• Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves, spectacular horizontally propagating disturbances in the low solar corona, always trigger horizontal secondary waves (SWs) when they encounter ambient coronal structure. We present a first example of upward SWs in a streamer-like structure after the passing of an EUV wave. The event occurred on 2017 June 1. The EUV wave happened during a typical solar eruption including a filament eruption, a CME, a C6.6 flare. The EUV wave was associated with quasi-periodic fast propagating (QFP) wave trains and a type II radio burst that represented the existence of a coronal shock. The EUV wave had a fast initial velocity of $\sim$1000 km s$^{-1}$, comparable to high speeds of the shock and the QFP wave trains. Intriguingly, upward SWs rose slowly ($\sim$80 km s$^{-1}$) in the streamer-like structure after the sweeping of the EUV wave. The upward SWs seemed to originate from limb brightenings that were caused by the EUV wave. All the results show the EUV wave is a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic shock wave, likely triggered by the flare impulses. We suggest that part of the EUV wave was probably trapped in the closed magnetic fields of streamer-like structure, and upward SWs possibly resulted from the release of trapped waves in the form of slow-mode. It is believed that an interplay of the strong compression of the coronal shock and the configuration of the streamer-like structure is crucial for the formation of upward SWs.
  • The cold-dense plasma is occasionally detected in the solar wind with in situ data, but the source of the cold-dense plasma remains illusive. Interchange reconnections (IRs) between closed fields and nearby open fields are well known to contribute to the formation of solar winds. We present a confined filament eruption associated with a puff-like coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2014 December 24. The filament underwent successive activations and finally erupted, due to continuous magnetic flux cancellations and emergences. The confined erupting filament showed a clear untwist motion, and most of the filament material fell back. During the eruption, some tiny blobs escaped from the confined filament body, along newly-formed open field lines rooted around the south end of the filament, and some bright plasma flowed from the north end of the filament to remote sites at nearby open fields. The newly-formed open field lines shifted southward with multiple branches. The puff-like CME also showed multiple bright fronts and a clear southward shift. All the results indicate an intermittent IR existed between closed fields of the confined erupting filament and nearby open fields, which released a portion of filament material (blobs) to form the puff-like CME. We suggest that the IR provides a possible source of cold-dense plasma in the solar wind.
  • Using the high-quality observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the interaction of two filaments (F1 and F2) in a long filament channel associated with twin coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2016 January 26. Before the eruption, a sequence of rapid cancellation and emergence of the magnetic flux has been observed, which likely triggered the ascending of the west filament (F1). The east footpoints of rising F1 moved toward the east far end of the filament channel, accompanying with post-eruption loops and flare ribbons. It likely indicated a large-scale eruption involving the long filament channel, resulted from the interaction between F1 and the east filament (F2). Some bright plasma flew over F2, and F2 stayed at rest during the eruption, likely due to the confinement of its overlying lower magnetic field. Interestingly, the impulsive F1 pushed its overlying magnetic arcades to form the first CME, and F1 finally evolved into the second CME after the collision with the nearby coronal hole. We suggest that the interaction of F1 and the overlying magnetic field of F2 led to the merging reconnection that form a longer eruptive filament loop. Our results also provide a possible picture of the origin of twin CMEs, and show the large-scale magnetic topology of the coronal hole is important for the eventual propagation direction of CMEs.
  • With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.
  • Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using the high-quality imaging data of AIA/SDO, here we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which part of the jets, with the embedding coronal loops, runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced towards the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat-shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME initially with a narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph, propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 A dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region towards the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and the large- scale magnetic topology of the CH being important to define the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet-CME eruption.
  • We present simultaneous observations of three recurring jets in EUV and soft X-ray (SXR), which occurred in an active region on 2007 June 5. By comparing their morphological and kinematic characteristics in these two different wavelengths, we found that EUV and SXR jets had similar locations, directions, sizes and velocities. We also analyzed their spectral properties by using six spectral lines from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode, and found that these jets had temperatures from 0.05 to 2.0 MK and maximum electron densities from 6.6$\times10^{9}$ to 3.4$\times10^{10}$ cm$^{-3}$. For each jet, an elongated blue-shifted component and a red-shifted component at the jet base were simultaneously observed in Fe{\sc xii} $\lambda$195 and He{\sc ii} $\lambda$256 lines. The three jets had maximum Doppler velocities from 25 to 121 km s$^{-1}$ in Fe{\sc xii} $\lambda$195 line and from 115 to 232 km s $^{-1}$ in He{\sc ii} $\lambda$256 line. They had maximum non-thermal velocities from 98 to 181 km s$^{-1}$ in Fe{\sc xii} $\lambda$195 line and from 196 to 399 km s$^{-1}$ in He{\sc ii} $\lambda$256 line. We also examined the relationship between averaged Doppler velocities and maximum ionization temperatures of these three jets, and found that averaged Doppler velocities decreased with the increase of maximum ionization temperatures. In the photosphere, magnetic flux emergences and cancellations continuously took place at the jet base. These observational results were consistent with the magnetic reconnection jet model that magnetic reconnection between emerging magnetic flux and ambient magnetic field occurred in the lower atmosphere.