• Data sharing among partners---users, organizations, companies---is crucial for the advancement of data analytics in many domains. Sharing through secure computation and differential privacy allows these partners to perform private computations on their sensitive data in controlled ways. However, in reality, there exist complex relationships among members. Politics, regulations, interest, trust, data demands and needs are one of the many reasons. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to meet these conflicting relationships on data sharing. This paper presents Curie, an approach to exchange data among members whose membership has complex relationships. The CPL policy language that allows members to define the specifications of data exchange requirements is introduced. Members (partners) assert who and what to exchange through their local policies and negotiate a global sharing agreement. The agreement is implemented in a multi-party computation that guarantees sharing among members will comply with the policy as negotiated. The use of Curie is validated through an example of a health care application built on recently introduced secure multi-party computation and differential privacy frameworks, and policy and performance trade-offs are explored.
  • CleverHans is a software library that provides standardized reference implementations of adversarial example construction techniques and adversarial training. The library may be used to develop more robust machine learning models and to provide standardized benchmarks of models' performance in the adversarial setting. Benchmarks constructed without a standardized implementation of adversarial example construction are not comparable to each other, because a good result may indicate a robust model or it may merely indicate a weak implementation of the adversarial example construction procedure. This technical report is structured as follows. Section 1 provides an overview of adversarial examples in machine learning and of the CleverHans software. Section 2 presents the core functionalities of the library: namely the attacks based on adversarial examples and defenses to improve the robustness of machine learning models to these attacks. Section 3 describes how to report benchmark results using the library. Section 4 describes the versioning system.
  • For well over a quarter century, detection systems have been driven by models learned from input features collected from real or simulated environments. An artifact (e.g., network event, potential malware sample, suspicious email) is deemed malicious or non-malicious based on its similarity to the learned model at runtime. However, the training of the models has been historically limited to only those features available at runtime. In this paper, we consider an alternate learning approach that trains models using "privileged" information--features available at training time but not at runtime--to improve the accuracy and resilience of detection systems. In particular, we adapt and extend recent advances in knowledge transfer, model influence, and distillation to enable the use of forensic or other data unavailable at runtime in a range of security domains. An empirical evaluation shows that privileged information increases precision and recall over a system with no privileged information: we observe up to 7.7% relative decrease in detection error for fast-flux bot detection, 8.6% for malware traffic detection, 7.3% for malware classification, and 16.9% for face recognition. We explore the limitations and applications of different privileged information techniques in detection systems. Such techniques provide a new means for detection systems to learn from data that would otherwise not be available at runtime.