• We have carried out a theoretical analysis of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson effective field theory of a classical incommensurate CDW in the presence of weak quenched disorder. While the possibility a sharp phase transition and long-range CDW order are precluded in such systems, we show that any discrete symmetry breaking aspect of the charge order -- nematicity in the case of the unidirectional (stripe) CDW we consider explicitly -- generically survives up to a non-zero critical disorder strength. Such "vestigial order", which is subject to unambiguous macroscopic detection, can serve as an avatar of what would be CDW order in the ideal, zero disorder limit. Various recent experiments in the pseudo-gap regime of the hole-doped cuprate high-temperature superconductors are readily interpreted in light of these results.
  • At small momenta, the Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman (GMP) mode in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect can be identified with gapped nematic fluctuations in the isotropic FQH liquid. This correspondence would be exact as the GMP mode softens upon approach to the putative point of a quantum phase transition to a FQH nematic. Motivated by these considerations as well as by suggestive evidence of an FQH nematic in tilted field experiments, we have sought evidence of such a nematic FQHE in a microscopic model of interacting electrons in the lowest Landau level at filling factor 1/3. Using a family of anisotropic Laughlin states as trial wave functions, we find a continuous quantum phase transition between the isotropic Laughlin liquid and the FQH nematic. Results of numerical exact diagonalization also suggest that rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken, and that the phase diagram of the model contains both a nematic and a stripe phase.
  • We address the problem of a lightly doped spin-liquid through a large-scale density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) study of the $t$-$J$ model on a Kagome lattice with a small but non-zero concentration, $\delta$, of doped holes. It is now widely accepted that the undoped ($\delta=0$) spin 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a spin-liquid groundstate. Theoretical arguments have been presented that light doping of such a spin-liquid could give rise to a high temperature superconductor or an exotic topological Fermi liquid metal (FL$^\ast$). Instead, we infer that the doped holes form an insulating charge-density wave state with one doped-hole per unit cell - i.e. a Wigner crystal (WC). Spin correlations remain short-ranged, as in the spin-liquid parent state, from which we infer that the state is a crystal of spinless holons (WC$^\ast$), rather than of holes. Our results may be relevant to Kagome lattice Herbertsmithite $\rm ZnCu_3(OH)_6Cl_2$ upon doping.
  • In the context of the relaxation time approximation to Boltzmann transport theory, we examine the behavior of the Hall number, $n_H$, of a metal in the neighborhood of a Lifshitz transition from a closed Fermi surface to open sheets. We find a universal non-analytic dependence of $n_H$ on the electron density in the high field limit, but a non-singular dependence at low fields. The existence of an assumed nematic transition produces a doping dependent $n_H$ similar to that observed in recent experiments in the high temperature superconductor YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-x}$.
  • The existence of charge density wave (CDW) correlations in cuprate superconductors has now been established. However, the nature of the ground state order has remained uncertain because disorder and the presence of superconductivity typically limit the CDW correlation lengths to a dozen unit cells or less. Here we explore the CDW correlations in YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) ortho-II and ortho-VIII crystals, which belong to the cleanest available cuprate family, at magnetic fields in excess of the resistive upper critical field (Hc2) where the superconductivity is heavily suppressed. We find an incommensurate, unidirectional CDW with a well-defined onset at a critical field strength that is proportional to Hc2. It is related to but distinct from the short-range bidirectional CDW that exists at zero magnetic field. The unidirectional CDW possesses a long inplane correlation length as well as significant correlations between neighboring CuO2 planes, yielding a correlation volume that is at least 2 - 3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the zero-field CDW. This is by far the largest CDW correlation volume observed in any cuprate crystal and so is presumably representative of the high-field ground-state of an "ideal" disorder-free cuprate.
  • Recent experiments in optimally hole-doped iron arsenides have revealed a novel magnetically ordered ground state that preserves tetragonal symmetry, consistent with either a charge-spin density wave (CSDW), which displays a non-uniform magnetization, or a spin-vortex crystal (SVC), which displays a non-collinear magnetization. Here we show that, similarly to the partial melting of the usual stripe antiferromagnet into a nematic phase, either of these phases can also melt in two stages. As a result, intermediate paramagnetic phases with vestigial order appears: a checkerboard charge density-wave for the CSDW ground state, characterized by an Ising-like order parameter, and a remarkable spin-vorticity density-wave for the SVC ground state -- a triplet d-density wave characterized by a vector chiral order parameter. We propose experimentally detectable signatures of these phases, show that their fluctuations can enhance the superconducting transition temperature, and discuss their relevance to other correlated materials.
  • Using an exact numerical solution and semiclassical analysis, we investigate quantum oscillations (QOs) in a model of a bilayer system with an anisotropic (elliptical) electron pocket in each plane. Key features of QO experiments in the high temperature superconducting cuprate YBCO can be reproduced by such a model, in particular the pattern of oscillation frequencies (which reflect "magnetic breakdown" between the two pockets) and the polar and azimuthal angular dependence of the oscillation amplitudes. However, the requisite magnetic breakdown is possible only under the assumption that the horizontal mirror plane symmetry is spontaneously broken and that the bilayer tunneling, $t_\perp$, is substantially renormalized from its `bare' value. Under the assumption that $t_\perp= \tilde{Z}t_\perp^{(0)}$, where $\tilde{Z}$ is a measure of the quasiparticle weight, this suggests that $\tilde{Z} \lesssim 1/20$. Detailed comparisons with new YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{6.58}$ QO data, taken over a very broad range of magnetic field, confirm specific predictions made by the breakdown scenario.
  • The "d-wave" symmetry of the superconducting order in the cuprate high temperature superconductors is a well established fact, and one which identifies them as "unconventional." However, in macroscopic contexts -- including many potential applications ({\it i.e.} superconducting "wires") -- the material is a composite of randomly oriented superconducting grains in a metallic matrix, in which Josephson coupling between grains mediates the onset of long-range phase coherence. Here, we analyze the physics at length scales large compared to the size of such grains, and in particular the macroscopic character of the long-range order that emerges. While XY-glass order and macroscopic d-wave superconductivity may be possible, we show that under many circumstances -- especially when the d-wave superconducting grains are embedded in a metallic matrix -- the most likely order has global s-wave symmetry.
  • Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have recently been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked.
  • We have carried out density-matrix-renormalization group (DMRG) calculations for the problem of one doped hole in a two-leg $t-J$ ladder. Recent studies have concluded that exotic "Mott" physics --- arising from the projection onto the space of no double-occupied sites --- is manifest in this model system, leading to charge localization and a new mechanism for charge modulation. In contrast, we show that there is no localization and that the charge density modulation arises when the minimum in the quasiparticle dispersion moves away from $\pi$. Although singular changes in the quasiparticle dispersion do occur as a function of model parameters, all the DMRG results can be qualitatively understood from a non-interacting "band-structure" perspective.
  • The discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the cuprates in 1986 triggered a spectacular outpouring of creative and innovative scientific inquiry. Much has been learned over the ensuing 28 years about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in this strongly correlated electron system. This progress has been made possible by improvements in sample quality, coupled with the development and refinement of advanced experimental techniques. In part, avenues of inquiry have been motivated by theoretical developments, and in part new theoretical frameworks have been conceived to account for unanticipated experimental observations. An overall qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved, while profound unresolved issues have come into increasingly sharp focus concerning the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the "normal" state at elevated temperatures. New conceptual approaches, drawing from string theory, quantum information theory, and various numerically implemented approximate approaches to problems of strong correlations are being explored as ways to come to grips with this rich tableaux of interrelated phenomena.
  • Recent analysis has confirmed earlier general arguments that the Kerr response vanishes in any time-reversal invariant system which satisfies the Onsager relations. Thus, the widely cited relation between natural optical activity (gyrotropy) and the Kerr response, employed in Hosur \textit{et al}, Phys. Rev. B \textbf{87}, 115116 (2013), is incorrect. However, there is increasingly clear experimental evidence that, as argued in our paper, the onset of an observable Kerr-signal in the cuprates reflects point-group symmetry rather than time-reversal symmetry breaking.
  • Almost forty years ago, Phil Anderson introduced the negative U center to account for the fact that most glasses and amorphous semiconductors are diamagnetic. This paper has been highly influential, but certainly does not rank among Phil's most famous works. However, focusing on it enables us to reacquaint a younger generation with another of Phil's contributions, and to use this as a springboard to discuss some forward looking extensions that continue to fascinate us.
  • In contrast to conventional s-wave superconductivity, unconventional (e.g. p or d-wave) superconductivity is strongly suppressed even by relatively weak disorder. Upon approaching the superconductor-metal transition, the order parameter amplitude becomes increasingly inhomogeneous leading to effective granularity and a phase ordering transition described by the Mattis model of spin glasses. One consequence of this is that at low enough temperatures, between the clean unconventional superconducting and the diffusive metallic phases, there is necessarily an intermediate superconducting phase which exhibits s-wave symmetry on macroscopic scales.
  • The topological physics of quantum Hall states is efficiently encoded in purely topological quantum field theories of the Chern-Simons type. The reliable inclusion of low-energy dynamical properties in a continuum description however typically requires proximity to a quantum critical point. We construct a field theory that describes the quantum transition from an isotropic to a nematic Laughlin liquid. The soft mode associated with this transition approached from the isotropic side is identified as the familiar intra-Landau level Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman mode. We obtain z=2 dynamic scaling at the critical point and a description of Goldstone and defect physics on the nematic side. Despite the very different physical motivation, our field theory is essentially identical to a recent "geometric" field theory for a Laughlin liquid proposed by Haldane.
  • We have performed extensive density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) studies of the Hubbard model on a honeycomb ladder. The band structure (with Hubbard U=0) exhibits an unusual quadratic band touching at half filling, which is associated with a quantum Lifshitz transition from a band insulator to a metal. %SAK as a function of a third-neighbor hopping parameter. For one electron per site, non-zero $U$ drives the system into an insulating state in which there is no pair-binding between added electrons; this implies that superconductivity driven directly by the repulsive electron-electron interactions is unlikely in the regime of small doping, $x\ll 1$. However, the divergent density of states as $x\to 0$, the large values of the phonon frequencies, and an unusual correlation induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling imply that lightly doped polyacenes, which approximately realize this structure, are good candidates for high temperature electron-phonon driven superconductivity.
  • We study the structure of Bogoliubov quasiparticles, 'bogolons,' the fermionic excitations of paired superfluids that arise from fermion (BCS) pairing, including neutral superfluids, superconductors, and paired quantum Hall states. The naive construction of a stationary quasiparticle in which the deformation of the pair field is neglected leads to a contradiction: it carries a net electrical current even though it does not move. However, treating the pair field self-consistently resolves this problem: In a neutral superfluid, a dipolar current pattern is associated with the quasiparticle for which the total current vanishes. When Maxwell electrodynamics is included, as appropriate to a superconductor, this pattern is confined over a penetration depth. For paired quantum Hall states of composite fermions, the Maxwell term is replaced by a Chern-Simons term, which leads to a dipolar charge distribution and consequently to a dipolar current pattern.
  • A d-wave superconducting phase with coexisting intra-unit-cell orbital current order has the remarkable property that it supports finite size Fermi pockets of Bougoliubov quasiparticles. Experimentally detectable consequences of this include a residual $T$-linear term in the specific heat in the absence of disorder and residual features in the thermal and microwave conductivity in the low disorder limit.
  • There is a close analogy between the response of a quantum Hall liquid (QHL) to a small change in the electron density and the response of a superconductor to an externally applied magnetic flux - an analogy which is made concrete in the Chern-Simons Landau-Ginzburg (CSLG) formulation of the problem. As the Types of superconductor are distinguished by this response, so too for QHLs: a typology can be introduced which is, however, richer than that in superconductors owing to the lack of any time-reversal symmetry relating positive and negative fluxes. At the boundary between Type I and Type II behavior, the CSLG action has a "Bogomol'nyi point," where the quasi-holes (vortices) are non-interacting - at the microscopic level, this corresponds to the behavior of systems governed by a set of model Hamiltonians which have been constructed to render exact a large class of QHL wavefunctions. All Types of QHLs are capable of giving rise to quantized Hall plateaux.
  • The behaviour of matter near zero temperature continuous phase transitions, or 'quantum critical points' (QCPs) is a central topic of study in condensed matter physics. In fermionic systems, fundamental questions remain unanswered: the nature of the quantum critical regime is unclear because of the apparent breakdown of the concept of the quasiparticle, a cornerstone of existing theories of strongly interacting metals. Even less is known experimentally about the formation of ordered phases from such a quantum critical 'soup'. Here, we report a study of the specific heat across the phase diagram of the model system Sr3Ru2O7, which features an anomalous phase whose transport properties are consistent with those of an electronic nematic. We show that this phase, which exists at low temperatures in a narrow range of magnetic fields, forms directly from a quantum critical state, and contains more entropy than mean-field calculations predict. Our results suggest that this extra entropy is due to remnant degrees of freedom from the highly entropic state above T_c. The associated quantum critical point, which is 'concealed' by the nematic phase, separates two Fermi liquids, neither of which has an identifiable spontaneously broken symmetry, but which likely differ in the topology of their Fermi surfaces.
  • We analyze the effect of the non-vanishing range of electron-electron repulsion on the mechanism of unconventional superconductivity. We present asymptotically exact weak-coupling results for dilute electrons in the continuum and for the 2D extended Hubbard model, as well as density-matrix renormalization group results for the two-leg extended Hubbard model at intermediate couplings, and approximate results for the case of realistically screened Coulomb interactions. We show that $T_c$ is generally suppressed in some pairing channels as longer range interactions increase in strength, but superconductivity is not destroyed. Our results confirm that electron-electron interaction can lead to unconventional superconductivity under physically realistic circumstances.
  • We construct a 2-leg ladder model of an Fe-pnictide superconductor and discuss its properties and relationship with the familiar 2-leg cuprate model. Our results suggest that the underlying pairing mechanism for the Fe-pnictide superconductors is similar to that for the cuprates.
  • The nature of the pseudogap phase of cuprate high-temperature superconductors is a major unsolved problem in condensed matter physics. We studied the commencement of the pseudogap state at temperature T* using three different techniques (angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, polar Kerr effect, and time-resolved reflectivity) on the same optimally-doped Bi2201 crystals. We observed the coincident, abrupt onset at T* of a particle-hole asymmetric antinodal gap in the electronic spectrum, a Kerr rotation in the reflected light polarization, and a change in the ultrafast relaxational dynamics, consistent with a phase transition. Upon further cooling, spectroscopic signatures of superconductivity begin to grow close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), entangled in an energy-momentum-dependent fashion with the pre-existing pseudogap features, ushering in a ground state with coexisting orders.
  • In this supporting material for the main paper (the preceding submission), we show, in addition to the related information for the experiments, additional discussion that cannot fit in the main paper (due to the space constraint). It includes further discussion about our experimental observations, wider implications of our main findings with various reported candidates for the pseudogap order, and a simple mean-field argument that favors interpretations based on a finite-Q order (density wave) for the pseudogap seen by ARPES (whether "the pseudogap order" is a single order or contains multiple ingredients, is an independent, open issue). We also include a detailed simulation section, in which we model different candidates (various density wave/nematic order) for the pseudogap order in simple forms using a mean-field approach, and discuss their partial success as well as limitations in describing the experimental observations. These simulations are based on a tight-binding model with parameters fitted globally (and reasonably well) to the experimental band dispersions (by tracking the maximum of the energy distribution curve), which could be useful for further theoretical explorations on this issue.
  • We present a well-controlled perturbative renormalization group (RG) treatment of superconductivity from short-ranged repulsive interactions in a variety of model two dimensional electronic systems. Our analysis applies in the limit where the repulsive interactions between the electrons are small compared to their kinetic energy.