• We discuss the ground-breaking science that will be possible with a wide area survey, using the MeerKAT telescope, known as MeerKLASS (MeerKAT Large Area Synoptic Survey). The current specifications of MeerKAT make it a great fit for science applications that require large survey speeds but not necessarily high angular resolutions. In particular, for cosmology, a large survey over $\sim 4,000 \, {\rm deg}^2$ for $\sim 4,000$ hours will potentially provide the first ever measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillations using the 21cm intensity mapping technique, with enough accuracy to impose constraints on the nature of dark energy. The combination with multi-wavelength data will give unique additional information, such as exquisite constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity using the multi-tracer technique, as well as a better handle on foregrounds and systematics. Such a wide survey with MeerKAT is also a great match for HI galaxy studies, providing unrivalled statistics in the pre-SKA era for galaxies resolved in the HI emission line beyond local structures at z > 0.01. It will also produce a large continuum galaxy sample down to a depth of about 5\,$\mu$Jy in L-band, which is quite unique over such large areas and will allow studies of the large-scale structure of the Universe out to high redshifts, complementing the galaxy HI survey to form a transformational multi-wavelength approach to study galaxy dynamics and evolution. Finally, the same survey will supply unique information for a range of other science applications, including a large statistical investigation of galaxy clusters as well as produce a rotation measure map across a huge swathe of the sky. The MeerKLASS survey will be a crucial step on the road to using SKA1-MID for cosmological applications and other commensal surveys, as described in the top priority SKA key science projects (abridged).
  • The interstellar medium is a complex 'ecosystem' with gas constituents in the atomic, molecular, and ionized states, dust, magnetic fields, and relativistic particles. The Canadian Galactic Plane Survey has imaged these constituents with angular resolution of the order of arcminutes. This paper presents radio continuum data at 408 MHz over the area 52 degrees < longitude < 193 degrees, -6.5 degrees < latitude < 8.5 degrees, with an extension to latitude = 21 degrees in the range 97 degrees < longitude < 120 degrees, with angular resolution 2.8' x 2.8' cosec(declination). Observations were made with the Synthesis Telescope at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey. The calibration of the survey using existing radio source catalogs is described. The accuracy of 408-MHz flux densities from the data is 6%. Information on large structures has been incorporated into the data using the single-antenna survey of Haslam (1982). The paper presents the data, describes how it can be accessed electronically, and gives examples of applications of the data to ISM research.
  • Gamma-ray emitting blazars have been the targets of many recent or ongoing monitoring programmes. The resulting multi-wavelength data archives are ideal for studying the quiescent and variable behaviour of the blazar PKS 2155-304. Here, observations of the optical polarization of the source between 2009 and 2014 (> 5 years) are presented, together with overlapping radio, photometric and gamma-ray measurements. During this time the source displayed significant variability at all wavelengths, with several prominent flares seen for the optical and gamma-ray intensity. These flares are typically associated with large rotations (>80{\deg}) in the polarization angle, during which the polarization angle appears to be oriented parallel to the position angle of the spatially resolved radio jet. Our aim is to determine if these large polarization angle rotations are correlated to the multi-wavelength outbursts seen in PKS 2155-304 in order to examine how changes in the polarization angle (and its orientation relative to the jet) relate to changes in the spectral energy distribution of the source.
  • Magnetic fields play an important role in shaping the structure and evolution of the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies, but the details of this relationship remain unclear. With SKA1, the 3D structure of galactic magnetic fields and its connection to star formation will be revealed. A highly sensitive probe of the internal structure of the magnetoionized ISM is the partial depolarization of synchrotron radiation from inside the volume. Different configurations of magnetic field and ionized gas within the resolution element of the telescope lead to frequency-dependent changes in the observed degree of polarization. The results of spectro-polarimetric observations are tied to physical structure in the ISM through comparison with detailed modeling, supplemented with the use of new analysis techniques that are being actively developed and studied within the community such as Rotation Measure Synthesis. The SKA will enable this field to come into its own and begin the study of the detailed structure of the magnetized ISM in a sample of nearby galaxies, thanks to its extraordinary wideband capabilities coupled with the combination of excellent surface brightness sensitivity and angular resolution.
  • Magnetic fields in the Milky Way are present on a wide variety of sizes and strengths, influencing many processes in the Galactic ecosystem such as star formation, gas dynamics, jets, and evolution of supernova remnants or pulsar wind nebulae. Observation methods are complex and indirect; the most used of these are a grid of rotation measures of unresolved polarized extragalactic sources, and broadband polarimetry of diffuse emission. Current studies of magnetic fields in the Milky Way reveal a global spiral magnetic field with a significant turbulent component; the limited sample of magnetic field measurements in discrete objects such as supernova remnants and HII regions shows a wide variety in field configurations; a few detections of magnetic fields in Young Stellar Object jets have been published; and the magnetic field structure in the Galactic Center is still under debate. The SKA will unravel the 3D structure and configurations of magnetic fields in the Milky Way on sub-parsec to galaxy scales, including field structure in the Galactic Center. The global configuration of the Milky Way disk magnetic field, probed through pulsar RMs, will resolve controversy about reversals in the Galactic plane. Characteristics of interstellar turbulence can be determined from the grid of background RMs. We expect to learn to understand magnetic field structures in protostellar jets, supernova remnants, and other discrete sources, due to the vast increase in sample sizes possible with the SKA. This knowledge of magnetic fields in the Milky Way will not only be crucial in understanding of the evolution and interaction of Galactic structures, but will also help to define and remove Galactic foregrounds for a multitude of extragalactic and cosmological studies.
  • Astronomy at or below the 'survey threshold' has expanded significantly since the publication of the original 'Science with the Square Kilometer Array' in 1999 and its update in 2004. The techniques in this regime may be broadly (but far from exclusively) defined as 'confusion' or 'P(D)' analyses (analyses of one-point statistics), and 'stacking', accounting for the flux-density distribution of noise-limited images co-added at the positions of objects detected/isolated in a different waveband. Here we discuss the relevant issues, present some examples of recent analyses, and consider some of the consequences for the design and use of surveys with the SKA and its pathfinders.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • Synthesis imaging in radio astronomy is affected by instrumental and atmospheric effects which introduce direction-dependent (DD) gains.The antenna power pattern varies both as a function of time and frequency. The broad band time varying nature of the antenna power pattern when not corrected leads to gross errors in full Stokes imaging and flux estimation. In this poster we explore the errors that arise in image deconvolution while not accounting for the time and frequency dependence of the antenna power pattern. Simulations were conducted with the wide-band full Stokes power pattern of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) antennas to demonstrate the level of errors arising from direction-dependent gains and their non-neglegible impact on upcoming sky surveys such as the VLASS. DD corrections through hybrid projection algorithms are computationally expensive to perform. A highly parallel implementation through high performance computing architectures is the only feasible way of applying these corrections to the large data sizes of these upcoming surveys.
  • (Abridged)One of the fundamental challenges for astrophysics in the 21st century is finding a way to untangle the physical processes that govern galaxy formation and evolution. Given the importance and scope of this problem, the multi-wavelength astronomical community has used the past decade to build up a wealth of information over specific extragalactic deep fields to address key questions in galaxy formation and evolution. These fields generally cover at least 10square degrees to facilitate the investigation of the rarest, typically most massive, galaxies and AGN. Furthermore, such areal coverage allows the environments to be fully accounted for, thereby linking the single halo to the two-halo terms in the halo occupation distribution. Surveys at radio wavelengths have begun to lag behind those at other wavelengths, especially in this medium-deep survey tier. However, the survey speed offered by the JVLA means that we can now reach a point where we can begin to obtain commensurate data at radio wavelengths to those which already exists from the X-ray through to the far-infrared over ~10 square degrees. We therefore present the case for a 10 square degree survey to 1.5uJy at L-band in A or B Array, requiring ~4000 hours to provide census of star-formation and AGN-accretion activity in the Universe. For example, the observations will allow galaxies forming stars at 10Msolar/yr to be detected out to z~1 and luminous infrared galaxies (1000Msolar/yr to be found out to z~6. Furthermore, the survey area ensures that we will have enough cosmic volume to find these rare sources at all epochs. The bandwidth will allow us to determine the polarisation properties galaxies in the high-redshift Universe as a function of stellar mass, morphology and redshift.
  • We have determined 194 Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of polarized extragalactic radio sources using new, multi-channel polarization observations at frequencies around 1.4 GHz from the Very Large Array (VLA) in the Galactic plane at $17^\circ \leq l \leq 63^\circ$ and $205^\circ \leq l \leq 253^\circ$. This catalog fills in gaps in the RM coverage of the Galactic plane between the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey and Southern Galactic Plane Survey. Using this catalog we have tested the validity of recently-proposed axisymmetric and bisymmetric models of the large-scale (or regular) Galactic magnetic field, and found that of the existing models we tested, an axisymmetric spiral model with reversals occurring in rings (as opposed to along spiral arms) best matched our observations. Building on this, we have performed our own modeling, using RMs from both extragalactic sources and pulsars. By developing independent models for the magnetic field in the outer and inner Galaxy, we conclude that in the inner Galaxy, the magnetic field closely follows the spiral arms, while in the outer Galaxy, the field is consistent with being purely azimuthal.Furthermore, the models contain no reversals in the outer Galaxy, and together seem to suggest the existence of a single reversed region that spirals out from the Galactic center.
  • The GALFACTS project is using the L-band seven feed array receiver system on the Arecibo telescope to carry out an imaging spectro-polarimetric survey of the 30% of the sky visible from Arecibo. GALFACTS observations will create full-Stokes image cubes at an angular resolution of 3.5', with several thousand spectral channels covering 1225 - 1525 MHz, and band-averaged sensitivity of 90 uJy, allowing sensitive imaging of polarized radiation and Faraday Rotation Measure from both diffuse emission and against a high density grid of extragalactic sources. GALFACTS will be a major observational advance in imaging of the polarized radiation from the Milky Way and will provide a rich new database for exploration of the magnetic field of the Galaxy and the properties of the magneto-ionic medium.
  • We present results of deep polarization imaging at 1.4 GHz with the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory as part of the DRAO Planck Deep Fields project. This deep extragalactic field covers 15.16 square degrees centered at RA = 16h 14m and DEC = 54d 56', has an angular resolution of 42" x 62" at the field center, and reaches a sensitivity of 55 microJy/beam in Stokes I and 45 microJy/beam in Stokes Q and U. We detect 958 radio sources in Stokes I of which 136 are detected in polarization. We present the Euclidean-normalized polarized differential source counts down to 400 microJy. These counts indicate that sources have a higher degree of fractional polarization at fainter Stokes I flux density levels than for brighter sources, confirming an earlier result. We find that the majority of our polarized sources are steep-spectrum objects with a mean spectral index of -0.77, and there is no correlation between fractional polarization and spectral index. We also matched deep field sources to counterparts in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters catalogue. Of the polarized sources, 77% show structure at the arc-second scale whereas only 38% of the sources with no detectable polarization show such structure. The median fractional polarization is for resolved sources is 6.8%, while it is 4.4% for compact objects. The polarized radio sources in our deep field are predominantly those sources which are resolved and show the highest degrees of fractional polarization, indicating that the lobe dominated structure may be the source of the highly polarized sources. These resolved radio galaxies dominate the polarized source counts at P_0 = sqrt(Q^2 + U^2) < 3 mJy.