• Massive galaxy clusters are now found as early as 3 billion years after the Big Bang, containing stars that formed at even earlier epochs. The high-redshift progenitors of these galaxy clusters, termed 'protoclusters', are identified in cosmological simulations with the highest dark matter overdensities. While their observational signatures are less well defined compared to virialized clusters with a substantial hot intra-cluster medium (ICM), protoclusters are expected to contain extremely massive galaxies that can be observed as luminous starbursts. Recent claimed detections of protoclusters hosting such starbursts do not support the kind of rapid cluster core formation expected in simulations because these structures contain only a handful of starbursting galaxies spread throughout a broad structure, with poor evidence for eventual collapse into a protocluster. Here we report that the source SPT2349-56 consists of at least 14 gas-rich galaxies all lying at z = 4.31 based on sensitive observations of carbon monoxide and ionized carbon. We demonstrate that each of these galaxies is forming stars between 50 and 1000 times faster than our own Milky Way, and all are located within a projected region only $\sim$ 130 kiloparsecs in diameter. This galaxy surface density is more than 10 times the average blank field value (integrated over all redshifts) and $>$1000 times the average field volume density. The velocity dispersion ($\sim$ 410 km s$^{-1}$) of these galaxies and enormous gas and star formation densities suggest that this system represents a galaxy cluster core at an advanced stage of formation when the Universe was only 1.4 billion years old. A comparison with other known protoclusters at high redshifts shows that SPT2349-56 is a uniquely massive and dense system that could be building one of the most massive structures in the Universe today.
  • High-redshift, luminous, dusty star forming galaxies (DSFGs) constrain the extremity of galaxy formation theories. The most extreme are discovered through follow-up on candidates in large area surveys. Here we present 850 $\mu$m SCUBA-2 follow-up observations of 188 red DSFG candidates from the \textit{Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey, covering 274 deg$^2$. We detected 87 per cent with a signal-to-noise ratio $>$ 3 at 850~$\mu$m. We introduce a new method for incorporating the confusion noise in our spectral energy distribution fitting by sampling correlated flux density fluctuations from a confusion limited map. The new 850~$\mu$m data provide a better constraint on the photometric redshifts of the candidates, with photometric redshift errors decreasing from $\sigma_z/(1+z)\approx0.21$ to $0.15$. Comparison spectroscopic redshifts also found little bias ($\langle (z-z_{\rm spec})/(1+z_{\rm spec})\rangle = 0.08 $). The mean photometric redshift is found to be 3.6 with a dispersion of $0.4$ and we identify 21 DSFGs with a high probability of lying at $z > 4$. After simulating our selection effects we find number counts are consistent with phenomenological galaxy evolution models. There is a statistically significant excess of WISE-1 and SDSS sources near our red galaxies, giving a strong indication that lensing may explain some of the apparently extreme objects. Nevertheless, our sample should include examples of galaxies with the highest star formation rates in the Universe ($\gg10^3$ M$_\odot$yr$^{-1}$).
  • Writing data in parallel is a common operation in some computing environments and a good proxy for a number of other parallel processing patterns. The duration of time taken to write data in large-scale compute environments can vary considerably. This variation comes from a number of sources, both systematic and transient. The result is a highly complex behavior that is difficult to characterize. This paper further develops the model for parallel task variability proposed in the paper "A parallel workload has extreme variability" (Henwood et. al 2016). This model is the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution. This paper further develops the systematic analysis that leads to the GEV model with the addition of a traffic congestion term. Observations of a parallel workload are presented from a High Performance Computing environment under typical production conditions, which include traffic congestion. An analysis of the workload is performed and shows the variability tends towards GEV as the order of parallelism is increased. The results are presented in the context of Amdahl's law and the predictive properties of a GEV models are discussed. A optimization for certain machine designs is also suggested.
  • We present detailed studies of a $z=2.12$ submillimeter galaxy, ALESS67.1, using sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA, AO-aided VLT/SINFONI, and HST/CANDELS data to investigate the kinematics and spatial distributions of dust emission (870 $\mu$m continuum), $^{12}$CO($J$=3-2), strong optical emission lines, and visible stars. Dynamical modelling of the optical emission lines suggests that ALESS67.1 is not a pure rotating disk but a merger, consistent with the apparent tidal features revealed in the HST imaging. Our sub-arcsecond resolution dataset allow us to measure half-light radii for all the tracers, and we find a factor of 4-6 smaller sizes in dust continuum compared to all the other tracers, including $^{12}$CO, and UV and H$\alpha$ emission is significantly offset from the dust continuum. The spatial mismatch between UV continuum and the cold dust and gas reservoir supports the explanation that geometrical effects are responsible for the offset of dusty galaxy on the IRX-$\beta$ diagram. Using a dynamical method we derive an $\alpha_{\rm CO}=1.8\pm1.0$, consistent with other SMGs that also have resolved CO and dust measurements. Assuming a single $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ value we also derive resolved gas and star-formation rate surface densities, and find that the core region of the galaxy ($\lesssim5$ kpc) follows the trend of mergers on the Schmidt-Kennicutt relationship, whereas the outskirts ($\gtrsim5$ kpc) lie on the locus of normal star-forming galaxies, suggesting different star-formation efficiencies within one galaxy. Our results caution against using single size or morphology for different tracers of the star-formation activity and gas content of galaxies, and therefore argue the need to use spatially-resolved, multi-wavelength observations to interpret the properties of SMGs, and perhaps even for $z>1$ galaxies in general.
  • We present 1.3- and/or 3-mm continuum images and 3-mm spectral scans, obtained using NOEMA and ALMA, of 21 distant, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). Our sample is a subset of the galaxies selected by Ivison et al. (2016) on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared (far-IR) colours and low {\it Herschel} flux densities; most are thus expected to be unlensed, extraordinarily luminous starbursts at $z \gtrsim 4$, modulo the considerable cross-section to gravitational lensing implied by their redshift. We observed 17 of these galaxies with NOEMA and four with ALMA, scanning through the 3-mm atmospheric window. We have obtained secure redshifts for seven galaxies via detection of multiple CO lines, one of them a lensed system at $z=6.027$ (two others are also found to be lensed); a single emission line was detected in another four galaxies, one of which has been shown elsewhere to lie at $z=4.002$. Where we find no spectroscopic redshifts, the galaxies are generally less luminous by 0.3-0.4 dex, which goes some way to explaining our failure to detect line emission. We show that this sample contains amongst the most luminous known star-forming galaxies. Due to their extreme star-formation activity, these galaxies will consume their molecular gas in $\lesssim 100$ Myr, despite their high molecular gas masses, and are therefore plausible progenitors of the massive, `red-and-dead' elliptical galaxies at $z \approx 3$.
  • We report the discovery and constrain the physical conditions of the interstellar medium of the highest-redshift millimeter-selected dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) to date, SPT-S J031132-5823.4 (hereafter SPT0311-58), at $z=6.900 +/- 0.002$. SPT0311-58 was discovered via its 1.4mm thermal dust continuum emission in the South Pole Telescope (SPT)-SZ survey. The spectroscopic redshift was determined through an ALMA 3mm frequency scan that detected CO(6-5), CO(7-6) and [CI](2-1), and subsequently confirmed by detections of CO(3-2) with ATCA and [CII] with APEX. We constrain the properties of the ISM in SPT0311-58 with a radiative transfer analysis of the dust continuum photometry and the CO and [CI] line emission. This allows us to determine the gas content without ad hoc assumptions about gas mass scaling factors. SPT0311-58 is extremely massive, with an intrinsic gas mass of $M_{\rm gas} = 3.3 \pm 1.9 \times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$. Its large mass and intense star formation is very rare for a source well into the Epoch of Reionization.
  • We study the heating mechansims and Ly{\alpha} escape fractions of 35 Ly{\alpha} blobs (LABs) at z = 3.1 in the SSA22 field, using the submillimeter (submm) data from the ALMA and the SCUBA-2 on the JCMT, and the radio data from the VLA. With ALMA and JCMT/SCUBA-2, we have identified dust continuum sources in 11 out of 35 LABs in the SSA22 field, with star formation rates (SFRs) of above 100Msun/yr. Using VLA, we have detected likely radio counterparts in 9 out of 29 LABs in the SSA22 field. We find that a radio excess in the submm/radio detected LABs is common, suggesting that active galactic nuclei (AGN) may often be present in these systems. Most radio sources without X-ray counterparts are located in the centers of the LABs. However, it is surprising that all X-ray counterparts avoid the central regions of their LABs. Possibly these X-ray sources are associated with merging systems, which re-distribute the interstellar meidium (ISM) and circumgalactic medium (CGM), leading to highly inhomogeneous gas. Alternatively, AGN and its feedback may also be responsible for inhomogeneous Ly{\alpha} morphology in these LABs. We obtain escape fractions of Ly{\alpha} photons for the LABs based on the submm and Ly{\alpha} data, and find that the Ly{\alpha} escape fractions in the LABs are significantly lower than those found for Ly{\alpha} emitters (LAEs) in other studies. We suspect that this large difference is due to the SCUBA-2 detection threshold, the high dust attenuation indicated by the large SFRs in our sample, as well as the dense large-scale environment in SSA22.
  • We present ALMA [CI]($1-0$) (rest frequency 492 GHz) observations for a sample of 13 strongly-lensed dusty star-forming galaxies originally discovered at 1.4mm in a blank-field survey by the South Pole Telescope. We compare these new data with available [CI] observations from the literature, allowing a study of the ISM properties of $\sim 30$ extreme dusty star-forming galaxies spanning a redshift range $2 < z < 5$. Using the [CI] line as a tracer of the molecular ISM, we find a mean molecular gas mass for SPT-DSFGs of $6.6 \times 10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$. This is in tension with gas masses derived via low-$J$ $^{12}$CO and dust masses; bringing the estimates into accordance requires either (a) an elevated CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor for our sample of $\alpha_{\rm CO} \sim 2.5$ and a gas-to-dust ratio $\sim200$, or (b) an high carbon abundance $X_{\rm CI} \sim 7\times10^{-5}$. Using observations of a range of additional atomic and molecular lines (including [CI], [CII], and multiple transitions of CO), we use a modern Photodissociation Region code (3D-PDR) to assess the physical conditions (including the density, UV radiation field strength, and gas temperature) within the ISM of the DSFGs in our sample. We find that the ISM within our DSFGs is characterised by dense gas permeated by strong UV fields. We note that previous efforts to characterise PDR regions in DSFGs may have significantly underestimated the density of the ISM. Combined, our analysis suggests that the ISM of extreme dusty starbursts at high redshift consists of dense, carbon-rich gas not directly comparable to the ISM of starbursts in the local Universe.
  • In both high-performance computing (HPC) environments and the public cloud, the duration of time to retrieve or save your results is simultaneously unpredictable and important to your over all resource budget. It is generally accepted ("Google: Taming the Long Latency Tail - When More Machines Equals Worse Results", Todd Hoff, highscalability.com 2012), but without a robust explanation, that identical parallel tasks do take different durations to complete -- a phenomena known as variability. This paper advances understanding of this topic. We carefully choose a model from which system-level complexity emerges that can be studied directly. We find that a generalized extreme value (GEV) model for variability naturally emerges. Using the public cloud, we find real-world observations have excellent agreement with our model. Since the GEV distribution is a limit distribution this suggests a universal property of parallel systems gated by the slowest communication element of some sort. Hence, this model is applicable to a variety of processing and IO tasks in parallel environments. These findings have important implications, ranging from characterizing ideal performance for parallel codes to detecting degraded behaviour at extreme scales.
  • We present high-resolution (0.16$"$) 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaging of 16 luminous (L_IR ~ 4 x 10^12 L_sun) submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from the ALESS survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This dust imaging traces the dust-obscured star formation in these z~2.5 galaxies on ~1.3 kpc scales. The emission has a median effective radius of $R_e=0.24" \pm 0.02"$, corresponding to a typical physical size of $R_{e}=1.8\pm$0.2 kpc. We derive a median S\'ersic index of $n=0.9\pm0.2$, implying that the dust emission is remarkably disk-like at the current resolution and sensitivity. We use different weighting schemes with the visibilities to search for clumps on 0.12$"$ (~1.0 kpc) scales, but we find no significant evidence for clumping in the majority of cases. Indeed, we demonstrate using simulations that the observed morphologies are generally consistent with smooth exponential disks, suggesting that caution should be exercised when identifying candidate clumps in even moderate S/N interferometric data. We compare our maps to comparable-resolution HST H$_{160}$-band images, finding that the stellar morphologies appear significantly more extended and disturbed, and suggesting that major mergers may be responsible for driving the formation of the compact dust disks we observe. The stark contrast between the obscured and unobscured morphologies may also have implications for SED fitting routines that assume the dust is co-located with the optical/near-IR continuum emission. Finally, we discuss the potential of the current bursts of star formation to transform the observed galaxy sizes and light profiles, showing that the $z\sim0$ descendants of these SMGs are expected to have stellar masses, effective radii, and gas surface densities consistent with the most compact massive (M_* ~ 1-2 x 10^11 M_sun) early-type galaxies observed locally.
  • We present Chandra ACIS-S and ATCA radio continuum observations of the strongly lensed dusty, star-forming galaxy SPT-S J034640-5204.9 (hereafter SPT0346-52) at $z$ = 5.656. This galaxy has also been observed with ALMA, HST, Spitzer, Herschel, APEX, and the VLT. Previous observations indicate that if the infrared (IR) emission is driven by star formation, then the inferred lensing-corrected star formation rate ($\sim$ 4500 $M_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$) and star formation rate surface density $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ ($\sim$ 2000 $M_{\sun} {yr^{-1}} {kpc^{-2}}$) are both exceptionally high. It remained unclear from the previous data, however, whether a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes appreciably to the IR luminosity. The {\it Chandra} upper limit shows that SPT0346-52 is consistent with being star-formation dominated in the X-ray, and any AGN contribution to the IR emission is negligible. The ATCA radio continuum upper limits are also consistent with the FIR-to-radio correlation for star-forming galaxies with no indication of an additional AGN contribution. The observed prodigious intrinsic IR luminosity of (3.6 $\pm$ 0.3) $\times$ 10$^{13}$ $L_{\sun}$ originates almost solely from vigorous star formation activity. With an intrinsic source size of 0.61 $\pm$ 0.03 kpc, SPT0346-52 is confirmed to have one of the highest $\Sigma_{SFR}$ of any known galaxy. This high $\Sigma_{SFR}$, which approaches the Eddington limit for a radiation pressure supported starburst, may be explained by a combination of very high star formation efficiency and gas fraction.
  • We have observed the dust continuum of ten z=3.1 Lyman Break Galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array at ~450 mas resolution in Band 7. We detect and resolve the 870um emission in one of the targets with an integrated flux density of S(870)=(192+/-57) uJy, and measure a stacked 3-sigma signal of S(870)=(67+/-23) uJy for the remaining nine. The total infrared luminosities estimated from full spectral energy distribution fits are L(8-1000um)=(8.4+/-2.3)x10^10 Lsun for the detection and L(8-1000um)=(2.9+/-0.9)x10^10 Lsun for the stack. With HST ACS I-band imaging we map the rest-frame UV emission on the same scale as the dust, effectively resolving the 'infrared excess' (IRX=L_FIR/L_UV) in a normal galaxy at z=3. Integrated over the galaxy we measure IRX=0.56+/-0.15, and the galaxy-averaged UV slope is beta=-1.25+/-0.03. This puts the galaxy a factor of ~10 below the IRX-beta relation for local starburst nuclei of Meurer et al. (1999). However, IRX varies by more than a factor of 3 across the galaxy, and we conclude that the complex relative morphology of the dust relative to UV emission is largely responsible for the scatter in the IRX-beta relation at high-z. A naive application of a Meurer-like dust correction based on the UV slope would dramatically over-estimate the total star formation rate, and our results support growing evidence that when integrated over the galaxy, the typical conditions in high-z star-forming galaxies are not analogous to those in the local starburst nuclei used to establish the Meurer relation.
  • We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) 850um continuum observations of the original Lyman-alpha Blob (LAB) in the SSA22 field at z=3.1 (SSA22-LAB01). The ALMA map resolves the previously identified submillimeter source into three components with total flux density S_850 = 1.68+/-0.06 mJy, corresponding to a star formation rate of ~150 M_sun/yr. The submillimeter sources are associated with several faint (m~27 mag) rest-frame ultraviolet sources identified in Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) clear filter imaging (~5850A). One of these companions is spectroscopically confirmed with Keck MOSFIRE to lie within 20 projected kpc and 250 km/s of one of the ALMA components. We postulate that some of these STIS sources represent a population of low-mass star-forming satellites surrounding the central submillimeter sources, potentially contributing to their growth and activity through accretion. Using a high resolution cosmological zoom simulation of a 10^13 M_sun halo at z=3, including stellar, dust and Ly-alpha radiative transfer, we can model the ALMA+STIS observations and demonstrate that Ly-alpha photons escaping from the central submillimeter sources are expected to resonantly scatter in neutral hydrogen, the majority of which is predicted to be associated with halo substructure. We show how this process gives rise to extended Ly-alpha emission with similar surface brightness and morphology to observed giant LABs.
  • Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/SPIRE maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg$^2$ of the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities $S_{500} > S_{350} >S_{250}$ and a $5 \sigma$ cut-off $S_{500} > $ 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these "red" sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The redshifts z = 5.1 and z = 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • We present the results of 325 MHz GMRT observations of a super-cluster field, known to contain five Abell clusters at redshift $z \sim 0.2$. We achieve a nominal sensitivity of $34\,\mu$Jy beam$^{-1}$ toward the phase centre. We compile a catalogue of 3257 sources with flux densities in the range $183\,\mu\rm{Jy}\,-\,1.5\,\rm{Jy}$ within the entire $\sim 6.5$ square degree field of view. Subsequently, we use available survey data at other frequencies to derive the spectral index distribution for a sub-sample of these sources, recovering two distinct populations -- a dominant population which exhibit spectral index trends typical of steep-spectrum synchrotron emission, and a smaller population of sources with typically flat or rising spectra. We identify a number of sources with ultra-steep spectra or rising spectra for further analysis, finding two candidate high-redshift radio galaxies and three gigahertz-peaked-spectrum radio sources. Finally, we derive the Euclidean-normalised differential source counts using the catalogue compiled in this work, for sources with flux densities in excess of $223 \, \mu$Jy. Our differential source counts are consistent with both previous observations at this frequency and models of the low-frequency source population. These represent the deepest source counts yet derived at 325 MHz. Our source counts exhibit the well-known flattening at mJy flux densities, consistent with an emerging population of star-forming galaxies; we also find marginal evidence of a downturn at flux densities below $308 \, \mu$Jy, a feature so far only seen at 1.4 GHz.
  • We present a catalogue of nearly 3,000 submillimetre sources detected at 850um over ~5 square degrees surveyed as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). This is the largest survey of its kind at 850um, probing a meaningful cosmic volume at the peak of star formation activity and increasing the sample size of submillimetre galaxies selected at 850um by an order of magnitude. We describe the wide 850um survey component of S2CLS, which covers the key extragalactic survey fields: UKIDSS-UDS, COSMOS, Akari-NEP, Extended Groth Strip, Lockman Hole North, SSA22 and GOODS-North. The average 1-sigma depth of S2CLS is 1.2 mJy/beam, approaching the SCUBA-2 850um confusion limit, which we determine to be ~0.8 mJy/beam. We measure the single dish 850um number counts to unprecedented accuracy, reducing the Poisson errors on the differential counts to approximately 4% at S_850~3mJy. With several independent fields, we investigate field-to-field variance, finding that the number counts on 0.5-1 degree scales are generally within 50% of the S2CLS mean for S_850>3mJy, with scatter consistent with the Poisson and estimated cosmic variance uncertainties, although there is a marginal (2-sigma) density enhancement in the GOODS-North field. The observed number counts are in reasonable agreement with recent phenomenological and semi-analytic models. Finally, the large solid angle of S2CLS allows us to measure the bright-end counts: at S_850>10mJy there are approximately ten sources per square degree, and we detect the distinctive up-turn in the number counts indicative of the detection of local sources of 850um emission and strongly lensed high-redshift galaxies. Here we describe the data collection and reduction procedures and present calibrated maps and a catalogue of sources; these are made publicly available.
  • The stellar halos of large galaxies represent a vital probe of the processes of galaxy evolution. They are the remnants of the initial bouts of star formation during the collapse of the proto-galactic cloud, coupled with imprint of ancient and on-going accretion events. Previously, we have reported the tentative detection of a possible, faint, extended stellar halo in the Local Group spiral, the Triangulum Galaxy (M33). However, the presence of substructure surrounding M33 made interpretation of this feature difficult. Here, we employ the final data set from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS), combined with an improved calibration and a newly derived contamination model for the region to revisit this claim. With an array of new fitting algorithms, fully accounting for contamination and the substantial substructure beyond the prominent stellar disk in M33, we reanalyse the surrounds to separate the signal of the stellar halo and the outer halo substructure. Using more robust search algorithms, we do not detect a large scale smooth stellar halo and place a limit on the maximum surface brightness of such a feature of ${\mu}_V$ = 35.5 mags per square arcsec, or a total halo luminosity of $L < 10^6L_{\odot}$.
  • We present the first results from an extended survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) using 41.1 h of observations by Spitzer-IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5$\,\mu$m. This survey extends previous observations to the outer disc and halo, covering total lengths of 4$.\!\!^\circ$4 and 6$.\!\!^\circ$6 along the minor and major axes, respectively. We have produced surface brightness profiles by combining the integrated light from background-corrected maps with stellar counts from a new catalogue of point sources. Using auxiliary catalogues we have carried out a statistical analysis in colour-magnitude space to discriminate M31 objects from foreground Milky Way stars and background galaxies. The catalogue includes 426,529 sources, of which 66 per cent have been assigned probability values to identify M31 objects with magnitude depths of [3.6]$\,=\,$19.0$\,\pm\,$0.2, [4.5]$\,=\,$18.7$\,\pm\,$0.2. We discuss applications of our data for constraining the stellar mass and characterising point sources in the outer radii.
  • The overall morphology and dynamics of magnetospheric substorms is well established in terms of the observed qualitative auroral features seen in ground-based magnetometers. This paper focuses on the quantitative characterization of substorm dynamics captured by ground-based magnetometer stations. We present the first analysis of substorms using dynamical networks obtained from the full available set of ground-based magnetometer observations in the Northern Hemisphere. The stations are connected in the network when the correlation between the vector magnetometer time series from pairs of stations within a running time window exceeds a threshold. Dimensionless parameters can then be obtained that characterize the network and by extension, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the substorm under observation. We analyze four isolated substorm test cases as well as a steady magnetic convection (SMC) event and a day in which no substorms occur. These test case substorms are found to give a consistent characteristic network response at onset in terms of their spatial correlation. Such responses are differentiable from responses to the SMC event and nonsubstorm times. We present a method to optimize network parametrization with respect to the different individual station responses, the spatial inhomogeneity of stations in the Northern Hemisphere, and the choice of correlation window sizes. Our results suggest that dynamical network analysis has potential to quantitatively categorize substorms.
  • Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity $P_{ICE}$ scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, $n_\alpha/n_i$, of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) as the likely emission mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.
  • Ly-alpha blobs (LABs) offer insight into the complex interface between galaxies and their circumgalactic medium. Whilst some LABs have been found to contain luminous star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei that could potentially power the Ly-alpha emission, others appear not to be associated with obvious luminous galaxy counterparts. It has been speculated that LABs may be powered by cold gas streaming on to a central galaxy, providing an opportunity to directly observe the `cold accretion' mode of galaxy growth. Star-forming galaxies in LABs could be dust obscured and therefore detectable only at longer wavelengths. We stack deep SCUBA-2 observations of the SSA22 field to determine the average 850um flux density of 34 LABs. We measure S_850 = 0.6 +/- 0.2mJy for all LABs, but stacking the LABs by size indicates that only the largest third (area > 1794 kpc^2) have a mean detection, at 4.5 sigma, with S_850 = 1.4 +/- 0.3mJy. Only two LABs (1 and 18) have individual SCUBA-2 > 3.5 sigma detections at a depth of 1.1mJy/beam. We consider two possible mechanisms for powering the LABs and find that central star formation is likely to dominate the emission of Ly-alpha, with cold accretion playing a secondary role.
  • We present a list of candidate gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) from the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS). Together, these partially overlapping surveys cover 372 deg$^{2}$ on the sky. After removing local spiral galaxies and known radio-loud blazars, our candidate list of lensed DSFGs is composed of 77 sources with 500 $\mu$m flux densities ($S_{500}$) greater than 100 mJy. Such sources are dusty starburst galaxies similar to the first bright Sub Millimeter Galaxies (SMGs) discovered with SCUBA. We expect a large fraction of this list to be strongly lensed, with a small fraction made up of bright SMG-SMG mergers that appear as Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyLIRGs; $\rm L_{IR}>10^{13} L_{\odot}$). Thirteen of the 77 candidates have spectroscopic redshifts from CO spectroscopy with ground-based interferometers, putting them at $z>1$ and well above the redshift of the foreground lensing galaxies. The surface density of our sample is 0.21 $\pm$ 0.03 deg$^{-2}$. We present follow-up imaging of a few of the candidates confirming their lensing nature. The sample presented here is an ideal tool for higher resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations to understand detailed properties of starburst phenomena in distant galaxies.
  • We use the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Cycle 1 to determine spectroscopic redshifts of high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected by their 1.4mm continuum emission in the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey. We present ALMA 3mm spectral scans between 84-114GHz for 15 galaxies and targeted ALMA 1mm observations for an additional eight sources. Our observations yield 30 new line detections from CO, [CI] , [NII] , H_2O and NH_3. We further present APEX [CII] and CO mid-J observations for seven sources for which only a single line was detected in spectral-scan data from ALMA Cycle 0 or Cycle 1. We combine the new observations with previously published and new mm/submm line and photometric data of the SPT-selected DSFGs to study their redshift distribution. The combined data yield 39 spectroscopic redshifts from molecular lines, a success rate of >85%. Our sample represents the largest data set of its kind today and has the highest spectroscopic completeness among all redshift surveys of high-z DSFGs. The median of the redshift distribution is z=3.9+/-0.4, and the highest-redshift source in our sample is at z=5.8. We discuss how the selection of our sources affects the redshift distribution, focusing on source brightness, selection wavelength, and strong gravitational lensing. We correct for the effect of gravitational lensing and find the redshift distribution for 1.4mm-selected sources with a median redshift of z=3.1+/-0.3. Comparing to redshift distributions selected at shorter wavelengths from the literature, we show that selection wavelength affects the shape of the redshift distribution.
  • Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we conducted a survey of CO J=1-0 and J=2-1 line emission towards strongly lensed high-redshift dusty star forming galaxies (DSFGs) previously discovered with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Our sample comprises 17 sources that had CO-based spectroscopic redshifts obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). We detect all sources with known redshifts in either CO J=1-0 or J=2-1. Twelve sources are detected in the 7-mm continuum. The derived CO luminosities imply gas masses in the range (0.5-11)x10^{10} M_sun and gas depletion timescales <200 Myr, using a CO to gas mass conversion factor alpha_CO=0.8 M_sun (K km/s pc^2)^{-1}. Combining the CO luminosities and dust masses, along with a fixed gas-to-dust ratio, we derive alpha_CO factors in the range 0.4-1.8, similar to what is found in other starbursting systems. We find small scatter in alpha_CO values within the sample, even though inherent variations in the spatial distribution of dust and gas in individual cases could bias the dust-based alpha_CO estimates. We find that lensing magnification factors based on the CO linewidth to luminosity relation (mu_CO) are highly unreliable, but particularly when mu<5. Finally, comparison of the gas and dynamical masses suggest that the average molecular gas fraction stays relatively constant at z=2-5 in the SPT DSFG sample.
  • We present ALMA detections of the [NII] 205$\mu$m and CO(12-11) emission lines, and the tentative detection of [CI] $^3$P$_1$ - $^3$P$_0$ for the strongly lensed ($\mu$=5.7$\pm$0.5) dusty, star-forming galaxy SPT-S J213242-5802.9 (hereafter SPT2132-58) at z=4.77. The [NII] and CO(12-11) lines are detected at 11.5 and 8.5 $\sigma$ level, respectively, by our band-6 observations. The [CI] line is detected at 3.2 $\sigma$ after a re-analysis of existing band-3 data. The [CI] luminosity implies a gas mass of 3.8$\pm$1.2$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$, and consequently a very short depletion timescale of 34$\pm$13 Myr and a CO-luminosity-to-gas-mass conversion factor $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ of 1.0$\pm$0.3 M$_\odot$ (K km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{2}$)$^{-1}$. SPT2132-58 is an extreme starburst with an intrinsic star formation rate of 1100$\pm$200 M$_\odot$/yr. We find a [CII]/[NII] ratio of 26$\pm$7, which is the highest reported at z$>$4. This suggests that SPT2132-58 hosts an evolved interstellar medium (0.5 Z$_\odot$<Z<1.5 Z$_\odot$), which may be dominated by photodissociation regions. The CO(2-1) and CO(5-4) transitions have lower CO-to-far-infrared ratios than local and high-redshift samples, while CO(12-11) is similar to these samples, suggesting the presence of an additional very excited component or an AGN.