• In La Plante et al. (2017), we presented a new suite of hydrodynamic simulations with the aim of accurately capturing the process of helium II reionization. In this paper, we discuss the observational signatures present in the He II Ly$\alpha$ forest. We show that the effective optical depth of the volume $\tau_\mathrm{eff}$ is not sufficient for capturing the ionization state of helium II, due to the large variance inherent in sightlines. However, the He II flux PDF can be used to determine the timing of helium II reionization. The amplitude of the one-dimensional flux power spectrum can also determine the ionization state of helium II. We show that even given the currently limited number of observations ($\sim$50 sightlines), measurements of the flux PDF can yield information about helium II reionization. Further, measurements using the one-dimensional power spectrum can provide clear indications of the timing of reionization, as well as the relative bias of sources of ionizing radiation.
  • We have run a new suite of simulations that solve hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simultaneously to study helium II reionization. Our suite of simulations employs various models for populating quasars inside of dark matter halos, which affect the He II reionization history. In particular, we are able to explore the impact that differences in the timing and duration of reionization have on observables. We examine the thermal signature that reionization leaves on the IGM, and measure the temperature-density relation. As previous studies have shown, we confirm that the photoheating feedback from helium II reionization raises the temperature of the IGM by several thousand kelvin. To compare against observations, we generate synthetic Ly$\alpha$ forest sightlines on-the-fly and match the observed effective optical depth $\tau_{\mathrm{eff}}(z)$ of hydrogen to recent observations. We show that when the simulations have been normalized to have the same values of $\tau_\mathrm{eff}$, the effect that helium II reionization has on observations of the hydrogen Ly$\alpha$ forest is minimal. Specifically, the flux PDF and the one-dimensional power spectrum are sensitive to the thermal state of the IGM, but do not show direct evidence for the ionization state of helium. We show that the peak temperature of the IGM typically corresponds to the time of 90%-95% helium ionization by volume, and is a relatively robust indicator of the timing of reionization. Future observations of helium reionization from the hydrogen Ly$\alpha$ forest should thus focus on measuring the temperature of the IGM, especially at mean density. Detecting the peak in the IGM temperature would provide valuable information about the timing of the end of helium II reionization.
  • Motivated by recent observational constraints on dust reprocessed emission in star forming galaxies at $z\sim 6$ and above we use the very-large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation \bluetides\ to explore predictions for the amount of dust obscured star formation in the early Universe ($z>8$). \bluetides\ matches current observational constraints on both the UV luminosity function and galaxy stellar mass function and predicts that approximately $90\%$ of the star formation in high-mass ($M_{*}>10^{10}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$) galaxies at $z=8$ is already obscured by dust. The relationship between dust attenuation and stellar mass predicted by \bluetides\ is consistent with that observed at lower redshift. However, observations of several individual objects at $z>6$ are discrepant with the predictions, though it is possible their uncertainties may have been underestimated. We find that the predicted surface density of $z\ge 8$ sub-mm sources is below that accessible to current {\em Herschel}, SCUBA-2, and ALMA sub-mm surveys. However, as ALMA continues to accrue additional surface area the population of $z>8$ dust-obscured galaxies may become accessible in the near future.
  • Following the first two annual intensity mapping workshops at Stanford in March 2016 and Johns Hopkins in June 2017, we report on the recent advances in theory, instrumentation and observation that were presented in these meetings and some of the opportunities and challenges that were identified looking forward. With preliminary detections of CO, [CII], Lya and low-redshift 21cm, and a host of experiments set to go online in the next few years, the field is rapidly progressing on all fronts, with great anticipation for a flood of new exciting results. This current snapshot provides an efficient reference for experts in related fields and a useful resource for nonspecialists. We begin by introducing the concept of line-intensity mapping and then discuss the broad array of science goals that will be enabled, ranging from the history of star formation, reionization and galaxy evolution to measuring baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshift and constraining theories of dark matter, modified gravity and dark energy. After reviewing the first detections reported to date, we survey the experimental landscape, presenting the parameters and capabilities of relevant instruments such as COMAP, mmIMe, AIM-CO, CCAT-p, TIME, CONCERTO, CHIME, HIRAX, HERA, STARFIRE, MeerKAT/SKA and SPHEREx. Finally, we describe recent theoretical advances: different approaches to modeling line luminosity functions, several techniques to separate the desired signal from foregrounds, statistical methods to analyze the data, and frameworks to generate realistic intensity map simulations.
  • SDSS Collaboration: Franco D. Albareti, Carlos Allende Prieto, Andres Almeida, Friedrich Anders, Scott Anderson, Brett H. Andrews, Alfonso Aragon-Salamanca, Maria Argudo-Fernandez, Eric Armengaud, Eric Aubourg, Vladimir Avila-Reese, Carles Badenes, Stephen Bailey, Beatriz Barbuy, Kat Barger, Jorge Barrera-Ballesteros, Curtis Bartosz, Sarbani Basu, Dominic Bates, Giuseppina Battaglia, Falk Baumgarten, Julien Baur, Julian Bautista, Timothy C. Beers, Francesco Belfiore, Matthew Bershady, Sara Bertran de Lis, Jonathan C. Bird, Dmitry Bizyaev, Guillermo A. Blanc, Michael Blanton, Michael Blomqvist, Adam S. Bolton, J. Borissova, Jo Bovy, William Nielsen Brandt, Jonathan Brinkmann, Joel R. Brownstein, Kevin Bundy, Etienne Burtin, Nicolas G. Busca, Hugo Orlando Camacho Chavez, M. Cano Diaz, Michele Cappellari, Ricardo Carrera, Yanping Chen, Brian Cherinka, Edmond Cheung, Cristina Chiappini, Drew Chojnowski, Chia-Hsun Chuang, Haeun Chung, Rafael Fernando Cirolini, Nicolas Clerc, Roger E. Cohen, Julia M. Comerford, Johan Comparat, Marie-Claude Cousinou, Kevin Covey, Jeffrey D. Crane, Rupert Croft, Katia Cunha, Luiz da Costa, Gabriele da Silva Ilha, Jeremy Darling, James W. Davidson Jr., Kyle Dawson, Nathan De Lee, Axel de la Macorra, Sylvain de la Torre, Alice Deconto Machado, Timothee Delubac, Aleksandar M. Diamond-Stanic, John Donor, Juan Jose Downes, Niv Drory, Helion du Mas des Bourboux, Cheng Du, Tom Dwelly, Garrett Ebelke, Arthur Eigenbrot, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Yvonne P. Elsworth, Eric Emsellem, Michael Eracleous, Stephanie Escoffier, Michael L. Evans, Jesus Falcon-Barroso, Xiaohui Fan, Ginevra Favole, Emma Fernandez-Alvar, J. G. Fernandez-Trincado, Diane Feuillet, Scott W. Fleming, Andreu Font-Ribera, Gordon Freischlad, Peter Frinchaboy, Hai Fu, Yang Gao, D. A. Garcia-Hernandez, Ana E. Garcia Perez, Rafael A. Garcia, R. Garcia-Dias, Patrick Gaulme, Junqiang Ge, Douglas Geisler, Hector Gil Marin, Bruce Gillespie, Leo Girardi, Daniel Goddard, Yilen Gomez Maqueo Chew, Violeta Gonzalez-Perez, Kathleen Grabowski, Paul Green, Catherine J. Grier, Thomas Grier, Hong Guo, Julien Guy, Alex Hagen, Matt Hall, Paul Harding, R. E. Harley, Sten Hasselquist, Suzanne Hawley, Christian R. Hayes, Fred Hearty, Saskia Hekker, Hector Hernandez Toledo, Shirley Ho, David W. Hogg, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, Jon A. Holtzman, Parker H. Holzer, Jian Hu, Daniel Huber, Timothy Alan Hutchinson, Ho Seong Hwang, Hector J. Ibarra-Medel, Inese I. Ivans, KeShawn Ivory, Kurt Jaehnig, Trey W. Jensen, Jennifer A. Johnson, Amy Jones, Eric Jullo, T. Kallinger, Karen Kinemuchi, David Kirkby, Mark Klaene, Jean-Paul Kneib, Juna A. Kollmeier, Ivan Lacerna, Richard R. Lane, Dustin Lang, Pierre Laurent, David R. Law, Jean-Marc Le Goff, Alexie Leauthaud, Cheng Li, Ran Li, Chen Li, Niu Li, Fu-Heng Liang, Yu Liang, Marcos Lima, Lihwai Lin, Lin Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Dan Long, Sara Lucatello, Nicholas MacDonald, Chelsea L. MacLeod, J. Ted Mackereth, Suvrath Mahadevan, Marcio Antonio-Geimba Maia, Roberto Maiolino, Steven R. Majewski, Olena Malanushenko, Nicolas Dullius Mallmann, Arturo Manchado, Claudia Maraston, Rui Marques-Chaves, Inma Martinez Valpuesta, Karen L. Masters, Savita Mathur, Ian D. McGreer, Andrea Merloni, Michael R. Merrifield, Szabolcs Meszaros, Andres Meza, Andrea Miglio, Ivan Minchev, Karan Molaverdikhani, Antonio D. Montero-Dorta, Benoit Mosser, Demitri Muna, Adam Myers, Preethi Nair, Kirpal Nandra, Melissa Ness, Jeffrey A. Newman, Robert C. Nichol, David L. Nidever, Christian Nitschelm, Julia O'Connell, Audrey Oravetz, Nelson Padilla, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille, Kaike Pan, John Parejko, Isabelle Paris, John A. Peacock, Sebastien Peirani, Marcos Pellejero-Ibanez, Samantha Penny, Will J. Percival, Jeffrey W. Percival, Ismael Perez-Fournon, Patrick Petitjean, Matthew Pieri, Marc H. Pinsonneault, Alice Pisani, Francisco Prada, Abhishek Prakash, Natalie Price-Jones, M. Jordan Raddick, Mubdi Rahman, Anand Raichoor, Sandro Barboza Rembold, A. M. Reyna, James Rich, Hannah Richstein, Jethro Ridl, Rogerio Riffel, Rogemar A. Riffel, Hans-Walter Rix, Annie C. Robin, Constance M. Rockosi, Sergio Rodriguez-Torres, Thaise S. Rodrigues, Natalie Roe, A. Roman Lopes, Carlos Roman-Zuniga, Ashley J. Ross, Graziano Rossi, John Ruan, Rossana Ruggeri, Jessie C. Runnoe, Salvador Salazar-Albornoz, Mara Salvato, Ariel G. Sanchez, Sebastian F. Sanchez, Jose R. Sanchez-Gallego, Basilio Xavier Santiago, Ricardo Schiavon, Jaderson S. Schimoia, Eddie Schlafly, David J. Schlegel, Donald P. Schneider, Ralph Schoenrich, Mathias Schultheis, Axel Schwope, Hee-Jong Seo, Aldo Serenelli, Branimir Sesar, Zhengyi Shao, Matthew Shetrone, Michael Shull, Victor Silva Aguirre, M. F. Skrutskie, Anže Slosar, Michael Smith, Verne V. Smith, Jennifer Sobeck, Garrett Somers, Diogo Souto, David V. Stark, Keivan G. Stassun, Matthias Steinmetz, Dennis Stello, Thaisa Storchi Bergmann, Michael A. Strauss, Alina Streblyanska, Guy S. Stringfellow, Genaro Suarez, Jing Sun, Manuchehr Taghizadeh-Popp, Baitian Tang, Charling Tao, Jamie Tayar, Mita Tembe, Daniel Thomas, Jeremy Tinker, Rita Tojeiro, Christy Tremonti, Nicholas Troup, Jonathan R. Trump, Eduardo Unda-Sanzana, O. Valenzuela, Remco van den Bosch, Mariana Vargas-Magana, Jose Alberto Vazquez, Sandro Villanova, M. Vivek, Nicole Vogt, David Wake, Rene Walterbos, Yuting Wang, Enci Wang, Benjamin Alan Weaver, Anne-Marie Weijmans, David H. Weinberg, Kyle B. Westfall, David G. Whelan, Eric Wilcots, Vivienne Wild, Rob A. Williams, John Wilson, W. M. Wood-Vasey, Dominika Wylezalek, Ting Xiao, Renbin Yan, Meng Yang, Jason E. Ybarra, Christophe Yeche, Fang-Ting Yuan, Nadia Zakamska, Olga Zamora, Gail Zasowski, Kai Zhang, Cheng Zhao, Gong-Bo Zhao, Zheng Zheng, Zheng Zheng, Zhi-Min Zhou, Guangtun Zhu, Joel C. Zinn, Hu Zou
    Sept. 25, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in July 2014. It pursues three core programs: APOGEE-2, MaNGA, and eBOSS. In addition, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: TDSS and SPIDERS. This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13), which contains new data, reanalysis of existing data sets and, like all SDSS data releases, is inclusive of previously released data. DR13 makes publicly available 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA, the first data released from this survey. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing SEQUELS. In addition to targeting galaxies and quasars, SEQUELS also targeted variability-selected objects from TDSS and X-ray selected objects from SPIDERS. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification. DR13 releases new reductions of the APOGEE-1 data from SDSS-III, with abundances of elements not previously included and improved stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. For the SDSS imaging data, DR13 provides new, more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Several value-added catalogs are being released in tandem with DR13, in particular target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS, and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE. This paper describes the location and format of the data now publicly available, as well as providing references to the important technical papers that describe the targeting, observing, and data reduction. The SDSS website, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials and examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ~6-year operations of SDSS-IV.
  • Supermassive blackholes with masses of a billion solar masses or more are known to exist up to $z=7$. However, the present-day environments of the descendants of first quasars is not well understood and it is not known if they live in massive galaxy clusters or more isolated galaxies at $z=0$. We use a dark matter-only realization (BTMassTracer) of the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamic simulation to study the halo properties of the descendants of the most massive black holes at $z=8$. We find that the descendants of the quasars with most massive black holes are not amongst the most massive halos. They reside in halos of with group-like ($\sim 10^{14}M_{\odot}$) masses, while the most massive halos in the simulations are rich clusters with masses $\sim 10^{15} M_{\odot}$. The distribution of halo masses at low redshift is similar to that of the descendants of least massive black holes, for a similar range of halo masses at $z=8$, which indicates that they are likely to exist in similar environments. By tracing back to the $z = 8$ progenitors of the most massive (cluster sized) halos at $z=0$; we find that their most likely black hole mass is less than $10^7 M_{\odot}$; they are clearly not amongst the most massive black holes. We also provide estimates for the likelihood of finding a high redshift quasar hosting a black hole with masses above $10^{7} M_{\odot}$ for a given halo mass at $z=0$. For halos above $10^{15} M_{\odot}$, there is only $20 \%$ probability that their $z=8$ progenitors hosted a black hole with mass above $10^{7} M_{\odot}$.
  • We employ the very large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation BLUETIDES to investigate the predicted properties of the galaxy population during the epoch of reionisation ($z>8$). BLUETIDES has a resolution and volume ($(400/h\approx 577)^{3}\,{\rm cMpc^3}$) providing a population of galaxies which is well matched to depth and area of current observational surveys targeting the high-redshift Universe. At $z=8$ BLUETIDES includes almost 160,000 galaxies with stellar masses $>10^{8}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$. The population of galaxies predicted by BLUETIDES closely matches observational constraints on both the galaxy stellar mass function and far-UV ($150\,{\rm nm}$) luminosity function. Galaxies in BLUETIDES are characterised by rapidly increasing star formation histories. Specific star formation rates decrease with redshift though remain largely insensitive to stellar mass. As a result of the enhanced surface density of metals more massive galaxies are predicted to have higher dust attenuation resulting in a significant steepening of the observed far-UV luminosity function at high luminosities. The contribution of active SMBHs to the UV luminosities of galaxies with stellar masses $10^{9-10}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$ is around $3\%$ on average. Approximately $25\%$ of galaxies with $M_{*}\approx 10^{10}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}$ are predicted to have active SMBH which contribute $>10\%$ of the total UV luminosity.
  • We use the large cosmological hydro-dynamic simulation BlueTides to predict the photometric properties of galaxies during the epoch of reionisation ($z=8-15$). These properties include the rest-frame UV to near-IR broadband spectral energy distributions, the Lyman continuum photon production, the UV star formation rate calibration, and intrinsic UV continuum slope. In particular we focus on exploring the effect of various modelling assumptions, including the assumed choice of stellar population synthesis model, initial mass function, and the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons, upon these quantities. We find that these modelling assumptions can have a dramatic effect on photometric properties leading to consequences for the accurate determination of physical properties from observations. For example, at $z=8$ we predict that nebular emission can account for up-to $50\%$ of the rest-frame $R$-band luminosity, while the choice of stellar population synthesis model can change the Lyman continuum production rate up to a factor of $\times 2$.
  • The Lyman Continuum photon production efficiency ($\xi_{\rm ion}$) is a critical ingredient for inferring the number of photons available to reionise the intergalactic medium. To estimate the theoretical production efficiency in the high-redshift Universe we couple the BlueTides cosmological hydrodynamical simulation with a range of stellar population synthesis models. We find Lyman Continuum photon production efficiencies of $\log_{10}(\xi_{\rm ion}/{\rm erg^{-1}\, Hz})\approx 25.1-25.5$ depending on the choice of stellar population synthesis model. These results are broadly consistent with recent observational constraints at high-redshift though favour a model incorporating the effects of binary evolution
  • We examine the luminosity function (LF) of [OII] emission-line galaxies in the high-resolution cosmological simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII). From the spectral energy distribution of each galaxy, we select a sub-sample of star-forming galaxies at $0.06 \le z \le 3.0$ using the [OII] emission line luminosity L([OII]). We confirm that the specific star formation rate matches that in the GAMA survey. We show that the [OII] LF at z=1.0 from the MBII shows a good agreement with the LFs from several surveys below L([OII])=$10^{43.0}$ erg/s while the low redshifts ($z \le 0.3$) show an excess in the prediction of bright [OII] galaxies, but still displaying a good match with observations below L([OII])=$10^{41.6}$ erg/s. Based on the validity in reproducing the properties of [OII] galaxies at low redshift ($z \le 1$), we forecast the evolution of the [OII] LF at high redshift ($z \le 3$), which can be tested by upcoming surveys such as the HETDEX and DESI. The slopes of the LFs at bright and faint ends range from -3 to -2 showing minima at z=2. The slope of the bright end evolves approximately as 1/(z+1) at z=2 while the faint end evolves as ~3/(z+1) at $0.6 \le z \le 2$. In addition, a similar analysis is applied for the evolution of [OIII] LFs, which is to be explored in the forthcoming survey WFIRST-AFTA. Finally, we show that the auto-correlation function of [OII] and [OIII] emitting galaxies shows a rapid evolution from z=2 to 1.
  • In this paper, we study the filamentary structures and the galaxy alignment along filaments at redshift $z=0.06$ in the MassiveBlack-II simulation, a state-of-the-art, high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation which includes stellar and AGN feedback in a volume of (100 Mpc$/h$)$^3$. The filaments are constructed using the subspace constrained mean shift (SCMS; Ozertem & Erdogmus (2011) and Chen et al. (2015a)). First, we show that reconstructed filaments using galaxies and reconstructed filaments using dark matter particles are similar to each other; over $50\%$ of the points on the galaxy filaments have a corresponding point on the dark matter filaments within distance $0.13$ Mpc$/h$ (and vice versa) and this distance is even smaller at high-density regions. Second, we observe the alignment of the major principal axis of a galaxy with respect to the orientation of its nearest filament and detect a $2.5$ Mpc$/h$ critical radius for filament's influence on the alignment when the subhalo mass of this galaxy is between $10^9M_\odot/h$ and $10^{12}M_\odot/h$. Moreover, we find the alignment signal to increase significantly with the subhalo mass. Third, when a galaxy is close to filaments (less than $0.25$ Mpc$/h$), the galaxy alignment toward the nearest galaxy group depends on the galaxy subhalo mass. Finally, we find that galaxies close to filaments or groups tend to be rounder than those away from filaments or groups.
  • Whether among the myriad tiny proto-galaxies there exists a population with similarities to present day galaxies is an open question. We show, using BlueTides, the first hydrodynamic simulation large enough to resolve the relevant scales, that the first massive galaxies to form are %in fact predicted to have extensive rotationally-supported disks. Although their morphology resembles in some ways Milky-way types seen at much lower redshifts, these high-redshift galaxies are smaller, denser, and richer in gas than their low redshift counterparts. From a kinematic analysis of a statistical sample of 216 galaxies at redshift $z=8-10$ we have found that disk galaxies make up 70\% of the population of galaxies with stellar mass $10^{10} M_\odot$ or greater. Cold Dark Matter cosmology therefore makes specific predictions for the population of large galaxies 500 million years after the Big Bang. We argue that wide-field satellite telescopes (e.g. WFIRST) will in the near future discover these first massive disk galaxies. The simplicity of their structure and formation history should make possible new tests of cosmology.
  • The z > 2 Lyman-alpha (Lya) forest traces the underlying dark-matter distribution on large scales and, given sufficient sightlines, can be used to create 3D maps of large-scale structure. We examine the observational requirements to construct such maps and estimate the signal-to-noise as a function of exposure time and sightline density. Sightline densities at z = 2.25 are n_los = [360, 1200,3300] deg^{-2} at limiting magnitudes of g =[24.0, 24.5,25.0], resulting in transverse sightline separations of d_perp = [3.6, 1.9, 1.2] h^{-1} Mpc, which roughly sets the reconstruction scale. We simulate these reconstructions using mock spectra with realistic noise properties, and find that spectra with S/N = 4 per angstrom can be used to generate maps that clearly trace the underlying dark-matter at overdensities of rho/<rho> ~ 1. For the VLT/VIMOS spectrograph, exposure times t_exp = [4, 6, 10] hrs are sufficient for maps with spatial resolution epsilon_3d = [5.0, 3.2, 2.3] h^{-1} Mpc. Assuming ~ 250 h^{-1} Mpc is probed along the line-of-sight, 1 deg^2 of survey area would cover a comoving volume of ~ 10^6 h^{-3} Mpc^3 at <z>=2.3, enabling efficient mapping of large volumes with 8-10m telescopes. These maps could be used to study galaxy environments, detect proto-clusters, and study the topology of large-scale structure at high-z.
  • (Abridged for arXiv)We investigate the properties of halos, galaxies and blackholes to z=0 in the high resolution hydrodynamical simulation MassiveBlack-II (MBII) which evolves a LCDM cosmology in a comoving volume Vbox=100(Mpc/h)^3. MBII is the highest resolution simulation of this size which includes a self-consistent model for star formation, black hole accretion and associated feedback. We provide a simulation browser web application which enables interactive search and tagging of halos, subhalos and their properties and publicly release our galaxy catalogs. Our analysis of the halo mass function (MF) in MBII reveals that baryons have strong effects, with changes in the halo abundance of 20-35% below the knee of the MF (Mhalo < 10^13.2 Msun/h at z=0) when compared to fits based on dark matter only simulations. We provide a fitting function for the halo MF out to redshift z=11 and discuss how the onset of non-universality in the MF limits the accuracy of our fit. We study the halo occupation distribution and clustering of galaxies, in particular the evolution and scale dependence of stochasticity and bias finding reasonable agreement with observational data. The shape of the cosmic spectral energy distribution predicted by MBII is consistent with observations, but lower in amplitude. The Galaxy Stellar Mass Function (GSMF) function is broadly consistent with observations at z>=2. At z<2, the population of passive low mass (for M*<10^9 Msun) galaxies in MBII makes the GSMF too steep compared to observations whereas at the high mass end (M*>10^11 Msun) galaxies hosting bright AGNs make significant contributions to the GSMF. The quasar bolometric luminosity function is also largely consistent with observations. We note however that more efficient AGN feedback (beyond simple thermal coupling used here) is likely necessary for the largest, rarest objects/clusters at low redshifts.
  • We use zoom-in techniques to re-simulate three high-redshift (z > 5.5) halos which host 10^9 solar mass blackholes from the ~ Gpc volume, MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. We examine a number of factors potentially affecting supermassive blackhole growth at high redshift in cosmological simulations. These include numerical resolution, feedback prescriptions and formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. We find that varying the size of the region over which feedback energy is deposited directly, either for fixed number of neighbours or fixed volume makes very little difference to the accretion history of blackholes. Changing mass resolution by factors of up to 64 also does not change the blackhole growth history significantly. We find that switching from the density-entropy formulation to the pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics slightly increases the accretion rate onto blackholes. In general numerical details appear to have small effects on the main fueling mechanism for blackholes at these high redshifts. We examine the fashion by which this occurs, finding that the insensitivity to simulation technique seems to be a hallmark of the cold flow feeding picture of these high-z supermassive blackholes. We show that the gas that participates in critical accretion phases, in these massive objects at z > 6~7 is in all cases colder, denser, and forms more coherent streams than the average gas in the halo. This is also mostly the case when the blackhole accretion is feedback regulated (z < 6), however the distinction is less prominent. For our resimulated halos, cold flows appear to be a viable mechanism for forming the most massive blackholes in the early universe, occurring naturally in LambdaCDM models of structure formation. Not requiring fine tuning of numerical parameters, they seem to be physically inevitable in these objects.
  • By combining optical and near-IR observations from the Hubble Space Telescope with NIR photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope it is possible to measure the rest-frame UV-optical colours of galaxies at z=4-8. The UV-optical spectral energy distribution of star formation dominated galaxies is the result of several different factors. These include the joint distribution of stellar masses, ages, and metallicities, and the subsequent reprocessing by dust and gas in the ISM. Using a large cosmological hydrodynamical simulation we investigate the predicted spectral energy distributions of galaxies at high-redshift with a particular emphasis on assessing the potential contribution of nebular emission. We find that the average pure stellar UV-optical colour correlates with both luminosity and redshift such that galaxies at lower-redshift and higher-luminosity are typically redder. Assuming the escape fraction of ionising photons is close to zero, the effect of nebular emission is to redden the UV-optical 1500-V_w colour by, on average, 0.4 mag at z=8 declining to 0.25 mag at z=4. Young and low-metallicity stellar populations, which typically have bluer pure stellar UV-optical colours, produce larger ionising luminosities and are thus more strongly affected by the reddening effects of nebular emission. This causes the distribution of 1500-V_w colours to narrow and the trends with luminosity and redshift to weaken. The strong effect of nebular emission leaves observed-frame colours critically sensitive to the source redshift. For example, increasing the redshift by 0.1 can result in observed frame colours changing by up to ~0.6. These predictions reinforce the need to include nebular emission when modelling the spectral energy distributions of galaxies at high-redshift and also highlight the difficultly in interpreting the observed colours of individual galaxies without precise redshifts.
  • The observed UV continuum slope of star forming galaxies is strongly affected by the presence of dust. Its observation is then a potentially valuable diagnostic of dust attenuation, particularly at high-redshift where other diagnostics are currently inaccesible. Interpreting the observed UV continuum slope in the context of dust attenuation is often achieved assuming the empirically calibrated Meurer et al. (1999) relation. Implicit in this relation is the assumption of an intrinsic UV continuum slope ($\beta=-2.23$). However, results from numerical simulations suggest that the intrinsic UV continuum slopes of high-redshift star forming galaxies are bluer than this, and moreover vary with redshift. Using values of the intrinsic slope predicted by numerical models of galaxy formation combined with a Calzetti et al. (2000) reddening law we infer UV attenuations ($A_{1500}$) $0.35-0.5\,{\rm mag}$ ($A_{V}$: $0.14-0.2\,{\rm mag}$ assuming Calzetti et al. 2000) greater than simply assuming the Meurer relation. This has significant implications for the inferred amount of dust attenuation at very-high ($z\approx 7$) redshift given current observational constraints on $\beta$, combined with the Meurer relation, suggest dust attenuation to be virtually zero in all but the most luminous systems.
  • We investigate the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function at high-redshift ($z\ge 5$) using a pair of large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations: {\em MassiveBlack} and {\em MassiveBlack-II}. By combining these simulations we can study the properties of galaxies with stellar masses greater than $10^{8}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}\,h^{-1}$ and (co-moving) number densities of $\log_{10}(\phi\, [{\rm Mpc^{-3}\,dex^{-1}}\,h^{3}])>-8$. Observational determinations of the galaxy stellar mass function at very-high redshift typically assume a relation between the observed UV luminosity and stellar mass-to-light ratio which is applied to high-redshift samples in order to estimate stellar masses. This relation can also be measured from the simulations. We do this, finding two significant differences with the usual observational assumption: it evolves strongly with redshift and has a different shape. Using this relation to make a consistent comparison between galaxy stellar mass functions we find that at $z=6$ and above the simulation predictions are in good agreement with observed data over the whole mass range. Without using the correct UV luminosity and stellar mass-to-light ratio, the discrepancy would be up to two orders of magnitude for large galaxies $>10^{10}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}\,h^{-1}$. At $z=5$, however the stellar mass function for low mass $<10^{9}\,{\rm M_{\odot}}\,h^{-1}$ galaxies is overpredicted by factors of a few, consistent with the behaviour of the UV luminosity function, and perhaps a sign that feedback in the simulation is not efficient enough for these galaxies.
  • Using a new large-scale (~ 0.75 Gpc)^3 hydrodynamic cosmological simulation we investigate the growth rate of supermassive black holes in the early universe (z > 4.75). Remarkably, we find a clear peak in the typical Eddington ratio at black hole masses of 4-8 * 10^7 solar masses (typically found in halos of ~7 * 10^11 to 10^12 solar masses), independent of redshift and indicative that most of BH growth occurs in the cold-flow dominated regime. Black hole growth is by and large regulated by the evolution of gas density. The typical Eddington ratio at a given mass scales simply as cosmological density (1+z)^3 and the peak is caused by the competition between increased gas density available in more massive hosts, and a decrease due to strong AGN feedback that deprives the black hole of sufficient gas to fuel further rapid growth in the high mass end. In addition to evolution in the mean Eddington ratio, we show that the distribution of Eddington ratio among both mass-selected and luminosity-selected samples is approximately log-normal. We combine these findings into a single log-normal fitting formula for the distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of (M_BH,z). This formula can be used in analytic and semi analytic models for evolving black hole populations, predicting black hole masses of observed quasars, and, in conjunction with the observed distribution of Eddington ratios, can be used to constrain the black hole mass function.
  • We use a large dark matter simulation of a LambdaCDM model to investigate the clustering and environmental dependence of the number of substructures in a halo. Focusing on redshift z=1, we find that the halo occupation distribution is sensitive at the tens of percent level to the surrounding density and to a lesser extent to asymmetry of the surrounding density distribution. We compute the autocorrelation function of halos as a function of occupation, building on the finding of Wechsler et al. (2006) and Gao and White (2007) that halos (at fixed mass) with more substructure are more clustered. We compute the relative bias as a function of occupation number at fixed mass, finding a strong relationship. At fixed mass, halos in the top 5% of occupation can have an autocorrelation function ~ 1.5-2 times higher than the mean. We also compute the bias as a function of halo mass, for fixed halo occupation. We find that for group and cluster sized halos, when the number of subhalos is held fixed, there is a strong anticorrelation between bias and halo mass. Such a relationship represents an additional challenge to the halo model.
  • Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z>2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-alpha forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = exp(-tau)) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 Mpc/h, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-alpha forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard LCDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16<b<0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44<beta<1.20, at central redshift z=2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+\beta)=0.336 +/- 0.012. The errors on beta are asymmetric, with beta=0 excluded at over 5 sigma confidence level. The value of beta is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-alpha forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-alpha forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.
  • Observations of the most distant bright quasars imply that billion solar mass supermassive black holes (SMBH) have to be assembled within the first eight hundred million years. Under our standard galaxy formation scenario such fast growth implies large gas densities providing sustained accretion at critical or supercritical rates onto an initial black hole seed. It has been a long standing question whether and how such high black hole accretion rates can be achieved and sustained at the centers of early galaxies. Here we use our new cosmological hydrodynamic simulation (MassiveBlack) covering a volume (0.75 \Gpc)^3 appropriate for studying the rare first quasars to show that steady high density cold gas flows responsible for assembling the first galaxies produce the high gas densities that lead to sustained critical accretion rates and hence rapid growth commensurate with the existence of ~10^9 solar mass black holes as early as z~7. We find that under these conditions quasar feedback is not effective at stopping the cold gas from penetrating the central regions and hence cannot quench the accretion until the host galaxy reaches M_halo > 10^{12} solar masses. This cold-flow driven scenario for the formation of quasars implies that they should be ubiquitous in galaxies in the early universe and that major (proto)galaxy mergers are not a requirement for efficient fuel supply and growth, particularly for the earliest SMBHs.
  • We examine predictions for the quasar luminosity functions (QLF) and quasar clustering at high redshift (z > 4.75) using MassiveBlack, our new hydrodynamic cosmological simulation which includes a self-consistent model for black hole growth and feedback. We show that the model reproduces the Sloan QLF within observational constraints at z >= 5. We find that the high-z QLF is consistent with a redshift-independent occupation distribution of BHs among dark matter halos (which we provide) such that the evolution of the QLF follows that of the halo mass function. The sole exception is the bright-end at z=6 and 7, where BHs in high-mass halos tend to be unusually bright due to extended periods of Eddington growth caused by high density cold flows into the halo center. We further use these luminosity functions to make predictions for the number density of quasars in upcoming surveys, predicting there should be ~119+-28 (~87+-28) quasars detectable in the F125W band of the WIDE (DEEP) fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) from z=5-6, ~19+-7 (~18+-9) from z=6-7, and ~1.7+-1.5 (~1.5+-1.5) from z=7-8. We also investigate quasar clustering, finding that the correlation length is fully consistent with current constraints for Sloan quasars (r_0~17 h^{-1} Mpc at z=4 for quasars above m_i = 20.2), and grows slowly with redshift up to z=6 (r_0~22 h^{-1} Mpc). Finally, we note that the quasar clustering strength depends weakly on luminosity for low L_BH, but gets stronger at higher L_BH as the BHs are found in higher mass halos.
  • (abridged) We estimate the cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function (Xi_cg), from the APM galaxy and galaxy cluster surveys, both in real space from the inversion of projected statistics and in redshift space using the galaxy and cluster redshift samples. The amplitude of Xi_cg is found to be almost independent of cluster richness. At large separations, r >~5 h^-1 Mpc, Xi_cg has a similar shape to the galaxy-galaxy and cluster-cluster autocorrelation functions. Xi_cg in redshift space can be related to the real space Xi_cg by convolution with an appropriate velocity field model. Here we apply a spherical collapse model, which we have tested against N-body simulations, finding that it provides a surprisingly accurate description of the averaged infall velocity of matter into galaxy clusters. We use this model to estimate beta (Omega^{0.6}/b) and find that it tends to overestimate the true result in simulations by only ~10-30%. Application to the APM results yields beta=0.43 with beta < 0.87 at 95% confidence. We also compare the APM Xi_cg and galaxy autocorrelations to results from popular cosmological models and derive two independent estimates of the galaxy biasing expected as a function of scale. Both low and critical density CDM models require anti-biasing by a factor ~2 on scales r <~ 2 h^-1Mpc and an MDM model is consistent with a constant biasing factor on all scales. We use the velocity fields predicted from the different models to distort the APM real space cross-correlation function. Comparison with the APM redshift space Xi_cg yields an estimate of the value of Omega^0.6 needed in each model. Only the low Omega model is fully consistent with observations, with MDM marginally excluded at the ~2 sigma level.
  • A convincing physical picture for the Lyman-alpha forest has emerged from simulations and related semi-analytic studies of structure formation models. Observations can be be used in the context of this picture to study cosmology using the structure of the forest. With the availability of well motivated predictions, not only has it become possible to test models directly, but the physical processes involved appear to be simple enough that we can attempt to reconstruct aspects of the underlying cosmology from observations. We briefly summarise the method of Croft et al (1997) (astro-ph/9708018) for recovering the primordial mass power spectrum from Lyman-alpha forest data, emphasising the physical reasons that the derived P(k) is independent of unknown "bias factors". We present an illustrative application of the method to four quasar "spectra" reconstructed from published line lists.