• The Living Earth Simulator (LES) is one of the core components of the FuturICT architecture. It will work as a federation of methods, tools, techniques and facilities supporting all of the FuturICT simulation-related activities to allow and encourage interactive exploration and understanding of societal issues. Society-relevant problems will be targeted by leaning on approaches based on complex systems theories and data science in tight interaction with the other components of FuturICT. The LES will evaluate and provide answers to real-world questions by taking into account multiple scenarios. It will build on present approaches such as agent-based simulation and modeling, multiscale modelling, statistical inference, and data mining, moving beyond disciplinary borders to achieve a new perspective on complex social systems.
  • This white paper briefly describes the astrophysics of ultra-compact binaries, with emphasis of the challenges and opportunities in the next decade.
  • In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo]<-1.3 subsample is nearly independent of Galactic cylindrical coordinates R and z, while it decreases with z for the high-metallicity [Z/Zo]> -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the ~10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.
  • We describe the design, construction and performance of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector (RICH) constructed to identify charged particles in the CLEO experiment. Cherenkov radiation occurs in LiF crystals, both planar and ones with a novel ``sawtooth''-shaped exit surface. Photons in the wavelength interval 135--165 nm are detected using multi-wire chambers filled with a mixture of methane gas and triethylamine vapor. Excellent pion/kaon separation is demonstrated.
  • We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72 h^{-3} Gpc^3 over 3816 square degrees and 0.16<z<0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h^{-1} Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z=1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z=0.35 and z=1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z=0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density Omega_mh^2 to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find Omega_m = 0.273 +- 0.025 + 0.123 (1+w_0) + 0.137 Omega_K. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is Omega_K=-0.010+-0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties.
  • We combine the constraints from the recent Ly-alpha forest and bias analysis of the SDSS with previous constraints from SDSS galaxy clustering, the latest supernovae, and WMAP . Combining WMAP and the lya we find for the primordial slope n_s=0.98\pm 0.02. We see no evidence of running, dn/d\ln k=-0.003\pm 0.010, a factor of 3 improvement over previous constraints. We also find no evidence of tensors, r<0.36 (95% c.l.). A positive correlation between tensors and primordial slope disfavors chaotic inflation type models with steep slopes: V \propto \phi^4 is outside the 3-sigma contour. For the amplitude we find sigma_8=0.90\pm 0.03 from the lyaf and WMAP alone. We find no evidence of neutrino mass: for the case of 3 massive neutrino families with an inflationary prior, \sum m_{\nu}<0.42eV and the mass of lightest neutrino is m_1<0.13eV at 95% c.l. For the 3 massless + 1 massive neutrino case we find m_{\nu}<0.79eV for the massive neutrino, excluding at 95% c.l. all neutrino mass solutions compatible with the LSND results. We explore dark energy constraints in models with a fairly general time dependence of dark energy equation of state, finding Omega_lambda=0.72\pm 0.02, w(z=0.3)=-0.98^{+0.10}_{-0.12}, the latter changing to w(z=0.3)=-0.92^{+0.09}_{-0.10} if tensors are allowed. We find no evidence for variation of the equation of state with redshift, w(z=1)=-1.03^{+0.21}_{-0.28}. These results rely on the current understanding of the lyaf and other probes, which need to be explored further both observationally and theoretically, but extensive tests reveal no evidence of inconsistency among different data sets used here.
  • We analyze the properties of quasar variability using repeated SDSS imaging data in five UV-to-far red photometric bands, accurate to 0.02 mag, for 13,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The observed time lags span the range from 3 hours to over 3 years, and constrain the quasar variability for rest-frame time lags of up to two years, and at rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 Ang. to 6000 Ang. We demonstrate that 66,000 SDSS measurements of magnitude differences can be described within the measurement noise by a simple function of only three free parameters. The addition of POSS data constrains the long-term behavior of quasar variability and provides evidence for a turn-over in the structure function. This turn-over indicates that the characteristic time scale for optical variability of quasars is of the order 1 year.
  • We summarize the detection rates at wavelengths other than optical for \~99,000 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 1 ``main'' spectroscopic sample. The analysis is based on positional cross-correlation with source catalogs from ROSAT, 2MASS, IRAS, GB6, FIRST, NVSS and WENSS surveys. We find that the rest-frame UV-IR broad-band galaxy SEDs form a remarkably uniform, nearly one parameter, family. As an example, the SDSS u and r band data, supplemented with redshift, can be used to predict K band magnitudes measured by 2MASS with an rms scatter of only 0.2 mag; when measurement uncertainties are taken into account, the astrophysical scatter appears not larger than ~0.1 mag.
  • The potential of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for wide-field variability studies is illustrated using multi-epoch observations for 3,000,000 point sources observed in 700 deg2 of sky, with time spans ranging from 3 hours to 3 years. These repeated observations of the same sources demonstrate that SDSS delivers ~0.02 mag photometry with well behaved and understood errors. We show that quasars dominate optically faint (r > 18) point sources that are variable on time scales longer than a few months, while for shorter time scales, and at bright magnitudes, most variable sources are stars.
  • Using the combined CLEO II and CLEO II.V data sets of 9.1 fb^{-1} at the Upsilon(4S), we measure properties of Psi mesons produced directly from decays of the B meson, where ``B'' denotes an admixture of B+, B-, B0, and B0bar, and ``Psi'' denotes either J/Psi or Psi(2S). We report first measurements of Psi polarization in B -> Psi(direct) X: alpha(J/Psi) = -0.30 {+0.07 -0.06 stat} {+-0.04 syst} and alpha(Psi(2S)) = -0.45 {+0.22 -0.19 stat} {+-0.04 syst}. We also report improved measurements of the momentum distributions of Psi produced directly from B decays, correcting for measurement smearing. Finally, we report measurements of the inclusive branching fraction for B -> Psi X and B -> Chi_c1 X.
  • We have searched a sample of 9.6 million BBbar events for the flavor-changing neutral current decays B -> K l^+ l^- and B -> K^*(892) l^+ l^-. We subject the latter decay to the requirement that the dilepton mass exceed 0.5 GeV. There is no indication of a signal. We obtain the 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions Br(B -> K l^+ l^-) < 1.7 \times 10^{-6} and Br(B -> K^*(892) l^+ l^-) < 3.3 \times 10^{-6}. We also obtain an upper limit on the weighted average 0.65 Br(B -> K l^+ l^-) + 0.35 Br(B -> K^*(892) l^+ l^-) < 1.5 \times 10^{-6}. The weighted-average limit is only 50% above the Standard Model prediction.
  • We report the first observation of exclusive decays of the type B to D^* N anti-N X, where N is a nucleon. Using a sample of 9.7 times 10^{6} B-Bbar pairs collected with the CLEO detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we measure the branching fractions B(B^0 \to D^{*-} proton antiproton \pi^+) = ({6.5}^{+1.3}_{-1.2} +- 1.0) \times 10^{-4} and B(B^0 \to D^{*-} proton antineutron) = ({14.5}^{+3.4}_{-3.0} +- 2.7) times 10^{-4}. Antineutrons are identified by their annihilation in the CsI electromagnetic calorimeter.
  • The CLEO detector has been upgraded to include a state of the art particle identification system, based on the Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector (RICH) technology, in order to take data at the upgraded CESR electron positron collider. The expected performance is reviewed, as well as the preliminary results from an engineering run during the first few months of operation of the CLEO III detector.
  • The CLEO III Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector uses LiF radiators to generate Cherenkov photons which are then detected by proportional wire chambers using a mixture of CH$_4$ and TEA gases. The first two photon detector modules which were constructed, were taken to Fermilab and tested in a beam dump that provided high momentum muons. We report on results using both plane and "sawtooth" shaped radiators. Specifically, we discuss the number of photoelectrons observed per ring and the angular resolution. The particle separation ability is shown to be sufficient for the physics of CLEO III.
  • We report on a study of the invariant mass spectrum of the hadronic system in the decay tau- -> pi- pi0 nu_tau. This study was performed with data obtained with the CLEO II detector operating at the CESR e+ e- collider. We present fits to phenomenological models in which resonance parameters associated with the rho(770) and rho(1450) mesons are determined. The pi- pi0 spectral function inferred from the invariant mass spectrum is compared with data on e+ e- -> pi+ pi- as a test of the Conserved Vector Current theorem. We also discuss the implications of our data with regard to estimates of the hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment.
  • Using 4.7 fb^-1 of data taken at CESR at energies at and near the Upsilon(4S) we have studied the decay B- -> D{*+}pi-pi- (and its conjugate). We observe a new, broad charmed meson state, which we interpret as D_J(j=1/2), in its decay to D{*+}pi-. Our preliminary results indicate the mass and width of this L=1 state to be m = (2461 +41/-3} +/-10 +/-32) MeV and Gamma = (290 +101/-79 +/-26 +/-36) MeV, with the third uncertainty associated with the parameterization of the relative strong phases. In addition we have measured several new branching fractions of charged B mesons. All quoted results are preliminary.
  • The CLEO-III Detector upgrade for charged particle identification is discussed. The RICH design uses solid LiF crystal radiators coupled with multi-wire chamber photon detectors, using TEA as the photosensor, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results from our beam test at Fermilab are presented.
  • Using the CLEO II detector we have performed the first search for $CP$ violation in tau lepton decay. CP violation in lepton decay does not occur in the minimal standard model but can occur in extensions such as the multi-Higgs doublet model. It appears as a characteristic difference between the $\tau^+$ and $\tau^-$ decay angular distributions for the semi-leptonic decay modes such as $\tau^- \to K^0 \pi^- \nu$. We define an observable asymmetry to exploit this and find no evidence for any CP violation.
  • Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell $e^+e^-$ storage ring, CESR, we study the two-photon production of $\Lambda \bar{\Lambda}$, making the first observation of $\gamma \gamma \to \Lambda \bar{\Lambda}$. We present the cross-section for $ \gamma \gamma \to \Lambda \bar{\Lambda}$ as a function of the $\gamma \gamma$ center of mass energy and compare it to that predicted by the quark-diquark model.