• At redshift z=0.03, the recently-discovered SN 2017egm is the nearest Type I superluminous supernova (SLSN) to date, and first near the center of a massive spiral galaxy (NGC 3191). Using SDSS spectra of NGC 3191, we find a metallicity ~2 Z$_\odot$ at the nucleus and ~1.3 Z$_\odot$ for a star forming region at a radial offset similar to SN 2017egm. Archival radio-to-UV photometry reveals a star-formation rate ~15 M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ (with ~70% dust-obscured), which can account for a Swift X-ray detection, and stellar mass ~$10^{10.7}$ M$_\odot$. We model the early UV-optical light curves with a magnetar central-engine model, using the Bayesian light curve fitting tool MOSFiT. The fits indicate ejecta mass 2-4 M$_\odot$, spin period 4-6 ms, magnetic field (0.7-1.7)$\times 10^{14}$G, and kinetic energy 1-2 $\times10^{51}$ erg. These parameters are consistent with the overall distributions for SLSNe, modeled by Nicholl et al (2017), although the derived mass and spin are towards the low end, possibly indicating enhanced loss of mass and angular momentum before explosion. This has two implications: (i) SLSNe can occur at solar metallicity, although with a low fraction ~10%; and (ii) metallicity has at most a modest effect on their properties. Both conclusions are in line with results for long gamma-ray bursts. Assuming a monotonic rise gives an explosion date MJD $57889\pm1$. However, a short-lived excess in the data relative to the best-fitting models may indicate an early-time `bump'. If confirmed, SN 2017egm would be the first SLSN with a spectrum during the bump-phase; this shows the same O II lines seen at maximum light, which may be an important clue for explaining these bumps.
  • We present the first results from a recently concluded study of GRBs at $z\gtrsim5$ with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Spanning $1$ to $85.5$ GHz and 7 epochs from 1.5 to 82.3 d, our observations of GRB 140311A are the most detailed joint radio and millimeter observations of a GRB afterglow at $z\gtrsim5$ to date. In conjunction with optical/near-IR and X-ray data, the observations can be understood in the framework of radiation from a single blast wave shock with energy $E_{\rm K,iso}\approx8.5\times10^{53}$ erg expanding into a constant density environment with density, $n_0\approx8\,{\rm cm}^{-3}$. The X-ray and radio observations require a jet break at $t_{\rm jet}\approx0.6$ d, yielding an opening angle of $\theta_{\rm jet}\approx4^{\circ}$ and a beaming-corrected blast wave kinetic energy of $E_{\rm K}\approx2.2\times10^{50}$ erg. The results from our radio follow-up and multi-wavelength modeling lend credence to the hypothesis that detected high-redshift GRBs may be more tightly beamed than events at lower redshift. We do not find compelling evidence for reverse shock emission, which may be related to fast cooling driven by the moderately high circumburst density.
  • We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volume-limited sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, however, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volume-limited sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify SN 2005io as SN 1987A-like here for the first time), and peculiar subtypes. The relative fractions of Type Ia SNe, Type II SNe, and stripped-envelope SNe in the local universe are not affected, but those of some subtypes are. Most significantly, after discussing the often unclear boundary between SNe Ib and Ic when only noisy spectra are available, we find a higher SN Ib fraction and a lower SN Ic fraction than calculated by Li et al. (2011b): spectroscopically normal SNe Ib occur in the local universe $1.7 \pm 0.9$ times more often than do normal SNe Ic.
  • Herein we analyse late-time (post-plateau; 103 < t < 1229 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.016), hydrogen-rich Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP). Our newly constructed sample contains 91 nebular spectra of 38 SNe IIP, which is the largest dataset of its kind ever analysed in one study, and many of the objects have complementary photometric data. We determined the peak and total luminosity, velocity of the peak, HWHM intensity, and profile shape for many emission lines. Temporal evolution of these values and various flux ratios are studied. We also investigate the correlations between these measurements and photometric observables, such as the peak and plateau absolute magnitudes and the late-time light curve decline rates in various optical bands. The strongest and most robust result we find is that the luminosities of all spectral features (except those of helium) tend to be higher in objects with steeper late-time V-band decline rates. A steep late-time V-band slope likely arises from less efficient trapping of gamma-rays and positrons, which could be caused by multidimensional effects such as clumping of the ejecta or asphericity of the explosion itself. Furthermore, if gamma-rays and positrons can escape more easily, then so can photons via the observed emission lines, leading to more luminous spectral features. It is also shown that SNe IIP with larger progenitor stars have ejecta with a more physically extended oxygen layer that is well-mixed with the hydrogen layer. In addition, we find a subset of objects with evidence for asymmetric Ni-56 ejection, likely bipolar in shape. We also compare our observations to theoretical late-time spectral models of SNe IIP from two separate groups and find moderate-to-good agreement with both sets of models. Our SNe IIP spectra are consistent with models of 12-15 M_Sun progenitor stars having relatively low metallicity (Z $\le$ 0.01).
  • We present optical spectroscopy, ultraviolet to infrared imaging and X-ray observations of the intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT) SN 2010da in NGC 300 (d=1.86 Mpc) spanning from -6 to +6 years relative to the time of outburst in 2010. Based on the light curve and multi-epoch SEDs of SN 2010da, we conclude that the progenitor of SN 2010da is a ~10-12 Msol yellow supergiant possibly transitioning into a blue loop phase. During outburst, SN 2010da had a peak absolute magnitude of M<-10.4 mag, dimmer than other ILOTs and supernova impostors. We detect multi-component hydrogen Balmer, Paschen, and Ca II emission lines in our high-resolution spectra, which indicate a dusty and complex circumstellar environment. Since the 2010 eruption, the star has brightened by a factor of ~5 and remains highly variable in the optical. Furthermore, we detect SN 2010da in archival Swift and Chandra observations as an ultraluminous X-ray source (L~6x10^{39} erg/s). We additionally attribute He II 4686 Angstrom and coronal Fe emission lines in addition to a steady X-ray luminosity of ~10^{37} erg/s to the presence of a compact companion.
  • We present the discovery of the X-ray and optical afterglows of the short-duration GRB 150101B, pinpointing the event to an early-type host galaxy at z=0.1343 +/- 0.0030. This makes GRB 150101B the most nearby short GRB with an early-type host galaxy discovered to date. Fitting the spectral energy distribution of the host galaxy results in an inferred stellar mass of ~7x10^10 M_sol, stellar population age of ~2-2.5 Gyr, and star formation rate of <0.4 M_sol yr^-1. The host of GRB 150101B is one of the largest and most luminous short GRB host galaxies, with a B-band luminosity of ~4.3L* and half-light radius of ~8 kpc. GRB 150101B is located at a projected distance of 7.35 +/- 0.07 kpc from its host center, and lies on a faint region of its host rest-frame optical light. Its location, combined with the lack of associated supernova, is consistent with a NS-NS/NS-BH merger progenitor. From modeling the evolution of the broad-band afterglow, we calculate isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of ~1.3x10^49 erg and ~(6-14)x10^51 erg, respectively, a circumburst density of ~(0.8-4)x10^-5 cm^-3, and a jet opening angle of >9 deg. Using observations extending to ~30 days, we place upper limits of <(2-4)x10^41 erg s^-1 on associated kilonova emission. We compare searches following previous short GRBs to existing kilonova models, and demonstrate the difficulty of performing effective kilonova searches from cosmological short GRBs using current ground-based facilities. We show that at the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO horizon distance of 200 Mpc, searches reaching depths of ~23-24 AB mag are necessary to probe a meaningful range of kilonova models.
  • We present results of an optical search for Cepheid variable stars using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 19 hosts of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the maser-host galaxy NGC 4258, conducted as part of the SH0ES project (Supernovae and H0 for the Equation of State of dark energy). The targets include 9 newly imaged SN Ia hosts using a novel strategy based on a long-pass filter that minimizes the number of HST orbits required to detect and accurately determine Cepheid properties. We carried out a homogeneous reduction and analysis of all observations, including new universal variability searches in all SN Ia hosts, that yielded a total of 2200 variables with well-defined selection criteria -- the largest such sample identified outside the Local Group. These objects are used in a companion paper to determine the local value of H0 with a total uncertainty of 2.4%.
  • We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reduce the uncertainty in the local value of the Hubble constant (H_0) from 3.3% to 2.4%. Improvements come from new, near-infrared observations of Cepheid variables in 11 new hosts of recent SNe~Ia, more than doubling the sample of SNe~Ia having a Cepheid-calibrated distance for a total of 19; these leverage the magnitude-z relation based on 300 SNe~Ia at z<0.15. All 19 hosts and the megamaser system NGC4258 were observed with WFC3, thus nullifying cross-instrument zeropoint errors. Other improvements include a 33% reduction in the systematic uncertainty in the maser distance to NGC4258, more Cepheids and a more robust distance to the LMC from late-type DEBs, HST observations of Cepheids in M31, and new HST-based trigonometric parallaxes for Milky Way (MW) Cepheids. We consider four geometric distance calibrations of Cepheids: (i) megamasers in NGC4258, (ii) 8 DEBs in the LMC, (iii) 15 MW Cepheids with parallaxes, and (iv) 2 DEBs in M31. H_0 from each is 72.25+/-2.51, 72.04+/-2.67, 76.18+/-2.37, and 74.50+/-3.27 km/sec/Mpc, respectively. Our best estimate of 73.24+/-1.74 km/sec/Mpc combines the anchors NGC4258, MW, and LMC, and includes systematic errors for a final uncertainty of 2.4%. This value is 3.4 sigma higher than 66.93+/-0.62 km/sec/Mpc predicted by LambdaCDM with 3 neutrinos with mass 0.06 eV and the Planck data, but reduces to 2.1 sigma relative to the prediction of 69.3+/-0.7 km/sec/Mpc with the combination of WMAP+ACT+SPT+BAO, suggesting systematic uncertainties in CMB measurements may play a role in the tension. If we take the conflict between Planck and H_0 at face value, one plausible explanation could involve an additional source of dark radiation in the early Universe in the range of Delta N_eff=0.4-1. We anticipate significant improvements in H_0 from upcoming parallax measurements.
  • HST and ground based observations of the Type IIn SN 2010jl are analyzed, including photometry, spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, optical and NIR bands, 26-1128 days after first detection. At maximum the bolometric luminosity was $\sim 3\times10^{43}$ erg/s and even at 850 days exceeds $10^{42}$ erg/s. A NIR excess, dominating after 400 days, probably originates in dust in the circumstellar medium (CSM). The total radiated energy is $> 6.5\times10^{50}$ ergs, excluding the dust component. The spectral lines can be separated into one broad component due to electron scattering, and one narrow with expansion velocity $\sim 100$ km/s from the CSM. The broad component is initially symmetric around zero velocity but becomes blueshifted after $\sim 50$ days, while remaining symmetric about a shifted centroid velocity. Dust absorption in the ejecta is unlikely to explain the line shifts, and we attribute the shift instead to acceleration by the SN radiation. From the optical lines and the X-ray and dust properties, there is strong evidence for large scale asymmetries in the CSM. The ultraviolet lines indicate CNO processing in the progenitor, while the optical shows a number of narrow coronal lines excited by the X-rays. The bolometric light curve is consistent with a radiative shock in an $r^{-2}$ CSM with a mass loss rate of $\sim 0.1$ M_sun/yr. The total mass lost is $> 3$ M_sun. These properties are consistent with the SN expanding into a CSM characteristic of an LBV progenitor with a bipolar geometry. The apparent absence of nuclear processing is attributed to a CSM still opaque to electron scattering.
  • We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust extinction correction methods by asking the following -- does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n_e >~ 10^9 cm^-3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.
  • We report spectroscopic and photometric observations of the Type IIb SN 2011dh obtained between 4 and 34 days after the estimated date of explosion (May 31.5 UT). The data cover a wide wavelength range from 2,000 Angstroms in the UV to 2.4 microns in the NIR. Optical spectra provide line profiles and velocity measurements of HI, HeI, CaII and FeII that trace the composition and kinematics of the SN. NIR spectra show that helium is present in the atmosphere as early as 11 days after the explosion. A UV spectrum obtained with the STIS reveals that the UV flux for SN 2011dh is low compared to other SN IIb. The HI and HeI velocities in SN 2011dh are separated by about 4,000 km/s at all phases. We estimate that the H-shell of SN 2011dh is about 8 times less massive than the shell of SN 1993J and about 3 times more massive than the shell of SN 2008ax. Light curves (LC) for twelve passbands are presented. The maximum bolometric luminosity of $1.8 \pm 0.2 \times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ occurred about 22 days after the explosion. NIR emission provides more than 30% of the total bolometric flux at the beginning of our observations and increases to nearly 50% of the total by day 34. The UV produces 16% of the total flux on day 4, 5% on day 9 and 1% on day 34. We compare the bolometric light curves of SN 2011dh, SN 2008ax and SN 1993J. The LC are very different for the first twelve days after the explosions but all three SN IIb display similar peak luminosities, times of peak, decline rates and colors after maximum. This suggests that the progenitors of these SN IIb may have had similar compositions and masses but they exploded inside hydrogen shells that that have a wide range of masses. The detailed observations presented here will help evaluate theoretical models for this supernova and lead to a better understanding of SN IIb.
  • We present radio, optical/NIR, and X-ray observations of the afterglow of the short-duration 130603B, and uncover a break in the radio and optical bands at 0.5 d after the burst, best explained as a jet break with an inferred jet opening angle of 4-8 deg. GRB 130603B is only the third short GRB with a radio afterglow detection to date, and the first time that a jet break is evident in the radio band. We model the temporal evolution of the spectral energy distribution to determine the burst explosion properties and find an isotropic-equivalent kinetic energy of (0.6-1.7) x 10^51 erg and a circumburst density of 5 x 10^-3-30 cm^-3. From the inferred opening angle of GRB 130603B, we calculate beaming-corrected energies of Egamma (0.5-2) x 10^49 erg and EK (0.1-1.6) x 10^49 erg. Along with previous measurements and lower limits we find a median short GRB opening angle of 10 deg. Using the all-sky observed rate of 10 Gpc^-3 yr^-1, this implies a true short GRB rate of 20 yr^-1 within 200 Mpc, the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for neutron star binary mergers. Finally, we uncover evidence for significant excess emission in the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130603B at >1 d and conclude that the additional energy component could be due to fall-back accretion or spin-down energy from a magnetar formed following the merger.
  • We present high signal-to-noise ratio Gemini and MMT spectroscopy of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130606A at redshift z=5.913, discovered by Swift. This is the first high-redshift GRB afterglow to have spectra of comparable quality to those of z~6 quasars. The data exhibit a smooth continuum at near-infrared wavelengths that is sharply cut off blueward of 8410 Angs due to absorption from Ly-alpha at redshift z~5.91, with some flux transmitted through the Ly-alpha forest between 7000-7800 Angs. We use column densities inferred from metal absorption lines to constrain the metallicity of the host galaxy between a lower limit of [Si/H]>-1.7 and an upper limit of [S/H]<-0.5 set by the non-detection of S II absorption. We demonstrate consistency between the dramatic evolution in the transmission fraction of Ly-alpha seen in this spectrum over the redshift range z=4.9 to 5.85 with that previously measured from observations of high-redshift quasars. There is an extended redshift interval of Delta-z=0.12 in the Ly-alpha forest at z=5.77 with no detected transmission, leading to a 3-sigma upper limit on the mean Ly-alpha transmission fraction of <0.2% (or tau_eff(Ly-alpha) > 6.4). This is comparable to the lowest-redshift Gunn-Peterson troughs found in quasar spectra. We set a 2-sigma upper limit of 0.11 on the neutral fraction of the IGM at the redshift of the GRB from the lack of a Ly-alpha red damping wing, assuming a model with a constant neutral density. Some Ly-beta and Ly-gamma transmission is detected in this redshift window, indicating that it is not completely opaque, and hence that the IGM is nonetheless mostly ionized at these redshifts. GRB 130606A thus for the first time realizes the promise of GRBs as probes of the first galaxies and cosmic reionization.
  • Owing to their utility for measurements of cosmic acceleration, Type Ia supernovae (SNe) are perhaps the best-studied class of SNe, yet the progenitor systems of these explosions largely remain a mystery. A rare subclass of SNe Ia show evidence of strong interaction with their circumstellar medium (CSM), and in particular, a hydrogen-rich CSM; we refer to them as SNe Ia-CSM. In the first systematic search for such systems, we have identified 16 SNe Ia-CSM, and here we present new spectra of 13 of them. Six SNe Ia-CSM have been well-studied previously, three were previously known but are analyzed in-depth for the first time here, and seven are new discoveries from the Palomar Transient Factory. The spectra of all SNe Ia-CSM are dominated by H{\alpha} emission (with widths of ~2000 km/s) and exhibit large H{\alpha}/H{\beta} intensity ratios (perhaps due to collisional excitation of hydrogen via the SN ejecta overtaking slower-moving CSM shells); moreover, they have an almost complete lack of He I emission. They also show possible evidence of dust formation through a decrease in the red wing of H{\alpha} 75-100 d past maximum brightness, and nearly all SNe Ia-CSM exhibit strong Na I D absorption from the host galaxy. The absolute magnitudes (uncorrected for host-galaxy extinction) of SNe Ia-CSM are found to be -21.3 <= M_R <= -19 mag, and they also seem to show ultraviolet emission at early times and strong infrared emission at late times (but no detected radio or X-ray emission). Finally, the host galaxies of SNe Ia-CSM are all late-type spirals similar to the Milky Way, or dwarf irregulars like the Large Magellanic Cloud, which implies that these objects come from a relatively young stellar population. This work represents the most detailed analysis of the SN Ia-CSM class to date.
  • We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of PS1-10afx, a unique hydrogen-deficient superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z=1.388. The light curve peaked at z_P1=21.7 mag, making PS1-10afx comparable to the most luminous known SNe, with M_u = -22.3 mag. Our extensive optical and NIR observations indicate that the bolometric light curve of PS1-10afx rose on the unusually fast timescale of ~12 d to the extraordinary peak luminosity of 4.1e44 erg/s (M_bol = -22.8 mag) and subsequently faded rapidly. Equally important, the SED is unusually red for a SLSN, with a color temperature of 6800 K near maximum light, in contrast to previous H-poor SLSNe, which are bright in the UV. The spectra more closely resemble those of a normal SN Ic than any known SLSN, with a photospheric velocity of 11,000 km/s and evidence for line blanketing in the rest-frame UV. Despite the fast rise, these parameters imply a very large emitting radius (>5e15 cm). We demonstrate that no existing theoretical model can satisfactorily explain this combination of properties: (i) a nickel-powered light curve cannot match the combination of high peak luminosity with the fast timescale; (ii) models powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly-rotating magnetar predict significantly hotter and faster ejecta; and (iii) models invoking shock breakout through a dense circumstellar medium cannot explain the observed spectra or color evolution. The host galaxy is well detected in pre-explosion imaging with a luminosity near L*, a star formation rate of 15 M_sun/yr, and is fairly massive (2e10 M_sun), with a stellar population age of 1e8 yr, also in contrast to the dwarf hosts of known H-poor SLSNe. PS1-10afx is distinct from known examples of SLSNe in its spectra, colors, light-curve shape, and host galaxy properties, suggesting that it resulted from a different channel than other hydrogen-poor SLSNe.
  • We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z=0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of 4.6e9 M_Sun and a stellar population age of 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z=0.718 with a stellar mass of 1.4e9 M_Sun, a star formation rate of 16 M_Sun yr^-1, and a stellar population age of 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i>26 mag and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. The bursts have inferred circumburst densities of ~1e-4-1 cm^-3, and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of 1e50-1e51 erg. These events highlight the diversity of galaxies that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment (~1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to May 2012) and classify them as follows: late-type (50%), early-type (15%), inconclusive (20%), and host-less (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of >26 mag; 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments, and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. The most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions are ~60-80% and ~20-40%, respectively. We find no clear trend between gamma-ray duration and host type, and no change to the fractions when excluding events recently claimed as possible contaminants from the long GRB/collapsar population. Our reported demographics are consistent with a short GRB rate driven by both stellar mass and star formation.
  • For Gamma-Ray Burst 100901A, we have obtained Gemini-North and Very Large Telescope optical afterglow spectra at four epochs: one hour, one day, three days and one week after the burst, thanks to the afterglow remaining unusually bright at late times. Apart from a wealth of metal resonance lines, we also detect lines arising from fine-structure levels of the ground state of Fe II, and from metastable levels of Fe II and Ni II at the host redshift (z = 1.4084). These lines are found to vary significantly in time. The combination of the data and modelling results shows that we detect the fall of the Ni II 4 F9/2 metastable level population, which to date has not been observed. Assuming that the population of the excited states is due to the UV-radiation of the afterglow, we estimate an absorber distance of a few hundred pc. This appears to be a typical value when compared to similar studies. We detect two intervening absorbers (z = 1.3147, 1.3179). Despite the wide temporal range of the data, we do not see significant variation in the absorption lines of these two intervening systems.
  • GRB 120422A is a nearby (z = 0.283) long-duration GRB (LGRB) detected by Swift with E(gamma,iso) ~ 4.5\times1049 erg. It is also associated with the spectroscopically-confirmed broad-lined Type Ic SN 2012bz. These properties establish GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz as the sixth and newest member of the class of subluminous GRB/SNe. Observations also show that GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz occurred at an unusually large offset (~8 kpc) from the host galaxy nucleus, setting it apart from other nearby LGRBs and leading to speculation that the host environment may have undergone prior interaction activity. Here we present spectroscopic observations using the 6.5m Magellan telescope at Las Campanas. We extract spectra at three specific locations within the GRB/SN host galaxy, including the host nucleus, the explosion site, and the "bridge" of diffuse emission connecting these two regions. We measure a metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.3 +/- 0.1 and a star formation rate per unit area of 0.08 Mo/yr/kpc^2 at the host nucleus. At the GRB/SN explosion site we measure a comparable metallicity of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.2 +/- 0.1, but find a much lower star formation rate per unit area of 0.01 M/yr/kpc^2. We also compare the host galaxy of this event to the hosts other LGRBs, including samples of subluminous LGRBs and cosmological LGRBs, and find no systematic metallicity difference between the environments of these different subtypes.
  • In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilising our newly constructed set of SNID spectral templates. These templates allow us to accurately classify our entire dataset, and by doing so we are able to reclassify a handful of objects as bona fide SNe Ia and a few other objects as members of some of the peculiar SN Ia subtypes. In fact, our dataset includes spectra of nearly 90 spectroscopically peculiar SNe Ia. We also present spectroscopic host-galaxy redshifts of some SNe Ia where these values were previously unknown. [Abridged]
  • SN 2002es is a peculiar subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with a combination of observed characteristics never before seen in a SN Ia. At maximum light, SN 2002es shares spectroscopic properties with the underluminous SN 1991bg subclass of SNe Ia, but with substantially lower expansion velocities (~6000 km/s) more typical of the SN 2002cx subclass. Photometrically, SN 2002es differs from both SN 1991bg-like and SN 2002cx-like supernovae. Although at maximum light it is subluminous (M_B=-17.78 mag), SN 2002es has a relatively broad light curve (Dm15(B)=1.28 +/- 0.04 mag), making it a significant outlier in the light-curve width vs. luminosity relationship. We estimate a 56Ni mass of 0.17 +/- 0.05 M_sun synthesized in the explosion, relatively low for a SN Ia. One month after maximum light, we find an unexpected plummet in the bolometric luminosity. The late-time decay of the light curves is inconsistent with our estimated 56Ni mass, indicating that either the light curve was not completely powered by 56Ni decay or the ejecta became optically thin to gamma-rays within a month after maximum light. The host galaxy is classified as an S0 galaxy with little to no star formation, indicating the progenitor of SN 2002es is likely from an old stellar population. We also present a less extensive dataset for SN 1999bh, an object which shares similar observed properties. Both objects were found as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, allowing us to estimate that these objects should account for ~2.5% of SNe Ia within a fixed volume. We find that current theoretical models are unable to explain the observed of characteristics of SN 2002es.
  • The recent long-duration GRB 100316D, associated with supernova SN 2010bh and detected by Swift, is one of the nearest GRB-SNe ever observed (z = 0.059). This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the explosion environment on ~kpc scale in relation to the host galaxy complex. Here we present spatially-resolved spectrophotometry of the host galaxy, focusing on both the explosion site and the brightest star-forming regions. Using these data, we extract the spatial profiles of the relevant emission features (Halpha, Hbeta, [OIII] 5007A, and [NII] 6584A), and use these profiles to examine variations in metallicity and star formation rate as a function of position in the host galaxy. We conclude that GRB 100316D/SN2010bh occurred in a low-metallicity host galaxy, and that the GRB-SN explosion site corresponds to the region with the lowest metallicity and highest star formation rate sampled by our observations.
  • We present a chemical abundance analysis of the secondary star in the black hole binary V404 Cygni, using Keck I/HIRES spectra. We adopt a $\chi^2$-minimization procedure to derive the stellar parameters, taking into account any possible veiling from the accretion disk. With these parameters we determine the atmospheric abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni. The abundances of Al, Si, and Ti appear to be slightly enhanced when comparing with average values in thin-disk solar-type stars. The O abundance, derived from optical lines, is particularly enhanced in the atmosphere of the secondary star in V404 Cygni. This, together with the peculiar velocity of this system as compared with the Galactic velocity dispersion of thin-disk stars, suggests that the black hole formed in a supernova or hypernova explosion. We explore different supernova/hypernova models having various geometries to study possible contamination of nucleosynthetic products in the chemical abundance pattern of the secondary star. We find reasonable agreement between the observed abundances and the model predictions. However, the O abundance seems to be too high regardless of the choice of explosion energy or mass cut, when trying to fit other element abundances. Moreover, Mg appears to be underabundant for all explosion models, which produces Mg abundances roughly 2 times higher than the observed value.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry, as well as ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra, of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2001ay. At maximum light the Si II and Mg II lines indicated expansion velocities of 14,000 km/sec, while Si III and S II showed velocities of 9,000 km/sec There is also evidence for some unburned carbon at 12,000 km/sec. SN 2001ay exhibited a decline-rate parameter Delta m_15(B) = 0.68 \pm 0.05 mag; this and the B-band photometry at t > +25 d past maximum make it the most slowly declining Type Ia SN yet discovered. Three of four super-Chandrasekhar-mass candidates have decline rates almost as slow as this. After correction for Galactic and host-galaxy extinction, SN 2001ay had M_B = -19.19 and M_V = -19.17 mag at maximum light; thus, it was not overluminous in optical bands. In near-infrared bands it was overluminous only at the 2-sigma level at most. For a rise time of 18 d (explosion to bolometric maximum) the implied Ni-56 yield was (0.58 \pm 0.15)/alpha M_Sun, with alpha = L_max/E_Ni probably in the range 1.0 to 1.2. The Ni-56 yield is comparable to that of many Type Ia supernovae. The "normal" Ni-56 yield and the typical peak optical brightness suggest that the very broad optical light curve is explained by the trapping of the gamma rays in the inner regions.
  • We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope to determine the Hubble constant (H0) from optical and infrared observations of over 600 Cepheid variables in the host galaxies of 8 recent Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), providing the calibration for a mag-z relation of 253 SNe Ia. Increased precision over past measurements comes from: (1) more than doubling the number of infrared observations of Cepheids in nearby SN hosts; (2) increasing the sample of ideal SN Ia calibrators from six to eight; (3) increasing by 20% the number of Cepheids with infrared observations in the megamaser host NGC 4258; (4) reducing the difference in the mean metallicity of the Cepheid comparison samples from \Delta log [O/H] = 0.08 to 0.05; and (5) calibrating all optical Cepheid colors with one camera, WFC3, to remove cross-instrument zero-point errors. Uncertainty in H0 from beyond the 1st rung of the distance ladder is reduced from 3.5% to 2.3%. The measurement of H0 via the geometric distance to NGC 4258 is 74.8 \pm 3.1 km s- 1 Mpc-1, a 4.1% measurement including systematics. Better precision independent of NGC 4258 comes from two alternative Cepheid absolute calibrations: (1) 13 Milky Way Cepheids with parallaxes and (2) 92 Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud with multiple eclipsing binary distances, yielding 74.4 \pm 2.5 km s- 1 Mpc-1, a 3.4% uncertainty with systematics. Our best estimate uses all three calibrations but a larger uncertainty afforded from any two: H0 = 73.8 \pm 2.4 km s- 1 Mpc-1 including systematics, a 3.3% uncertainty. The improvement in H0, combined with WMAP7yr data, results in a constraint on the EOS parameter of dark energy of w = -1.08 \pm 0.10 and Neff = 4.2 \pm 0.7 for the number of relativistic species in the early universe. It also rules out the best-fitting gigaparsec-scale void models, posited as an alternative to dark energy. (abridged)