• Photometric measurements are prone to systematic errors presenting a challenge to low-amplitude variability detection. In search for a general-purpose variability detection technique able to recover a broad range of variability types including currently unknown ones, we test 18 statistical characteristics quantifying scatter and/or correlation between brightness measurements. We compare their performance in identifying variable objects in seven time series data sets obtained with telescopes ranging in size from a telephoto lens to 1m-class and probing variability on time-scales from minutes to decades. The test data sets together include lightcurves of 127539 objects, among them 1251 variable stars of various types and represent a range of observing conditions often found in ground-based variability surveys. The real data are complemented by simulations. We propose a combination of two indices that together recover a broad range of variability types from photometric data characterized by a wide variety of sampling patterns, photometric accuracies, and percentages of outlier measurements. The first index is the interquartile range (IQR) of magnitude measurements, sensitive to variability irrespective of a time-scale and resistant to outliers. It can be complemented by the ratio of the lightcurve variance to the mean square successive difference, 1/h, which is efficient in detecting variability on time-scales longer than the typical time interval between observations. Variable objects have larger 1/h and/or IQR values than non-variable objects of similar brightness. Another approach to variability detection is to combine many variability indices using principal component analysis. We present 124 previously unknown variable stars found in the test data.
  • An initial investigation of two poorly studied eclipsing binaries separated by ~3' in the sky is presented. The first star (GSC 2576-01248) was discovered by the TrES exoplanet search project. The second one (GSC 2576-02071) was identified by the authors during CCD observations of GSC 2576-01248. We combine our dedicated CCD photometry with the archival TrES observations and data from the digitized photographic plates of the Moscow collection to determine periods of the two variable stars with high precision. For GSC 2576-01248, addition of historical photographic data provides a major improvement in accuracy of period determination. No evidence for period change in these binary systems was found. The lightcurve of GSC 2576-01248 is characterized by a prominent variable O'Connell effect suggesting the presence of a dark starspot and asynchronous rotation of a binary component. GSC 2576-02071 shows a shift of the secondary minimum from the phase =0.5 indicating a significant orbit eccentricity.