• Besides the fact that the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they provide a direct way to obtain deeper insights into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we use three-dimensional explosion models and perform radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be rather different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occuring in SNe Ia permits additional constraints concerning several explosion model properties that are not easily accessible within other wavelength ranges. Proposed future MeV missions such as GRIPS will resolve all spectral details only for nearby SNe Ia, but hardness ratio and light curve measurements still allow for a distinction of the two different models at 10 and 16 Mpc for an exposure time of 10^6 s, respectively. The possibility to detect the strongest line features up to the Virgo distance will offer the opportunity to build up a first sample of SN Ia detections in the gamma-ray energy range and underlines the importance of future space observatories for MeV gamma rays.