• We report the discovery of OGLE-2016-BLG-1190Lb, which is likely to be the first Spitzer microlensing planet in the Galactic bulge/bar, an assignation that can be confirmed by two epochs of high-resolution imaging of the combined source-lens baseline object. The planet's mass M_p= 13.4+-0.9 M_J places it right at the deuterium burning limit, i.e., the conventional boundary between "planets" and "brown dwarfs". Its existence raises the question of whether such objects are really "planets" (formed within the disks of their hosts) or "failed stars" (low mass objects formed by gas fragmentation). This question may ultimately be addressed by comparing disk and bulge/bar planets, which is a goal of the Spitzer microlens program. The host is a G dwarf M_host = 0.89+-0.07 M_sun and the planet has a semi-major axis a~2.0 AU. We use Kepler K2 Campaign 9 microlensing data to break the lens-mass degeneracy that generically impacts parallax solutions from Earth-Spitzer observations alone, which is the first successful application of this approach. The microlensing data, derived primarily from near-continuous, ultra-dense survey observations from OGLE, MOA, and three KMTNet telescopes, contain more orbital information than for any previous microlensing planet, but not quite enough to accurately specify the full orbit. However, these data do permit the first rigorous test of microlensing orbital-motion measurements, which are typically derived from data taken over <1% of an orbital period.
  • We present the analysis of OGLE-2016-BLG-0613, for which the lensing light curve appears to be that of a typical binary-lens event with two caustic spikes but with a discontinuous feature on the trough between the spikes. We find that the discontinuous feature was produced by a planetary companion to the binary lens. We find 4 degenerate triple-lens solution classes, each composed of a pair of solutions according to the well-known wide/close planetary degeneracy. One of these solution classes is excluded due to its relatively poor fit. For the remaining three pairs of solutions, the most-likely primary mass is about $M_1\sim 0.7\,M_\odot$ while the planet is a super-Jupiter. In all cases the system lies in the Galactic disk, about half-way toward the Galactic bulge. However, in one of these three solution classes, the secondary of the binary system is a low-mass brown dwarf, with relative mass ratios (1 : 0.03 : 0.003), while in the two others the masses of the binary components are comparable. These two possibilities can be distinguished in about 2024 when the measured lens-source relative proper motion will permit separate resolution of the lens and source.
  • The most powerful tests of stellar models come from the brightest stars in the sky, for which complementary techniques, such as astrometry, asteroseismology, spectroscopy, and interferometry can be combined. The K2 Mission is providing a unique opportunity to obtain high-precision photometric time series for bright stars along the ecliptic. However, bright targets require a large number of pixels to capture the entirety of the stellar flux, and bandwidth restrictions limit the number and brightness of stars that can be observed. To overcome this, we have developed a new photometric technique, that we call halo photometry, to observe very bright stars using a limited number of pixels. Halo photometry is simple, fast and does not require extensive pixel allocation, and will allow us to use K2 and other photometric missions, such as TESS, to observe very bright stars for asteroseismology and to search for transiting exoplanets. We apply this method to the seven brightest stars in the Pleiades open cluster. Each star exhibits variability; six of the stars show what are most-likely slowly pulsating B-star (SPB) pulsations, with amplitudes ranging from 20 to 2000 ppm. For the star Maia, we demonstrate the utility of combining K2 photometry with spectroscopy and interferometry to show that it is not a 'Maia variable', and to establish that its variability is caused by rotational modulation of a large chemical spot on a 10 d time scale.
  • We present results from high-resolution, optical to near-IR imaging of host stars of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), identified in the original Kepler field. Part of the data were obtained under the Kepler imaging follow-up observation program over seven years (2009 - 2015). Almost 90% of stars that are hosts to planet candidates or confirmed planets were observed. We combine measurements of companions to KOI host stars from different bands to create a comprehensive catalog of projected separations, position angles, and magnitude differences for all detected companion stars (some of which may not be bound). Our compilation includes 2297 companions around 1903 primary stars. From high-resolution imaging, we find that ~10% (~30%) of the observed stars have at least one companion detected within 1" (4"). The true fraction of systems with close (< ~4") companions is larger than the observed one due to the limited sensitivities of the imaging data. We derive correction factors for planet radii caused by the dilution of the transit depth: assuming that planets orbit the primary stars or the brightest companion stars, the average correction factors are 1.06 and 3.09, respectively. The true effect of transit dilution lies in between these two cases and varies with each system. Applying these factors to planet radii decreases the number of KOI planets with radii smaller than 2 R_Earth by ~2-23% and thus affects planet occurrence rates. This effect will also be important for the yield of small planets from future transit missions such as TESS.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-67b, a hot-Saturn transiting a rapidly rotating F-subgiant. HAT-P-67b has a radius of Rp = 2.085 -0.071/+0.096 RJ,, orbiting a M* = 1.642 -0.072/+0.155 Msun, R* = 2.546 -0.084/+0.099 Rsun host star in a ~4.81-day period orbit. We place an upper limit on the mass of the planet via radial velocity measurements to be Mp < 0.59 MJ, and lower limit of > 0.056 MJ by limitations on Roche lobe overflow. Despite being a subgiant, the host star still exhibits relatively rapid rotation, with a projected rotational velocity of v sin I* = 35.8 +/- 1.1 km/s, making it difficult to precisely determine the mass of the planet using radial velocities. We validated HAT-P-67b via two Doppler tomographic detections of the planetary transit, which eliminated potential eclipsing binary blend scenarios. The Doppler tomographic observations also confirmed that HAT-P-67b has an orbit that is aligned to within 12 degrees, in projection, with the spin of its host star. HAT-P-67b receives strong UV irradiation, and is amongst the one of the lowest density planets known, making it a good candidate for future UV transit observations to search for an extended hydrogen exosphere.
  • We present 16 new, and confirm 7 previously identified, DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field through ground-based spectroscopy with the Hale 200", Kitt Peak 4-meter, and Bok 2.3-meter telescopes. Using atmospheric models we determine their effective temperatures and surface gravities to constrain their position with respect to the ZZ Ceti (DA pulsator) instability strip, and look for the presence or absence of pulsation with Kepler's unprecedented photometry. Our results are as follows: i) From our measurements of temperature and surface gravity, 12 of the 23 DA white dwarfs from this work fall well outside of the instability strip. The Kepler photometry available for 11 of these WDs allows us to confirm that none are pulsating. One of these eleven happens to be a presumed binary, KIC 11604781, with a period of ~5 days. ii) The remaining 11 DA white dwarfs are instability strip candidates, potentially falling within the current, empirical instability strip, after accounting for uncertainties. These WDs will help constrain the strip's location further, as eight are near the blue edge and three are near the red edge of the instability strip. Four of these WDs do not have Kepler photometry, so ground-based photometry is needed to determine the pulsation nature of these white dwarfs. The remaining seven have Kepler photometry available, but do not show any periodicity on typical WD pulsation timescales.
  • Optical microlensing surveys are restricted from detecting events near the Galactic plane and center, where the event rate is thought to be the highest, due to the high optical extinction of these fields. In the near-infrared (NIR), however, the lower extinction leads to a corresponding increase in event detections and is a primary driver for the wavelength coverage of the $WFIRST$ microlensing survey. During the 2015 and 2016 bulge observing seasons we conducted NIR microlensing surveys with UKIRT in conjunction with and in support of the $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ microlensing campaigns. Here we report on five highly extinguished ($A_H=0.81-1.97$), low-Galactic latitude ($-0.98\le b\le -0.36$) microlensing events discovered from our 2016 survey. Four of them were monitored with an hourly cadence by optical surveys but were not reported as discoveries, likely due to the high extinction. Our UKIRT surveys and suggested future NIR surveys enable the first measurement of the microlensing event rate in the NIR. This wavelength regime overlaps with the bandpass of the filter in which the $WFIRST$ microlensing survey will conduct its highest-cadence observations, making this event rate derivation critically important for optimizing its yield.
  • Calen B. Henderson, Radosław Poleski, Matthew Penny, Rachel A. Street, David P. Bennett, David W. Hogg, B. Scott Gaudi, W. Zhu, T. Barclay, G. Barentsen, S. B. Howell, F. Mullally, A. Udalski, M. K. Szymański, J. Skowron, P. Mróz, S. Kozłowski, Ł. Wyrzykowski, P. Pietrukowicz, I. Soszyński, K. Ulaczyk, M. Pawlak, T. Sumi, F. Abe, Y. Asakura, R. K. Barry, A. Bhattacharya, I. A. Bond, M. Donachie, M. Freeman, A. Fukui, Y. Hirao, Y. Itow, N. Koshimoto, M. C. A. Li, C. H. Ling, K. Masuda, Y. Matsubara, Y. Muraki, M. Nagakane, K. Ohnishi, H. Oyokawa, N. Rattenbury, To. Saito, A. Sharan, D. J. Sullivan, P. J. Tristram, A. Yonehara, E. Bachelet, D. M. Bramich, A. Cassan, M. Dominik, R. Figuera Jaimes, K. Horne, M. Hundertmark, S. Mao, C. Ranc, R. Schmidt, C. Snodgrass, I. A. Steele, Y. Tsapras, J. Wambsganss, V. Bozza, M. J. Burgdorf, U. G. Jørgensen, S. Calchi Novati, S. Ciceri, G. D'Ago, D. F. Evans, F. V. Hessman, T. C. Hinse, T.-O. Husser, L. Mancini, A. Popovas, M. Rabus, S. Rahvar, G. Scarpetta, J. Skottfelt, J. Southworth, E. Unda-Sanzana, S. T. Bryson, D. A. Caldwell, M. R. Haas, K. Larson, K. McCalmont, M. Packard, C. Peterson, D. Putnam, L. Reedy, S. Ross, J. E. Van Cleve, R. Akeson, V. Batista, J.-P. Beaulieu, C. A. Beichman, G. Bryden, D. Ciardi, A. Cole, C. Coutures, D. Foreman-Mackey, P. Fouqué, M. Friedmann, C. Gelino, S. Kaspi, E. Kerins, H. Korhonen, D. Lang, C.-H. Lee, C. H. Lineweaver, D. Maoz, J.-B. Marquette, F. Mogavero, J. C. Morales, D. Nataf, R. W. Pogge, A. Santerne, Y. Shvartzvald, D. Suzuki, M. Tamura, P. Tisserand, D. Wang
    March 7, 2016 astro-ph.EP
    $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.7 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$127 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
  • As the closest open cluster to the Sun, the Hyades is an important benchmark for many stellar properties, but its members are also scattered widely over the sky. Previous studies of stellar rotation in the Hyades relied on targeted observations of single stars or data from shallower all-sky variability surveys. The re-purposed Kepler mission, K2, is the first opportunity to measure rotation periods ($P_{rot}$) for many Hyads simultaneously while also being sensitive to fully convective M dwarf members. We analyze K2 data for 65 Hyads and present $P_{rot}$ values for 48. Thirty-seven of these are new measurements, including the first $P_{rot}$ measurements for fully convective Hyads. For nine of the 11 stars with $P_{rot}$ in the literature and this work, the measurements are consistent; we attribute the two discrepant cases to spot evolution. Nearly all stars with masses $\le0.3M_\odot$ are rapidly rotating, indicating a change in rotation properties at the boundary to full convection. When confirmed and candidate binaries are removed from the mass-period plane, only three rapid rotators with masses $\ge0.3M_\odot$ remain. This is in contrast to previous results showing that the single-valued mass-period sequence for $\approx$600 Myr-old stars ends at $\approx0.65M_\odot$ when binaries are included. We also find that models of rotational evolution predict faster rotation than is actually observed at $\approx$600 Myrs for stars $\le0.9M_\odot$. The dearth of single rapid rotators more massive than $\approx0.3M_\odot$ indicates that magnetic braking is more efficient than previously thought, and that age-rotation studies must account for multiplicity.
  • Over the duration of the Kepler mission, KIC8462852 was observed to undergo irregularly shaped, aperiodic dips in flux of up to $\sim 20$\%. The dipping activity can last for between 5 and 80 days. We characterize the object with high-resolution spectroscopy, spectral energy distribution fitting, radial velocity measurements, high-resolution imaging, and Fourier analyses of the Kepler light curve. We determine that KIC8462852 is a typical main-sequence F3 V star that exhibits no significant IR excess, and has no very close interacting companions. In this paper, we describe various scenarios to explain the dipping events observed in the Kepler light curve. We confirm that the dipping signals in the data are not caused by any instrumental or data processing artifact, and thus are astrophysical in origin. We construct scenario-independent constraints on the size and location of a body in the system that is needed to reproduce the observations. We deliberate over several assorted stellar and circumstellar astrophysical scenarios, most of which have problems explaining the data in hand. By considering the observational constraints on dust clumps in orbit around a normal main-sequence star, we conclude that the scenario most consistent with the data in hand is the passage of a family of exocomet or planetesimal fragments, all of which are associated with a single previous break-up event, possibly caused by tidal disruption or thermal processing. The minimum total mass associated with these fragments likely exceeds $10^{-6}$~\mearth, corresponding to an original rocky body of $>100$~km in diameter. We discuss the necessity of future observations to help interpret the system.
  • We present the first detections by the NASA K2 Mission of oscillations in solar-type stars, using short-cadence data collected during K2 Campaign\,1 (C1). We understand the asteroseismic detection thresholds for C1-like levels of photometric performance, and we can detect oscillations in subgiants having dominant oscillation frequencies around $1000\,\rm \mu Hz$. Changes to the operation of the fine-guidance sensors are expected to give significant improvements in the high-frequency performance from C3 onwards. A reduction in the excess high-frequency noise by a factor of two-and-a-half in amplitude would bring main-sequence stars with dominant oscillation frequencies as high as ${\simeq 2500}\,\rm \mu Hz$ into play as potential asteroseismic targets for K2.
  • We present Spitzer 4.5\micron\ light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO~8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by \citet{vaneyken12} and \citet{barnes13} predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of $300 - 600$ days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events ($>3$ years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the $M_\star = 0.34\ M_\odot$ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO~8-8695b.
  • We present the detection of five planets -- Kepler-62b, c, d, e, and f -- of size 1.31, 0.54, 1.95, 1.61 and 1.41 Earth radii, orbiting a K2V star at periods of 5.7, 12.4, 18.2, 122.4 and 267.3 days, respectively. The outermost planets (Kepler-62e & -62f) are super-Earth-size (1.25 < planet radius/earth radius < 2.0) planets in the habitable zone (HZ) of their host star, receiving 1.2 +- 0.2 and 0.41 +- 0.05 times the solar flux at Earth's orbit. Theoretical models of Kepler-62e and -62f for a stellar age of ~7 Gyr suggest that both planets could be solid: either with a rocky composition or composed of mostly solid water in their bulk.
  • We present near infra-red light curves of supernova (SN) 2011fe in M101, including 34 epochs in H band starting fourteen days before maximum brightness in the B-band. The light curve data were obtained with the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC). When the data are calibrated using templates of other Type Ia SNe, we derive an apparent H-band magnitude at the epoch of B-band maximum of 10.85 \pm 0.04. This implies a distance modulus for M101 that ranges from 28.86 to 29.17 mag, depending on which absolute calibration for Type Ia SNe is used.
  • We present Herschel Space Observatory photometric observations of the unique, long-period eclipsing binary star Epsilon Aurigae. Its extended spectral energy distribution is consistent with our previously published cool (550 K) dust disk model. We also present an archival infrared spectral energy distribution of the side of the disk facing the bright F-type star in the binary, which is consistent with a warmer (1150 K) disk model. The lack of strong molecular emission features in the Herschel bands suggests that the disk has a low gas-to-dust ratio. The spectral energy distribution and Herschel images imply that the 250 GHz radio detection reported by Altenhoff et al. is likely contaminated by infrared-bright, extended background emission associated with a nearby nebular region and should be considered an upper limit to the true flux density of Epsilon Aur.
  • The Kepler Observatory offers unprecedented photometric precision (<1 mmag) and cadence for monitoring the central stars of planetary nebulae, allowing the detection of tiny periodic light curve variations, a possible signature of binarity. With this precision free from the observational gaps dictated by weather and lunar cycles, we are able to detect companions at much larger separations and with much smaller radii than ever before. We have been awarded observing time to obtain light-curves of the central stars of the six confirmed and possible planetary nebulae in the Kepler field, including the newly discovered object Kn 61, at cadences of both 30 min and 1 min. Of these six objects, we could confirm for three a periodic variability consistent with binarity. Two others are variables, but the initial data set presents only weak periodicities. For the central star of Kn 61, Kepler data will be available in the near future.
  • During the past 20 years, the idea that non-spherical planetary nebulae (PN) may need a binary or planetary interaction to be shaped was discussed by various authors. It is now generally agreed that the varied morphologies of PN cannot be fully explained solely by single star evolution. Observationally, more binary central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) have been discovered, opening new possibilities to understand the connections between binarity and morphology. So far, \simeq 45 binary CSPN have been detected, most being close systems detected via flux variability. To determine the PN binary fraction, one needs a method to detect wider binaries. We present here recent results obtained with the various techniques described, concentrating on binary infrared excess observations aimed at detecting binaries of any separation.
  • We present time dependent modeling based on the accretion disk limit cycle model for a 270 d light curve of the short period SU UMa-type dwarf nova V344 Lyr taken by Kepler. The unprecedented precision and cadence (1 minute) far surpass that generally available for long term light curves. The data encompass two superoutbursts and 17 normal (i.e., short) outbursts. The main decay of the superoutbursts is nearly perfectly exponential, decaying at a rate ~12 d/mag, while the much more rapid decays of the normal outbursts exhibit a faster-than-exponential shape. Our modeling using the basic accretion disk limit cycle can produce the main features of the V344 Lyr light curve, including the peak outburst brightness. Nevertheless there are obvious deficiencies in our model light curves: (1) The rise times we calculate, both for the normal and superoutbursts, are too fast. (2) The superoutbursts are too short. (3) The shoulders on the rise to superoutburst have more structure than the shoulder in the observed superoutburst and are too slow, comprising about a third to half of the total viscous plateau, rather than the ~10% observed. However, one of the alpha_{cold} -> alpha_{hot} interpolation schemes we investigate (one that is physically motivated) does yield longer superoutbursts with suitably short, less structured shoulders.
  • We present an examination of high resolution, ultraviolet spectroscopy from Hubble Space Telescope of the photospheric spectrum of the O-supergiant in the massive X-ray binary HD 226868 = Cyg X-1. We analyzed this and ground-based optical spectra to determine the effective temperature and gravity of the O9.7 Iab supergiant. Using non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE), line blanketed, plane parallel models from the TLUSTY grid, we obtain T_eff = 28.0 +/- 2.5kK and log g > 3.00 +/- 0.25, both lower than in previous studies. The optical spectrum is best fit with models that have enriched He and N abundances. We fit the model spectral energy distribution for this temperature and gravity to the UV, optical, and IR fluxes to determine the angular size of and extinction towards the binary. The angular size then yields relations for the stellar radius and luminosity as a function of distance. By assuming that the supergiant rotates synchronously with the orbit, we can use the radius - distance relation to find mass estimates for both the supergiant and black hole as a function of the distance and the ratio of stellar to Roche radius. Fits of the orbital light curve yield an additional constraint that limits the solutions in the mass plane. Our results indicate masses of 23^{+8}_{-6} M_sun for the supergiant and 11^{+5}_{-3} M_sun for the black hole.
  • We present results from Hubble Space Telescope UV spectroscopy of the massive X-ray binary system, HD226868 = Cyg X-1. The spectra were obtained at both orbital conjunction phases in two separate runs in 2002 and 2003 when the system was in the X-ray high/soft state. The stellar wind lines suffer large reductions in strength when the black hole is in the foreground due to the X-ray ionization of the wind ions. A comparison of HST and archival IUE spectra shows that similar photoionization effects occur in both the X-ray states. We constructed model UV wind line profiles assuming that X-ray ionization occurs everywhere in the wind except the zone where the supergiant blocks the X-ray flux. The good match between the observed and model profiles indicates that the wind ionization extends to near to the hemisphere of the supergiant facing the X-ray source. The H-alpha emission strength is generally lower in the high/soft state compared to the low/hard state, but the He II 4686 emission is relatively constant between states. The results suggest that mass transfer in Cyg X-1 is dominated by a focused wind flow that peaks along the axis joining the stars and that the stellar wind contribution is shut down by X-ray photoionization effects. The strong stellar wind from the shadowed side of the supergiant will stall when Coriolis deflection brings the gas into the region of X-ray illumination. This stalled gas component may be overtaken by the orbital motion of the black hole and act to inhibit accretion from the focused wind. The variations in the strength of the shadow wind component may then lead to accretion rate changes that ultimately determine the X-ray state.
  • We present phase-resolved low resolution infrared spectra of the polar EF Eridani obtained over a period of 2 years with SPEX on the IRTF. The spectra, covering the wavelength range 0.8 to 2.4 microns, are dominated by cyclotron emission at all phases. We use a ``Constant Lambda'' prescription to attempt to model the changing cyclotron features seen in the spectra. A single cyclotron emission component with B = 12.6 MG, and a plasma temperature of kT = 5.0 keV, does a reasonable job in matching the features seen in the H and K bands, but fails to completely reproduce the morphology shortward of 1.6 microns. We find that a two component model, where both components have similar properties, but whose contributions differ with viewing geometry, provides an excellent fit to the data. We discuss the implications of our models and compare them with previously published results. In addition, we show that a cyclotron model with similar properties to those used for modeling the infrared spectra, but with a field strength of B = 115 MG, can explain the GALEX observations of EF Eri.
  • We report on the discovery of J0644+3344, a bright deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable (CV) binary. Spectral signatures of both binary components and an accretion disk can be seen at optical wavelengths. The optical spectrum shows broad H I, He I, and He II accretion disk emission lines with deep narrow absorption components from H I, He I, Mg II and Ca II. The absorption lines are seen throughout the orbital period, disappearing only during primary eclipse. These absorption lines are either the the result of an optically-thick inner accretion disk or from the photosphere of the primary star. Radial velocity measurements show that the H I, He I, and Mg II absorption lines phase with the the primary star, while weak absorption features in the continuum phase with the secondary star. Radial velocity solutions give a 150+/-4 km/s semi-amplitude for the primary star and 192.8+/-5.6 km/s for the secondary. The individual stellar masses are 0.63-0.69 Mdot for the primary and 0.49-0.54 Mdot for the secondary. The bright eclipsing nature of this binary has helped provide masses for both components with an accuracy rarely achieved for CVs. This binary most closely resembles a nova-like UX UMa or SW Sex type of CV. J0644+3344, however, has a longer orbital period than most UX UMa or SW Sex stars. Assuming an evolution toward shorter orbital periods, J0644+3344 is therefore likely to be a young interacting binary. The secondary star is consistent with the size and spectral type of a K8 star, but has an M0 mass.
  • We investigated the low state of the polar VV Pup by collecting high S/N time series spectra. We monitored VV Pup with VLT+FORS1 and analyzed the evolution of its spectroscopic features across two orbits. We report the first detection of photospheric Zeeman lines in VV Puppis. We argue that the photospheric field structure is inconsistent with the assumption that the accretion shocks are located close to the foot points of a closed field line in a dipolar field distribution. A more complex field structure and coupling process is implied making VV Puppis similar to other well studied AM Herculis type systems.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope photometry of six short-period polars, EF Eri, V347 Pav, VV Pup, V834 Cen, GG Leo, and MR Ser. We have combined the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (3.6 -8.0 microns) data with the 2MASS J, H, K_s photometry to construct the spectral energy distributions of these systems from the near- to mid-IR (1.235 - 8 microns). We find that five out of the six polars have flux densities in the mid-IR that are substantially in excess of the values expected from the stellar components alone. We have modeled the observed SEDs with a combination of contributions from the white dwarf, secondary star, and either cyclotron emission or a cool, circumbinary dust disk to fill in the long-wavelength excess. We find that a circumbinary dust disk is the most likely cause of the 8 micron excess in all cases, but we have been unable to rule out the specific (but unlikely) case of completely optically thin cyclotron emission as the source of the observed 8 micron flux density. While both model components can generate enough flux at 8 microns, neither dust nor cyclotron emission alone can match the excess above the stellar components at all wavelengths. A model combining both cyclotron and dust contributions, possibly with some accretion-generated flux in the near-IR, is probably required, but our observed SEDs are not sufficiently well-sampled to constrain such a complicated model. If the 8 micron flux density is caused by the presence of a circumbinary dust disk, then our estimates of the masses of these disks are many orders of magnitude below the mass required to affect CV evolution.
  • We present an analysis of the color and variability characteristics for point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS cataloged ~23 square degrees in BVI filters from ~16--24 mag to investigate variability in faint sources at moderate to high Galactic latitudes. Point source completeness is found to be >83% for a selected representative sample (V=17.5--22.0 mag, B-V=0.0--1.5) containing both photometric B, V detections and 80% of the time-sampled V data available compared to a basic internal source completeness of 99%. Multi-epoch (10--30) observations in V spanning minutes to years modeled by light curve simulations reveal amplitude sensitivities to 0.015--0.075 mag over a representative V=18--22 mag range. Periodicity determinations appear viable to time-scales of an order 1 day or less using the most sampled fields (~30 epochs). The fraction of point sources is found to be generally variable at 5--8% over V=17.5--22.0 mag. For V brighter than 19 mag, the variable population is dominated by low amplitude (<0.05 mag) and blue (B-V<0.35) sources, possibly representing a population of gamma Doradus stars. Overall, the dominant population of variable sources are bluer than B-V=0.65 and have Main Sequence colors, likely reflecting larger populations of RR Lyrae, SX Phe, gamma Doradus, and W UMa variables.