charge-exchange with solar wind ions, reflects closely the solar wind flux. Our results show that the solar wind latitudinal structure during the present solar minimum is strikingly different from the previous minimum, with a much wider slow solar wind equatorial belt which persists until at least the end of 2008. We compute absolute values of the in-ecliptic H ionisation rates using OMNI solar wind data and use them to calibrate our ionisation rates at all heliographic latitudes. We then compare the resulting fluxes with the synoptic LASCO/C2 electron densities at 6 solar radii. The two time-latitude patterns are strikingly similar over all the cycle. This comparison shows that densities at 6 solar radii can be used to infer the solar wind type close to its source, with high (resp. low) densities tracing the slow (resp. fast) solar wind, simply because the density reflects at which altitude occurs the acceleration. The comparison between the two minima suggests that the fast polar wind acceleration occurs at larger distance during the current minimum compared to the previous one. This difference, potentially linked to the magnetic field decrease or(and) the coronal temperature decrease should be reproduced by solar wind expansion models.
  • We present high resolution (R = 114,000) ultraviolet measurements of the interstellar absorption line profiles of the CIV (1550 A) high ionization doublet recorded towards the nearby B2Ve star HD 158427 (d~74pc). These data, which were recorded with the recently re-furbished STIS instrument on the HST, represent the most convincing detection yet of highly ionized CIV absorption that can be associated with interstellar gas located within the boundary of the Local Cavity. Two highly ionized gas clouds at V1 = -24.3 km/s and V2 = -41.3 km/s are revealed in both CIV absorption lines, with the V1 component almost certainly being due to absorption by the Local Interstellar Cloud (d<5pc). Although the observed column densities for both cloud components can be explained by the predictions of current theoretical models of the local interstellar medium, the narrow doppler width of the V2 line-profile (b = 6.8 km/s) indicates an unusually low gas temperature of less than 34,000K for this highly ionized component. It is conjectured that the V2 cloud may be due to an outflow of highly ionized and hot gas from the nearby Loop I superbubble. These new data also indicate that absorption due to highly ionized gas in the Local Cavity can be best described as being 'patchy' in nature.
  • 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the ISM itself to foreground decontamination of the CMB, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Stromgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6,000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion. We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds with 250 pc. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. We also compare the opacity distribution with the 3D distribution of interstellar neutral sodium resulting from the inversion of sodium columns towards about 1,700 target stars. Our maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, while gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas ratio at small distances.
  • We present new high resolution (R>50,000) absorption measurements of the NaI doublet (5889 - 5895A) along 482 nearby sight-lines, in addition to 807 new measurements of the CaII K (3933A) absorption line. We have combined these new data with previously reported measurements to produce a catalog of absorptions towards a total of 1857 early-type stars located within 800pc of the Sun. Using these data we have determined the approximate 3-dimensional spatial distribution of neutral and partly ionized interstellar gasdensity within a distance-cube of 300pc from the Sun. All newly recorded spectra were analyzed by means of a multi-component line profile-fitting program, in most cases using simultaneous fits to the line doublets. Normalized absorption profiles were fitted by varying the velocity, doppler width and column density for all intervening interstellar clouds. The resulting total column densities were then used in conjunction with the Hipparcos distances of the target stars to construct inversion maps of the 3-D spatial density distribution of the NaI and CaII bearing gas. A plot of the equivalent width of NaI versus distance reveals a wall of neutral gas at ~80pc that can be associated with the boundary wall to the central rarefied Local Cavity region. In contrast, a similar plot for the equivalent width of CaII shows no sharply increasing absorption at 80pc, but instead we observe a slowly increasing value of CaII equivalent width with increasing sight-line distance sampled.
  • The major sources of the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB), besides distinct structures as supernovae and superbubbles (e.g. Loop I), are: (i) an absorbed extragalactic emission following a power law, (ii) an absorbed thermal component ~2x10^6 K) from the galactic disk and halo, (iii) an unabsorbed thermal component, supposedly at 10^6 K, attributed to the Local Bubble and (iv) the very recently identified unabsorbed Solar Wind Charge-eXchange (SWCX) emission from the heliosphere and the geocorona. We study the SWCX heliospheric component and its contribution to observed data. In a first part, we apply a SWCX heliospheric simulation to model the oxygen lines (3/4 keV) local intensities during shadowing observations of the MBM12 molecular cloud and a dense filament in the south galactic hemisphere with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku telescopes. In a second part, we present a preliminary comparison of SWCX model results with ROSAT and Wisconsin surveys data in the 1/4 keV band. We conclude that, in the 3/4 keV band, the total local intensity is entirely heliospheric, while in the 1/4 keV band, the heliospheric component seems to contribute significantly to the local SXRB intensity and has potentially a strong influence on the interpretation of the ROSAT and Wisconsin surveys data in terms of Local Bubble hot gas temperature.
  • Interplanetary Lyman alpha line profiles are derived from the SWAN H cell data measurements. The measurements cover a 6-year period from solar minimum (1996) to after the solar maximum of 2001. This allows us to study the variations of the line profiles with solar activity. These line profiles were used to derive line shifts and line widths in the interplanetary medium for various angles of the LOS with the interstellar flow direction. The SWAN data results were then compared to an interplanetary background upwind spectrum obtained by STIS/HST in March 2001. We find that the LOS upwind velocity associated with the mean line shift of the IP \lya line varies from 25.7 km/s to 21.4 km/s from solar minimum to solar maximum. Most of this change is linked with variations in the radiation pressure. LOS kinetic temperatures derived from IP line widths do not vary monotonically with the upwind angle of the LOS. This is not compatible with calculations of IP line profiles based on hot model distributions of interplanetary hydrogen. We also find that the line profiles get narrower during solar maximum. The results obtained on the line widths (LOS temperature) show that the IP line is composed of two components scattered by two hydrogen populations with different bulk velocities and temperature. This is a clear signature of the heliospheric interface on the line profiles seen at 1 AU from the sun.