• LSST Science Collaborations: Phil Marshall, Timo Anguita, Federica B. Bianco, Eric C. Bellm, Niel Brandt, Will Clarkson, Andy Connolly, Eric Gawiser, Zeljko Ivezic, Lynne Jones, Michelle Lochner, Michael B. Lund, Ashish Mahabal, David Nidever, Knut Olsen, Stephen Ridgway, Jason Rhodes, Ohad Shemmer, David Trilling, Kathy Vivas, Lucianne Walkowicz, Beth Willman, Peter Yoachim, Scott Anderson, Pierre Antilogus, Ruth Angus, Iair Arcavi, Humna Awan, Rahul Biswas, Keaton J. Bell, David Bennett, Chris Britt, Derek Buzasi, Dana I. Casetti-Dinescu, Laura Chomiuk, Chuck Claver, Kem Cook, James Davenport, Victor Debattista, Seth Digel, Zoheyr Doctor, R. E. Firth, Ryan Foley, Wen-fai Fong, Lluis Galbany, Mark Giampapa, John E. Gizis, Melissa L. Graham, Carl Grillmair, Phillipe Gris, Zoltan Haiman, Patrick Hartigan, Suzanne Hawley, Renee Hlozek, Saurabh W. Jha, C. Johns-Krull, Shashi Kanbur, Vassiliki Kalogera, Vinay Kashyap, Vishal Kasliwal, Richard Kessler, Alex Kim, Peter Kurczynski, Ofer Lahav, Michael C. Liu, Alex Malz, Raffaella Margutti, Tom Matheson, Jason D. McEwen, Peregrine McGehee, Soren Meibom, Josh Meyers, Dave Monet, Eric Neilsen, Jeffrey Newman, Matt O'Dowd, Hiranya V. Peiris, Matthew T. Penny, Christina Peters, Radoslaw Poleski, Kara Ponder, Gordon Richards, Jeonghee Rho, David Rubin, Samuel Schmidt, Robert L. Schuhmann, Avi Shporer, Colin Slater, Nathan Smith, Marcelles Soares-Santos, Keivan Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael Strauss, Rachel Street, Christopher Stubbs, Mark Sullivan, Paula Szkody, Virginia Trimble, Tony Tyson, Miguel de Val-Borro, Stefano Valenti, Robert Wagoner, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Bevin Ashley Zauderer
    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is designed to provide an unprecedented optical imaging dataset that will support investigations of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe, across half the sky and over ten years of repeated observation. However, exactly how the LSST observations will be taken (the observing strategy or "cadence") is not yet finalized. In this dynamically-evolving community white paper, we explore how the detailed performance of the anticipated science investigations is expected to depend on small changes to the LSST observing strategy. Using realistic simulations of the LSST schedule and observation properties, we design and compute diagnostic metrics and Figures of Merit that provide quantitative evaluations of different observing strategies, analyzing their impact on a wide range of proposed science projects. This is work in progress: we are using this white paper to communicate to each other the relative merits of the observing strategy choices that could be made, in an effort to maximize the scientific value of the survey. The investigation of some science cases leads to suggestions for new strategies that could be simulated and potentially adopted. Notably, we find motivation for exploring departures from a spatially uniform annual tiling of the sky: focusing instead on different parts of the survey area in different years in a "rolling cadence" is likely to have significant benefits for a number of time domain and moving object astronomy projects. The communal assembly of a suite of quantified and homogeneously coded metrics is the vital first step towards an automated, systematic, science-based assessment of any given cadence simulation, that will enable the scheduling of the LSST to be as well-informed as possible.
  • The growing field of large-scale time domain astronomy requires methods for probabilistic data analysis that are computationally tractable, even with large datasets. Gaussian Processes are a popular class of models used for this purpose but, since the computational cost scales, in general, as the cube of the number of data points, their application has been limited to small datasets. In this paper, we present a novel method for Gaussian Process modeling in one-dimension where the computational requirements scale linearly with the size of the dataset. We demonstrate the method by applying it to simulated and real astronomical time series datasets. These demonstrations are examples of probabilistic inference of stellar rotation periods, asteroseismic oscillation spectra, and transiting planet parameters. The method exploits structure in the problem when the covariance function is expressed as a mixture of complex exponentials, without requiring evenly spaced observations or uniform noise. This form of covariance arises naturally when the process is a mixture of stochastically-driven damped harmonic oscillators -- providing a physical motivation for and interpretation of this choice -- but we also demonstrate that it can be a useful effective model in some other cases. We present a mathematical description of the method and compare it to existing scalable Gaussian Process methods. The method is fast and interpretable, with a range of potential applications within astronomical data analysis and beyond. We provide well-tested and documented open-source implementations of this method in C++, Python, and Julia.
  • Variability in the light curves of spotted, rotating stars is often non-sinusoidal and quasi-periodic --- spots move on the stellar surface and have finite lifetimes, causing stellar flux variations to slowly shift in phase. A strictly periodic sinusoid therefore cannot accurately model a rotationally modulated stellar light curve. Physical models of stellar surfaces have many drawbacks preventing effective inference, such as highly degenerate or high-dimensional parameter spaces. In this work, we test an appropriate effective model: a Gaussian Process with a quasi-periodic covariance kernel function. This highly flexible model allows sampling of the posterior probability density function of the periodic parameter, marginalising over the other kernel hyperparameters using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. To test the effectiveness of this method, we infer rotation periods from 333 simulated stellar light curves, demonstrating that the Gaussian process method produces periods that are more accurate than both a sine-fitting periodogram and an autocorrelation function method. We also demonstrate that it works well on real data, by inferring rotation periods for 275 Kepler stars with previously measured periods. We provide a table of rotation periods for these 1132 Kepler objects of interest and their posterior probability density function samples. Because this method delivers posterior probability density functions, it will enable hierarchical studies involving stellar rotation, particularly those involving population modelling, such as inferring stellar ages, obliquities in exoplanet systems, or characterising star-planet interactions. The code used to implement this method is available online.
  • The relations between observable stellar parameters are usually assumed to be deterministic. That is, given an infinitely precise measurement of independent variable, `$x$', and some model, the value of dependent variable, `$y$' can be known exactly. In practise this assumption is rarely valid and intrinsic stochasticity means that two stars with exactly the same `$x$', will have slightly different `$y$'s. The relation between short-timescale brightness fluctuations (flicker) of stars and both surface gravity and stellar density are two such stochastic relations that have, until now, been treated as deterministic ones. We recalibrate these relations in a probabilistic framework, using Hierarchical Bayesian Modelling (HBM) to constrain the intrinsic scatter in the relations. We find evidence for additional scatter in the relationships, that cannot be accounted for by the observational uncertainties alone. The scatter in surface gravity and stellar density does not depend on flicker, suggesting that using flicker as a proxy for $\log g$ and $\rho_\star$ is equally valid for dwarf and giant stars, despite the fact that the observational uncertainties tend to be larger for dwarfs.
  • This is the stars chapter of the Kavli workshop report, which resulted from the community-based study of needed US OIR capabilities in the LSST era. The full report, which will include this chapter, is anticipated to be available in Fall 2016. See NOAO website (http://www.noao.edu/meetings/lsst-oir-study/) for more details.
  • White dwarfs are the end state of most stars, including the Sun, after they exhaust their nuclear fuel. Between 1/4 and 1/2 of white dwarfs have elements heavier than helium in their atmospheres, even though these elements should rapidly settle into the stellar interiors unless they are occasionally replenished. The abundance ratios of heavy elements in white dwarf atmospheres are similar to rocky bodies in the Solar system. This and the existence of warm dusty debris disks around about 4% of white dwarfs suggest that rocky debris from white dwarf progenitors' planetary systems occasionally pollute the stars' atmospheres. The total accreted mass can be comparable to that of large asteroids in the solar system. However, the process of disrupting planetary material has not yet been observed. Here, we report observations of a white dwarf being transited by at least one and likely multiple disintegrating planetesimals with periods ranging from 4.5 hours to 4.9 hours. The strongest transit signals occur every 4.5 hours and exhibit varying depths up to 40% and asymmetric profiles, indicative of a small object with a cometary tail of dusty effluent material. The star hosts a dusty debris disk and the star's spectrum shows prominent lines from heavy elements like magnesium, aluminium, silicon, calcium, iron, and nickel. This system provides evidence that heavy element pollution of white dwarfs can originate from disrupted rocky bodies such as asteroids and minor planets.
  • From pulsating stars to transiting exoplanets, the search for periodic signals in K2 data, Kepler's 2-wheeled extension, is relevant to a long list of scientific goals. Systematics affecting K2 light curves due to the decreased spacecraft pointing precision inhibit the easy extraction of periodic signals from the data. We here develop a method for producing periodograms of K2 light curves that are insensitive to pointing-induced systematics; the Systematics-Insensitive Periodogram (SIP). Traditional sine-fitting periodograms use a generative model to find the frequency of a sinusoid that best describes the data. We extend this principle by including systematic trends, based on a set of 'Eigen light curves', following Foreman-Mackey et al. (2015), in our generative model as well as a sum of sine and cosine functions over a grid of frequencies. Using this method we are able to produce periodograms with vastly reduced systematic features. The quality of the resulting periodograms are such that we can recover acoustic oscillations in giant stars and measure stellar rotation periods without the need for any detrending. The algorithm is also applicable to the detection of other periodic phenomena such as variable stars, eclipsing binaries and short-period exoplanet candidates. The SIP code is available at https://github.com/RuthAngus/SIPK2.
  • Among the available methods for dating stars, gyrochronology is a powerful one because it requires knowledge of only the star's mass and rotation period. Gyrochronology relations have previously been calibrated using young clusters, with the Sun providing the only age dependence, and are therefore poorly calibrated at late ages. We used rotation period measurements of 310 Kepler stars with asteroseismic ages, 50 stars from the Hyades and Coma Berenices clusters and 6 field stars (including the Sun) with precise age measurements to calibrate the gyrochronology relation, whilst fully accounting for measurement uncertainties in all observable quantities. We calibrated a relation of the form $P=A^n\times(B-V-c)^b$, where $P$ is rotation period in days, $A$ is age in Myr, $B$ and $V$ are magnitudes and $a$, $b$ and $n$ are the free parameters of our model. We found $a = 0.40^{+0.3}_{-0.05}$, $b = 0.31^{+0.05}_{-0.02}$ and $n = 0.55^{+0.02}_{-0.09}$. Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods were used to explore the posterior probability distribution functions of the gyrochronology parameters and we carefully checked the effects of leaving out parts of our sample, leading us to find that no single relation beween rotation period, colour and age can adequately describe all the subsets of our data. The Kepler asteroseismic stars, cluster stars and local field stars cannot all be described by the same gyrochronology relation. The Kepler asteroseismic stars may be subject to observational biases, however the clusters show unexpected deviations from the predicted behaviour, providing concerns for the overall reliability of gyrochronology as a dating method.
  • We report the first planet discovery from the two-wheeled Kepler (K2) mission: HIP 116454 b. The host star HIP 116454 is a bright (V = 10.1, K = 8.0) K1-dwarf with high proper motion, and a parallax-based distance of 55.2 +/- 5.4 pc. Based on high-resolution optical spectroscopy, we find that the host star is metal-poor with [Fe/H] = -.16 +/- .18, and has a radius R = 0.716 +/- .0024 R_sun and mass M = .775 +/- .027 Msun. The star was observed by the Kepler spacecraft during its Two-Wheeled Concept Engineering Test in February 2014. During the 9 days of observations, K2 observed a single transit event. Using a new K2 photometric analysis technique we are able to correct small telescope drifts and recover the observed transit at high confidence, corresponding to a planetary radius of Rp = 2.53 +/- 0.18 Rearth. Radial velocity observations with the HARPS-N spectrograph reveal a 11.82 +/- 1.33 Mearth planet in a 9.1 day orbit, consistent with the transit depth, duration, and ephemeris. Follow-up photometric measurements from the MOST satellite confirm the transit observed in the K2 photometry and provide a refined ephemeris, making HIP 116454 b amenable for future follow-up observations of this latest addition to the growing population of transiting super-Earths around nearby, bright stars.
  • In today's mailing, Hogg et al. propose image modeling techniques to maintain 10-ppm-level precision photometry in Kepler data with only two working reaction wheels. While these results are relevant to many scientific goals for the repurposed mission, all modeling efforts so far have used a toy model of the Kepler telescope. Because the two-wheel performance of Kepler remains to be determined, we advocate for the consideration of an alternate strategy for a >1 year program that maximizes the science return from the "low-torque" fields across the ecliptic plane. Assuming we can reach the precision of the original Kepler mission, we expect to detect 800 new planet candidates in the first year of such a mission. Our proposed strategy has benefits for transit timing variation and transit duration variation studies, especially when considered in concert with the future TESS mission. We also expect to help address the first key science goal of Kepler: the frequency of planets in the habitable zone as a function of spectral type.