• We have used a gold nanohole array to trap single polystyrene nanoparticles, with a mean diameter of 30 nm, into separated hot spots located at connecting nanoslot regions. A high trap stiffness of approximately 0.85 fN/(nmmW) at a low incident laser intensity of ~0.51 mW/um2 at 980 nm was obtained. The experimental results were compared to the simulated trapping force and a reasonable match was achieved. This plasmonic array is useful for lab-on-a-chip applications and has particular appeal for trapping multiple nanoparticles with predefined separations or arranged in patterns in order to study interactions between them.
  • We calculate the force of a near-resonant guided light field of an ultrathin optical fiber on a two-level atom. We show that, if the atomic dipole rotates in the meridional plane, the magnitude of the force of the guided light depends on the field propagation direction. The chirality of the force arises as a consequence of the directional dependencies of the Rabi frequency of the guided driving field and the spontaneous emission from the atom. This provides a unique method for controlling atomic motion in the vicinity of an ultrathin fiber.
  • We present a novel approach to enhance the spontaneous emission rate of single quantum emitters in an optical nanofiber-based cavity by introducing a narrow air-filled groove into the cavity. Our results show that the Purcell factor for single quantum emitters located inside the groove of the nanofiber-based cavity can be at least six times greater than that for such an emitter on the fiber surface when using an optimized cavity mode and groove width. Moreover, the coupling efficiency of single quantum emitters into the guided mode of this nanofiber-based cavity can reach up to $\sim$ 80 $\%$ with only 35 cavity-grating periods. This new system has the potential to act as an all-fiber platform to realize efficient coupling of photons from single emitters into an optical fiber for quantum information applications.
  • We investigate the electric quadrupole interaction of an alkali-metal atom with guided light in the fundamental and higher-order modes of a vacuum-clad ultrathin optical fiber. We calculate the quadrupole Rabi frequency, the quadrupole oscillator strength, and their enhancement factors. In the example of a rubidium-87 atom, we study the dependencies of the quadrupole Rabi frequency on the quantum numbers of the transition, the mode type, the phase circulation direction, the propagation direction, the orientation of the quantization axis, the position of the atom, and the fiber radius. We find that the root-mean-square (rms) quadrupole Rabi frequency reduces quickly but the quadrupole oscillator strength varies slowly with increasing radial distance. We show that the enhancement factors of the rms Rabi frequency and the oscillator strength do not depend on any characteristics of the internal atomic states except for the atomic transition frequency. The enhancement factor of the oscillator strength can be significant even when the atom is far away from the fiber. We show that, in the case where the atom is positioned on the fiber surface, the oscillator strength for the quasicircularly polarized fundamental mode HE$_{11}$ has a local minimum at the fiber radius $a\simeq 107$ nm, and is larger than that for quasicircularly polarized higher-order hybrid modes, TE modes, and TM modes in the region $a<498.2$ nm.
  • We study spontaneous emission from a rubidium atom into the fundamental and higher-order modes of a vacuum-clad ultrathin optical fiber. We show that the spontaneous emission rate depends on the magnetic sublevel, the type of modes, the orientation of the quantization axis, and the fiber radius. We find that the rate of spontaneous emission into the TE modes is always symmetric with respect to the propagation directions. Directional asymmetry of spontaneous emission into other modes may appear when the quantization axis does not lie in the meridional plane containing the position of the atom. When the fiber radius is in the range from 330 nm to 450 nm, the spontaneous emission into the HE$_{21}$ modes is stronger than into the HE$_{11}$, TE$_{01}$, and TM$_{01}$ modes. At the cutoff for higher-order modes, the rates of spontaneous emission into guided and radiation modes undergo steep variations, which are caused by the changes in the mode structure. We show that the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the cyclic transition into the TM modes is unidirectional when the quantization axis lies at an appropriate azimuthal angle in the fiber transverse plane.
  • A pump source is one of the essential prerequisites in order to achieve lasing, and, in most cases, a stronger pump leads to higher laser power at the output. However, this behavior may be suppressed if two pump beams are used. In this work, it is shown that lasing around the 1600 nm band can be suppressed completely if two pumps, at wavelengths of 980 nm and 1550 nm, are applied simultaneously to a Yb:Er-doped microlaser, whereas it can be revived by switching one of them off. This phenomenon can be explained by assuming that the existence of one pump (980 nm) changes the role of the other pump (1550 nm); more specifically, the 1550 nm pump starts to consume the population inversion instead of increasing it when the 980 nm pump power exceeds a certain value. As a result, the two pump fields lead to a closed-loop transition within the gain medium (i.e., erbium ions). This study unveils an interplay similar with coherence effects between different pump pathways, which provides a reference for designing the laser pump and may have applications in lasing control.
  • We experimentally realized an optical nanofiber-based cavity by combining a 1-D photonic crystal and Bragg grating structures. The cavity morphology comprises a periodic, triplex air-cube introduced at the waist of the nanofiber. The cavity has been theoretically characterized using FDTD simulations to obtain the reflection and transmission spectra. We have also experimentally measured the transmission spectra and a Q-factor of ~784(87) for a very short periodic structure has been observed. The structure provides strong confinement of the cavity field and its potential for optical network integration makes it an ideal candidate for use in nanophotonic and quantum information systems.
  • A tunable, all-optical, coupling method has been realized for a high-\textit{Q} silica microsphere and an optical waveguide. By means of a novel optical nanopositioning method, induced thermal expansion of an asymmetric microsphere stem for laser powers up to 171~mW has been observed and used to fine tune the microsphere-waveguide coupling. Microcavity displacements ranging from (0.612~$\pm$~0.13) -- (1.5 $\pm$ 0.13) $\mu$m and nanometer scale sensitivities varying from (2.81 $\pm$ 0.08) -- (7.39 $\pm$ 0.17) nm/mW, with an apparent linear dependency of coupling distance on stem laser heating, were obtained. Using this method, the coupling was altered such that different coupling regimes could be explored for particular samples. This tunable coupling method, in principle, could be incorporated into lab-on-a-chip microresonator systems, photonic molecule systems, and other nanopositioning frameworks.
  • Tapered fibers with diameters ranging from 1-4 micron are widely used to excite the whispering-gallery (WG) modes of microcavities. Typically, the transmission spectrum of a WG cavity coupled to a waveguide around a resonance assumes a Lorentzian dip morphology due to resonant absorption of the light within the cavity. In this paper, we demonstrate that the transmission spectra of a WG cavity coupled with an ultrathin fiber (500-700nm) may exhibit both Lorentzian dips and peaks, depending on the gap between the fiber and the microcavity. By considering the large scattering loss of off-resonant light from the fiber within the coupling region, this phenomenon can be attributed to partially resonant light bypassing the lossy scattering region via WG modes, allowing it to be coupled both to and from the cavity, thence manifesting as Lorentzian peaks within the transmission spectra, which implies the system could be implemented within a bandpass filter framework.
  • We present a systematic treatment of higher-order modes of vacuum-clad ultrathin optical fibers. We show that, for a given fiber, the higher-order modes have larger penetration lengths, larger effective mode radii, and larger fractional powers outside the fiber than the fundamental mode. We calculate, both analytically and numerically, the Poynting vector, propagating power, energy, angular momentum, and helicity (or chirality) of the guided light. The axial and azimuthal components of the Poynting vector can be negative with respect to the direction of propagation and the direction of phase circulation, respectively, depending on the position, the mode type, and the fiber parameters. The orbital and spin parts of the Poynting vector may also have opposite signs in some regions of space. We show that the angular momentum per photon decreases with increasing fiber radius and increases with increasing azimuthal mode order. The orbital part of angular momentum of guided light depends not only on the phase gradient but also on the field polarization, and is positive with respect to the direction of the phase circulation axis. Meanwhile, depending on the mode type, the spin and surface parts of angular momentum and the helicity of the field can be negative with respect to the direction of the phase circulation axis.
  • In this work, we show that the application of a sol-gel coating renders a microbubble whispering gallery resonator into an active device. During the fabrication of the resonator, a thin layer of erbium-doped sol-gel is applied to a tapered microcapillary, then a microbubble with a wall thickness of 1.3 $\mu$m is formed with the rare earth diffused into its walls. The doped microbubble is pumped at 980 nm and lasing in the emission band of the Er$^{3+}$ ions with a wavelength of 1535 nm is observed. The laser wavelength can be tuned by aerostatic pressure tuning of the whispering gallery modes of the microbubble. Up to 240 pm tuning is observed with 2 bar of applied pressure. It is shown that the doped microbubble could be used as a compact, tunable laser source. The lasing microbubble can also be used to improve sensing capabilities in optofluidic sensing applications.
  • Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre inter-act over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interac-tions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the cou-pling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal opti-cal binding interactions of chains of 3 {\mu}m polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observa-tion of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of parti-cle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoreti-cal analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promis-ing method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.
  • In whispering gallery mode resonator sensing applications, the conventional way to detect a change in the parameter to be measured is by observing the steady state transmission spectrum through the coupling waveguide. Alternatively, cavity ring-up spectroscopy (CRUS) sensing can be achieved transiently. In this work, we investigate CRUS using coupled mode equations and find analytical solutions with a large spectral broadening approximation of the input pulse. The relationships between the frequency detuning, coupling gap and ring-up peak height are determined and experimentally verified using an ultrahigh \textit{Q}-factor silica microsphere. This work shows that distinctive dispersive and dissipative transient sensing can be realised by simply measuring the peak height of the CRUS signal, which might improve the data collection rate.
  • While conventional optical trapping techniques can trap objects with submicron dimensions, the underlying limits imposed by the diffraction of light generally restrict their use to larger or higher refractive index particles. As the index and diameter decrease, the trapping difficulty rapidly increases; hence, the power requirements for stable trapping become so large as to quickly denature the trapped objects in such diffraction-limited systems. Here, we present an evanescent field based device capable of confining low index nanoscale particles using modest optical powers as low as 1.2 mW, with additional applications in the field of cold atom trapping. Our experiment uses a nanostructured optical micro-nanofiber to trap 200 nm, low index contrast, fluorescent particles within the structured region, thereby overcoming diffraction limitations. We analyze the trapping potential of this device both experimentally and theoretically, and show how strong optical traps are achieved with low input powers.
  • Frequency comb generation in microresonators at visible wavelengths has found applications in a variety of areas such as metrology, sensing, and imaging. To achieve Kerr combs based on four-wave mixing in a microresonator, dispersion must be in the anomalous regime. In this work, we demonstrate dispersion engineering in a microbubble resonator (MBR) fabricated by a two-CO$_2$ laser beam technique. By decreasing the wall thickness of the MBR down to 1.4 $\mu$m, the zero dispersion wavelength shifts to values shorter than 764 nm, making phase matching possible around 765 nm. With the optical \textit{Q}-factor of the MBR modes being greater than $10^7$, four-wave mixing is observed at 765 nm for a pump power of 3 mW. By increasing the pump power, parametric oscillation is achieved, and a frequency comb with 14 comb lines is generated at visible wavelengths.
  • Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed and, recently, several schemes to implement optical memories have been proposed. We also discuss some possible directions where this research field may head, in particular in relation to the use of optical nanofibres that can support higher-order modes with an associated orbital angular momentum.
  • The tunability of an optical cavity is an essential requirement for many areas of research. Here, we use the Pound-Drever-Hall technique to lock a laser to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) of a microbubble resonator, to show that linear tuning of the WGM, and the corresponding locked laser, display almost zero hysteresis. By applying aerostatic pressure to the interior surface of the microbubble resonator, optical mode shift rates of around $58$ GHz/MPa are achieved. The microbubble can measure pressure with a detection limit of $2\times 10^{-4}$ MPa, which is an improvement made on pressure sensing using this device. The long-term frequency stability of this tuning method for different input pressures is measured. The frequency noise of the WGM measured over $10$ minutes for an input pressure of $0.5$ MPa, has a maximum standard deviation of $36$ MHz.
  • We describe a novel method for making microbottle-shaped lasers by using a CO$_2$ laser to melt Er:Yb glass onto silica microcapillaries or fibres. This is realised by the fact that the two glasses have different melting points. The CO$_2$ laser power is controlled to flow the doped glass around the silica cylinder. In the case of a capillary, the resulting geometry is a hollow, microbottle-shaped resonator. This is a simple method for fabricating a number of glass WGM lasers with a wide range of sizes on a single, micron-scale structure. The Er:Yb doped glass outer layer is pumped at 980 nm via a tapered optical fibre and whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasing is recorded around 1535 nm. This structure facilitates a new way to thermo-optically tune the microlaser modes by passing gas through the capillary. The cooling effect of the gas flow shifts the WGMs towards shorter wavelengths, thus thermal tuning of the lasing modes over 70 GHz is achieved. Results are fitted using the theory of hot wire anemometry, allowing the flow rate to be calibrated with a flow sensitivity as high as 100 GHz/sccm. Strain tuning of the microlaser modes by up to 50 GHz is also demonstrated.
  • Sensors based on whispering gallery resonators have minute footprints and can push achievable sensitivities and resolutions to their limits. Here, we use a microbubble resonator, with a wall thickness of 500 nm and an intrinsic Q-factor of $10^7$ in the telecommunications C-band, to investigate aerostatic pressure sensing via stress and strain of the material. The microbubble is made using two counter-propagating CO$_2$ laser beams focused onto a microcapillary. The measured sensitivity is 19 GHz/bar at 1.55 $\mu$m. We show that this can be further improved to 38 GHz/bar when tested at the 780 nm wavelength range. In this case, the resolution for pressure sensing can reach 0.17 mbar with a Q-factor higher than $5\times10^7$.
  • Ultrathin optical fibres integrated into cold atom setups are proving to be ideal building blocks for atom-photon hybrid quantum networks. Such optical nanofibres (ONF) can be used for the demonstration of nonlinear optics and quantum interference phenomena in atomic media. Here, we report on the observation of multilevel cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofibre to interface cold $^{87}$Rb atoms through the intense evanescent fields that can be achieved at ultralow probe and coupling powers. Both the probe (at 780 nm) and the coupling (at 776 nm) beams propagate through the nanofibre. The observed multipeak transparency spectra of the probe beam could offer a method for simultaneously slowing down multiple wavelengths in an optical nanofibre or for generating ONF-guided entangled beams, showing the potential of such an atom-nanofibre system for quantum information. We also demonstrate all-optical-switching in the all fibred system using the obtained EIT effect.
  • The evanescent field of an optical nanofiber presents a versatile interface for the manipulation of micron-scale particles in dispersion. Here, we present a detailed study of the optical binding interactions of a pair of 3.13 $\mu$m SiO$_2$ particles in the nanofiber evanescent field. Preferred equilibrium positions for the spheres as a function of nanofiber diameter and sphere size are discussed. We demonstrated optical propulsion and self-arrangement of chains of one to seven 3.13 $\mu$m SiO$_2$ particles; this effect is associated with optical binding via simulated trends of multiple scattering effects. Incorporating an optical nanofiber into an optical tweezers setup facilitated the individual and collective introduction of selected particles to the nanofiber evanescent field for experiments. Computational simulations provide insight into the dynamics behind the observed behavior.
  • A hollow bottle-like microresonator (BLMR) with ultra-high quality factor is fabricated from a microcapillary with nearly parabolic profile. At 1.55 $\mu m$ pumping, degenerate four-wave mixing can be observed for a BLMR of diameter 102 $\mu$m. The parabolic profile of the BLMR guarantees a nearly zero waveguide dispersion, which is theoretically discussed in detail. From the simulation, at 1.55 $\mu$m wavelength in such a BLMR, the fundamental bottle mode is in the anomalous dispersion regime, whilst the ordinary whispering gallery mode (WGM) confined at the center of the BLMR is in the normal dispersion regime. Experimentally, no degenerate FWM is observed for the WGM selected by positioning the coupling tapered fiber in the same BLMR. Furthermore, dispersion tuning is briefly discussed. As the work predicted, the BLMR shows promise for the implementation of sparsely distributed, widely spanned frequency combs at the telecommunication wavelength.
  • We report on the fabrication of an ultrahigh quality factor, bottle-like microresonator from a microcapillary, and the realization of Raman lasing therein at pump wavelengths of $1.55~\mathrm{\mu m}$ and $780~\mathrm{nm}$. The dependence of the Raman laser threshold on mode volume is investigated. The mode volume of the fundamental bottle mode is calculated and compared with that of a microsphere. Third-order cascaded Raman lasing was observed when pumped at $780~\mathrm{nm}$. In principle, Raman lasing in a hollow bottle-like microresonator can be used in sensing applications. As an example, we briefly discuss the possibility of a high dynamic range, high resolution aerostatic pressure sensor.
  • Dissipative optomechanics has some advantages in cooling compared to the conventional dispersion dominated systems. Here, we study the optical response of a cantilever-like, silica, microsphere pendulum, evanescently coupled to a fiber taper. In a whispering gallery mode resonator the cavity mode and motion of the pendulum result in both dispersive and dissipative optomechanical interactions. This unique mechanism leads to an experimentally observable, asymmetric response function of the transduction spectrum which can be explained using coupled-mode theory. The optomechanical transduction, and its relationship to the external coupling gap, are investigated and we show that the experimental behavior is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. A deep understanding of this mechanism is necessary to explore trapping and cooling in dissipative optomechanical systems.
  • Coupled-mode induced transparency is realized in a single microbubble whispering gallery mode resonator. Using aerostatic tuning, we find that the pressure induced shifting rates are different for different radial order modes. A finite element simulation considering both the strain and stress effects shows a GHz/bar difference and this is confirmed by experiments. A transparency spectrum is obtained when a first order mode shifts across a higher order mode through precise pressure tuning. The resulting lineshapes are fitted with the theory. This work lays a foundation for future applications in microbubble sensing.