• Ultrafast optical spectroscopy is used to study the antiferromagnetic f-electron system USb2. We observe the opening of two charge gaps at low temperatures (<45 K), arising from renormalization of the electronic structure. Analysis of our data indicates that one gap is due to hybridization between localized f-electron and conduction electron bands, while band renormalization involving magnons leads to the emergence of the second gap. These experiments thus enable us to shed light on the complex electronic structure emerging at the Fermi surface in f-electron systems.
  • Intense, single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses offer a promising approach for understanding and controlling the properties of a material on an ultrafast time scale. In particular, resonantly exciting phonons leads to a better understanding of how they couple to other degrees of freedom in the material (e.g., ferroelectricity, conductivity and magnetism) while enabling coherent control of lattice vibrations and the symmetry changes associated with them. However, an ultrafast method for observing the resulting structural changes at the atomic scale is essential for studying phonon dynamics. A simple approach for doing this is optical second harmonic generation (SHG), a technique with remarkable sensitivity to crystalline symmetry in the bulk of a material as well as at surfaces and interfaces. This makes SHG an ideal method for probing phonon dynamics in topological insulators (TI), materials with unique surface transport properties. Here, we resonantly excite a polar phonon mode in the canonical TI Bi$_2$Se$_3$ with intense THz pulses and probe the subsequent response with SHG. This enables us to separate the photoinduced lattice dynamics at the surface from transient inversion symmetry breaking in the bulk. Furthermore, we coherently control the phonon oscillations by varying the time delay between a pair of driving THz pulses. Our work thus demonstrates a versatile, table-top tool for probing and controlling ultrafast phonon dynamics in materials, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, such as that between a TI and a magnetic material, where exotic new states of matter are predicted to exist.
  • We have studied the sub-picosecond quasiparticle dynamics in the perovskite manganite La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 and the layered manganite La1.4Sr1.6Mn2O7 using ultrafast optical spectroscopy. We found that for T > TC, initial relaxation proceeds on the time scale of several hundred femtoseconds and corresponds to the redressing of a photoexcited electron to its polaronic ground state. The temperature and dimensionality dependence of this polaron redressing time provides insight into the relationship between polaronic motion and spin dynamics on a sub-picosecond time scale. We also observe a crossover to a more conventional electron-phonon relaxation in the ferromagnetic metallic phase below Tc.
  • Strong coupling between discrete phonon and continuous electron-hole pair excitations can give rise to a pronounced asymmetry in the phonon line shape, known as the Fano resonance. This effect has been observed in a variety of systems, such as stripe-phase nickelates, graphene and high-$T_{c}$ superconductors. Here, we reveal explicit evidence for strong coupling between an infrared-active $A_1$ phonon and electronic transitions near the Weyl points (Weyl fermions) through the observation of a Fano resonance in the recently discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. The resultant asymmetry in the phonon line shape, conspicuous at low temperatures, diminishes continuously as the temperature increases. This anomalous behavior originates from the suppression of the electronic transitions near the Weyl points due to the decreasing occupation of electronic states below the Fermi level ($E_{F}$) with increasing temperature, as well as Pauli blocking caused by thermally excited electrons above $E_{F}$. Our findings not only elucidate the underlying mechanism governing the tunable Fano resonance, but also open a new route for exploring exotic physical phenomena through the properties of phonons in Weyl semimetals.
  • We investigate spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) multiferroic TbMnO3 using optical- pump, terahertz (THz)-probe spectroscopy. Photoexcitation results in a broadband THz transmission change, with an onset time of 25 ps at 6 K that becomes faster at higher temperatures. We attribute this time constant to spin-lattice thermalization. The excellent agreement between our measurements and previous ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on the same material confirms that our THz pulse directly probes spin order. We suggest that this could be the case in general for insulating AFM materials, if the origin of the static absorption in the THz spectral range is magnetic.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for directly measuring the ultrafast energy transfer between elec- trons and magnons, enabling us to track spin dynamics in an antiferromagnet (AFM). In multiferroic HoMnO3, optical photoexcitation creates hot electrons, after which changes in the spin order are probed with a THz pulse tuned to a magnon resonance. This reveals a photoinduced transparency, which builds up over several picoseconds as the spins heat up due to energy transfer from hot elec- trons via phonons. This spin-lattice thermalization time is ?10 times faster than that of typical ferromagnetic (FM) manganites. We qualitatively explain the fundamental differences in spin-lattice thermalization between FM and AFM systems and apply a Boltzmann equation model for treating AFMs. Our work gives new insight into spin-lattice thermalization in AFMs and demonstrates a new approach for directly monitoring the ultrafast dynamics of spin order in these systems.
  • We analyze the thermalization of a photoexcited charge carrier coupled to a single branch of quantum phonons within the Holstein model. To this end, we calculate the far-from-equilibrium time evolution of a pure many-body state and compare it with predictions of the thermal Gibbs ensemble. We show that at strong enough carrier excitation, the nonequilibrium system evolves towards a thermal steady state. Our analysis is based on two classes of observables. First, the occupations of fermionic momenta, which are the eigenvalues of the one-particle density matrix, match in the steady state the values in the corresponding Gibbs ensemble. This indicates thermalization of static fermionic correlations on the entire lattice. Second, the dynamic current-current correlations, including the time-resolved optical conductivity, also take the form of their thermal counterparts. Remarkably, both static and dynamic fermionic correlations thermalize with identical temperatures. Our results suggest that the subsequent relaxation processes, observed in time-resolved ultrafast spectroscopy, may be efficiently described by applying quasithermal approaches, e.g., multi-temperature models.
  • Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to track carrier dynamics in the large magnetoresistance material WTe$_{2}$. Our experiments reveal a fast relaxation process occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale that is caused by electron-phonon thermalization, allowing us to extract the electron-phonon coupling constant. An additional slower relaxation process, occurring on a time scale of $\sim$5-15 picoseconds, is attributed to phonon-assisted electron-hole recombination. As the temperature decreases from 300 K, the timescale governing this process increases due to the reduction of the phonon population. However, below $\sim$50 K, an unusual decrease of the recombination time sets in, most likely due to a change in the electronic structure that has been linked to the large magnetoresistance observed in this material.
  • A new approach to all-optical detection and control of the coupling between electric and magnetic order on ultrafast timescales is achieved using time-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) to study a ferroelectric (FE)/ferromagnet (FM) oxide heterostructure. We use femtosecond optical pulses to modify the spin alignment in a Ba$_{0.1}$Sr$_{0.9}$TiO$_{3}$(BSTO)/La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_{3}$ (LCMO) heterostructure and selectively probe the ferroelectric response using SHG. In this heterostructure, the pump pulses photoexcite non-equilibrium quasiparticles in LCMO, which rapidly interact with phonons before undergoing spin-lattice relaxation on a timescale of tens of picoseconds. This reduces the spin-spin interactions in LCMO, applying stress on BSTO through magnetostriction. This then modifies the FE polarization through the piezoelectric effect, on a timescale much faster than laser-induced heat diffusion from LCMO to BSTO. We have thus demonstrated an ultrafast indirect magnetoelectric effect in a FE/FM heterostructure mediated through elastic coupling, with a timescale primarily governed by spin-lattice relaxation in the FM layer.
  • Using ultrafast optical spectroscopy, we show that polaronic behavior associated with interfacial antiferromagnetic order is likely the origin of tunable magnetotransport upon switching the ferroelectric polarity in a La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_{3}$/BiFeO$_{3}$ (LCMO/BFO) heterostructure. This is revealed through the difference in dynamic spectral weight transfer between LCMO and LCMO/BFO at low temperatures, which indicates that transport in LCMO/BFO is polaronic in nature. This polaronic feature in LCMO/BFO decreases in relatively high magnetic fields due to the increased spin alignment, while no discernible change is found in the LCMO film at low temperatures. These results thus shed new light on the intrinsic mechanisms governing magnetoelectric coupling in this heterostructure, potentially offering a new route to enhancing multiferroic functionality.
  • An emerging area in condensed matter physics is the use of multilayered heterostructures to enhance ferroelectricity in complex oxides. Here, we demonstrate that optically pumping carriers across the interface between thin films of a ferroelectric (FE) insulator and a ferromagnetic metal can significantly enhance the FE polarization. The photoinduced FE state remains stable at low temperatures for over one day. This occurs through screening of the internal electric field by the photoexcited carriers, leading to a larger, more stable polarization state that may be suitable for applications in areas such as data and energy storage.
  • Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials possess spontaneous electric and magnetic order, respectively, which can be switched by the corresponding applied electric and magnetic fields. Multiferroics combine these properties in a single material, providing an avenue for controlling electric polarization with a magnetic field and magnetism with an electric field. These materials have been intensively studied in recent years, both for their fundamental scientific interest as well as their potential applications in a broad range of magnetoelectric devices [1, 2, 3, 4]. However, the microscopic origins of magnetism and ferroelectricity are quite different, and the mechanisms producing strong coupling between them are not always well understood. Hence, gaining a deeper understanding of magnetoelectric coupling in these materials is the key to their rational design. Here, we use ultrafast optical spectroscopy to show that quantum charge fluctuations can govern the interplay between electric polarization and magnetic ordering in the charge-ordered multiferroic LuFe2O4.
  • Ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy is used to reveal the coexistence of coupled antiferromagnetic/ferroelectric and ferromagnetic orders in multiferroic TbMnO3 films through their time domain signatures. Our observations are explained by a theoretical model describing the coupling between reservoirs with different magnetic properties. These results can guide researchers in creating new kinds of multiferroic materials that combine coupled ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties in one compound.
  • We apply a rigorous eigenmode analysis to study the electromagnetic properties of linear and weakly nonlinear metamaterials. The nonlinear response can be totally described by the linear eigenmodes when weak nonlinearities are attributed to metamaterials. We use this theory to interpret intrinsic second-harmonic spectroscopy on metallic metamaterials. Our study indicates that metamaterial eigenmodes play a critical role in optimizing a nonlinear metamaterial response to the extent that a poorly optimized modal pattern overwhelms the widely recognized benefits of plasmonic resonant field enhancements.
  • We report a comprehensive study of ultrafast carrier dynamics in single crystals of multiferroic BiFeO$_{3}$. Using femtosecond optical pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the photoexcited electrons relax to the conduction band minimum through electron-phonon coupling with a $\sim$1 picosecond time constant that does not significantly change across the antiferromagnetic transition. Photoexcited electrons subsequently leave the conduction band and primarily decay via radiative recombination, which is supported by photoluminescence measurements. We find that despite the coexisting ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic orders in BiFeO$_{3}$, the intrinsic nature of this charge-transfer insulator results in carrier relaxation similar to that observed in bulk semiconductors.
  • Numerous phenomenological parallels have been drawn between f- and d- electron systems in an attempt to understand their display of unconventional superconductivity. The microscopics of how electrons evolve from participation in large moment antiferromagnetism to superconductivity in these systems, however, remains a mystery. Knowing the origin of Cooper paired electrons in momentum space is a crucial prerequisite for understanding the pairing mechanism. Of especial interest are pressure-induced superconductors CeIn3 and CeRhIn5 in which disparate magnetic and superconducting orders apparently coexist - arising from within the same f-electron degrees of freedom. Here we present ambient pressure quantum oscillation measurements on CeIn3 that crucially identify the electronic structure - potentially similar to high temperature superconductors. Heavy pockets of f-character are revealed in CeIn3, undergoing an unexpected effective mass divergence well before the antiferromagnetic critical field. We thus uncover the softening of a branch of quasiparticle excitations located away from the traditional spin-fluctuation dominated antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. The observed Fermi surface of dispersive f-electrons in CeIn3 could potentially explain the emergence of Cooper pairs from within a strong moment antiferromagnet.
  • We report a study of magnetic dynamics in multiferroic hexagonal manganite HoMnO3 by far-infrared spectroscopy. Low-temperature magnetic excitation spectrum of HoMnO3 consists of magnetic-dipole transitions of Ho ions within the crystal-field split J=8 manifold and of the triangular antiferromagnetic resonance of Mn ions. We determine the effective spin Hamiltonian for the Ho ion ground state. The magnetic-field splitting of the Mn antiferromagnetic resonance allows us to measure the magnetic exchange coupling between the rare-earth and Mn ions.
  • We report the detection of a magnetic resonance mode in multiferroic Ba0.6Sr1.4Zn2Fe12O22 using time domain pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy. Magnetic sublattice precession is coherently excited via picosecond thermal modification of the exchange energy. Importantly, this precession is recorded as a change in reflectance caused by the dynamic magnetoelectric effect. Thus, transient reflectance provides a sensitive probe of magnetization dynamics in materials with strong magnetoelectric coupling, such as multiferroics, revealing new possibilities for application in spintronics and ultrafast manipulation of magnetic moments.
  • A decrease in the rotational period observed in torsional oscillator measurements was recently taken as a possible indication of a supersolid state of helium. We reexamine this interpretation and note that the decrease in the rotation period is also consistent with a solidification of a small liquid-like component into a low-temperature glass. Such a solidification may occur by a low-temperature quench of topological defects (e.g., grain boundaries or dislocations) which we examined in an earlier work. The low-temperature glass can account for not only a monotonic decrease in the rotation period as the temperature is lowered but also explains the peak in the dissipation occurring near the transition point. Unlike the non-classical rotational inertia scenario, which depends on the supersolid fraction, the dependence of the rotational period on external parameters, e.g., the oscillator velocity, provides an alternate interpretation of the oscillator experiments. Future experiments might explore this effect.
  • We performed an extensive numerical analysis of the Holstein model. Combining variational Lanczos diagonalisation, density matrix renormalisation group, kernel polynomial expansion, and cluster perturbation theory techniques we solved for properties of the Holstein polaron and bipolaron problems. Numerical solution of the Holstein model means that we determined the ground-state and low-lying excited states with arbitrary precision in the thermodynamic limit for any dimension. Moreover, we calculated the spectral properties (e.g. photoemission and phonon spectra), optical response and thermal transport, as well as the dynamics of polaron formation. Our approach takes into account the full quantum dynamics of the electrons and phonons and yields unbiased results for all electron-phonon interaction strengths and phonon frequencies, but is of particular value in the intermediate-coupling regime, where perturbation theories and other analytical techniques fail.
  • The ground states of Klein type spin models on the pyrochlore and checkerboard lattice are spanned by the set of singlet dimer coverings, and thus possess an extensive ground--state degeneracy. Among the many exotic consequences is the presence of deconfined fractional excitations (spinons) which propagate through the entire system. While a realistic electronic model on the pyrochlore lattice is close to the Klein point, this point is in fact inherently unstable because any perturbation $\epsilon$ restores spinon confinement at $T = 0$. We demonstrate that deconfinement is recovered in the finite--temperature region $\epsilon \ll T \ll J$, where the deconfined phase can be characterized as a dilute Coulomb gas of thermally excited spinons. We investigate the zero--temperature phase diagram away from the Klein point by means of a variational approach based on the singlet dimer coverings of the pyrochlore lattices and taking into account their non--orthogonality. We find that in these systems, nearest neighbor exchange interactions do not lead to Rokhsar-Kivelson type processes.
  • Solid He4 is viewed as a nearly perfect Debye solid. Yet, recent calorimetry indicates that its low-temperature specific heat has both cubic and linear contributions. These features appear in the same temperature range ($T \sim 200$ mK) where measurements of the torsional oscillator period suggest a supersolid transition. We analyze the specific heat to compare the measured with the estimated entropy for a proposed supersolid transition with 1% superfluid fraction. We find that the experimental entropy is substantially less than the calculated entropy. We suggest that the low-temperature linear term in the specific heat is due to a glassy state that develops at low temperatures and is caused by a distribution of tunneling systems in the crystal. It is proposed that small scale dislocation loops produce those tunneling systems. We argue that the reported mass decoupling is consistent with an increase in the oscillator frequency as expected for a glass-like transition.
  • We introduce a frustrated spin 1/2 Hamiltonian which is an extension of the two dimensional $J_1 - J_2$ Heisenberg model. The ground states of this model are exactly obtained at a first order quantum phase transition between two regions with different valence bond solid order parameters. At this point, the low energy excitations are deconfined spinons and spin-charge separation occurs under doping in the limit of low concentration of holes. In addition, this point is characterized by the proliferation of topological defects that signal the emergence of $Z_2$ gauge symmetry.
  • We present a detailed theoretical study of the ultrafast quasiparticle relaxation dynamics observed in normal metals and heavy fermion materials with femtosecond time-resolved optical pump-probe spectroscopy. For normal metals, a nonthermal electron distribution gives rise to a temperature (T) independent electron-phonon relaxation time at low temperatures, in contrast to the T^{-3}-divergent behavior predicted by the two-temperature model. For heavy fermion compounds, we find that the blocking of electron-phonon scattering for heavy electrons within the density-of-states peak near the Fermi energy is crucial to explain the rapid increase of the electron-phonon relaxation time below the Kondo temperature. We propose the hypothesis that the slower Fermi velocity compared to the sound velocity provides a natural blocking mechanism due to energy and momentum conservation laws.
  • The formation of a polaron quasiparticle from a bare electron is studied in the framework of the Holstein model of electron-phonon coupling. Using Schr\"{o}dinger's formalism, we calculate the time evolution of the distribution of the electron and phonon density, lattice deformation, and the electron-phonon (el-ph) correlation functions in real space. The quantum dynamical nature of the phonons is preserved. The polaron formation time is related to the dephasing time of the continuum of unbound phonon excited states in the spectral function, which depends on the phonon frequency and the el-ph coupling strength. As the el-ph coupling increases, qualitative changes in polaron formation occur when the one-phonon polaron bound state forms. In the adiabatic regime, we find that a potential barrier between the quasi-free and heavy polaron states exists in both 2D and 3D, which is crucial for polaron formation dynamics. We compare to recent experiments.